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Academic Freedom

ACAD-123

Introduction

1.1. Durham College values and protects the principles of academic freedom, including freedom of inquiry, scholarly activity, and the publication of new knowledge. It will ensure a teaching and learning environment that supports academic freedom and recognizes the benefits of research and scholarly activity to both the College community and the community at large. 1.2. This policy provides a framework for research and scholarly activities by providing guidance and support for those engaged in such activities at Durham College. It also acknowledges that it is the responsibility of the researcher to adhere to ethical principles, rigor, intellectual honesty, and accountability.

1. Introduction 1.1. Durham College values and protects the principles of academic freedom, including freedom of inquiry, scholarly activity, and the publication of new knowledge. It will ensure a teaching and learning environment that supports academic freedom and recognizes the benefits of research and scholarly activity to both the College community and the community at large. 1.2. This policy provides a framework for research and scholarly activities by providing guidance and support for those engaged in such activities at Durham College. It also acknowledges that it is the responsibility of the researcher to adhere to ethical principles, rigor, intellectual honesty, and accountability. 2. Purpose The overarching purpose of this policy is to recognize that research and scholarly activities are key academic pursuits at Durham College. It recognizes that faculty members and others engaged in research authorized by the College are encouraged to pursue scholarly activities in the interest of creating new knowledge. These activities include the right to question and challenge traditional norms within their field of expertise, the freedom to define research questions, to pursue answers to those questions through proper investigative techniques, and to disseminate the knowledge gained to students, academic colleagues and society as a whole. 3. Definitions Refer to Durham College’s Standard Definitions. 4. Policy statements 4.1. Durham College seeks to provide academic freedom to support scholarship. 4.2. All research and scholarship must be conducted ethically and in ways that fully respect human rights as defined in law. Individuals conducting research involving humans must first seek approval through the Durham College Research Ethics Board. 4.3. Members of the Durham College community who are engaged in research and scholarly activity in the course of their academic appointment or otherwise authorized in writing by the College for purposes of research and investigative endeavours are individually accountable to comply with this policy. 4.4. Academic freedom does not imply rights greater than those granted by the laws of Canada to all Canadian residents. 4.5. There is a duty to respect the rights of others, to exercise academic freedom in a reasonable and responsible manner, and to respect the academic objectives of the College. 4.6. Academic freedom implies the right to communicate freely the acquired knowledge and the result of scholarly activity. 4.7. Researchers are free to select topics for scholarly activity and publish the results and conclusions of that work. They have the responsibility to ensure that scholarly activity meets high scientific and ethical standards, including honest and thoughtful inquiry and rigorous analysis. 4.8. Durham College has entered into a memorandum of understanding with the University of Ontario Tech University (Ontario Tech) to ensure that any animal care and use by Durham College is in compliance with the guidelines and policies of the Canadian Council on Animal Care (CCAC). As such, the DC/Ontario Tech Animal Care Committee (ACC) is responsible for reviewing any and all proposed animal use in science by Durham College faculty and staff. It is the responsibility of the Durham College employee who is involved in animal care and use to seek approval by the ACC before the animal use begins. 5. Procedure This section is not applicable. 6. Roles and responsibilities 6.1. It is the responsibility of the Vice-President, Academic and the Chief Administrative Officer to ensure this policy is fully implemented. 6.2. It is the responsibility of the researcher to ensure the intellectual and ethical quality of her or his work. All researchers shall use scholarly integrity and scientific rigor in obtaining, recording and analyzing data and in reporting and publishing results. 6.3. It is the responsibility of the researcher to seek approval from the Durham College Research Ethics Board prior to commencing any research involving humans. 6.4. It is the responsibility of the researcher to seek approval from the DC/Ontario Tech Animal Care Committee (ACC) prior to commencing any research involving animals. 6.5. It is the responsibility of the Durham College Research Ethics Board to ensure that any proposed research involving humans meets the requirements for ethical research as outlined in the Tri-Council Policy Statement for Research Involving Humans 7. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act considerations Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards have been considered in the development of this policy and procedure and it adheres to the principles outlined in the College’s commitment to accessibility as demonstrated by the Accessibility Plan (ADMIN-203). 8. Non-compliance implications Failure to comply with this policy may result in damage to internal and external relationships, financial loss, property damage, reputational harm, legal action and/or a diminished ability to achieve the mission of Durham College 9. Communications plan
  • A message will be posted on ICE alerting employees when new or revised policies and procedures are added to ICE.
  • A message will be posted on MyCampus alerting students when new or revised policies and procedures are added.
10. Related forms, legislation or external resources
  • Tri-Agency Framework: Responsible Conduct of Research
  • Tri-Council Policy Statement on Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Human.
View policy [PDF]

Academic Grading

ACAD-112

Introduction

Academic grades represent the level of student’s mastery of course outcomes and will serve as formative feedback on student progress. In order to assure the quality of our programs and graduates, the clear articulation and impartial implementation of a grading system is essential.

1. Introduction Academic grades represent the level of student’s mastery of course outcomes and will serve as formative feedback on student progress. In order to assure the quality of our programs and graduates, the clear articulation and impartial implementation of a grading system is essential. 2. Purpose This policy and procedure defines the standards for assigning mid-term and final grades to recognize student achievement in a course and program. 3. Definitions Refer to Durham College’s Standard Definitions. 4. Policy statements 4.1. The assigning of College-defined grades formalizes a student's status within a course and/or program and provides a basis for decisions including, but not limited to, recognition of excellence, promotion, academic probation and withdrawal. 4.2. The official record of a student’s final grades and academic progress is their Durham College academic record. 4.3. Students have the right to be advised of course evaluation expectations and criteria at the outset of the course. 4.4. Students have the right to objective grading. 4.5. Students have the right to review any test/assignment/evaluation after it has been graded by faculty, except when the test/assignment/evaluation is unavailable due to the use of a proprietary evaluation tool. 4.6. Mid-term grades for post-secondary courses (with the exception of OntarioLearn) will be made available to students as a measure of their academic progress in a course. 4.7. The final grades of students are not official until recorded in the Student Information System (Banner) and released via the student portal (MyCampus) or issued in hard copy by the office of Strategic Enrolment Services (SES). Student grades are confidential, and will not be publicly posted or released without the written permission of the student. In keeping with privacy legislation, student grades will not be provided via telephone or email. 4.8. A pass in each course is fifty percent (50 per cent). However, some courses and/or programs may require students to achieve more than a 50 per cent pass in order to be successful in the course and proceed in their program. For those courses and/or programs, the course outline(s) and/or program guide will specify passing grade and progression requirements. 4.9. If a course is repeated to replace a failed or lower final grade, the higher grade will always be used to calculate the SGPA and PGPA and to determine academic standing. All final grades will appear on the academic record. 4.10. Where a failed course is prerequisite to a course in the next level, the Executive Dean/Dean or designate may authorize the student to register concurrently in the failed course and in the course in the next level for which the course is the prerequisite. 4.11. A failed prerequisite course will not be granted a passing final grade on the basis of the successful completion of the advanced level course linked to that prerequisite. 4.12. Any change in final grades must be officially documented and must be submitted by the end of the next sequential academic semester. 4.13. Under exceptional circumstances, students have the right to apply for aegrotat standing (see 4.18.3). 4.14. Numerical grade values will be used to calculate SGPA and PGPA. In courses where a satisfactory/unsatisfactory or a pass/fail evaluation system is used, satisfactory or pass represents successful completion of course requirements. 4.15. A passing final grade in a Durham College course will override a transfer credit previously awarded and will be used in the calculation of a SGPA and PGPA. 4.16. A College-wide grading system will be applied in all courses (see 4.18). 4.17. All sections of a given course are to use the same grade designation (see 4.18). 4.18. The Durham College grading system is defined as follows: 4.18.1. Grade Designations with Numeric Value – Post-Secondary Programs:

Numeric Grade Range

Letter Equivalent

Grade Points

100 – 90

A+

5.0

89 – 85

A

4.5

84 – 80

A-

4.0

79 – 75

B+

3.5

74 – 70

B

3.0

69 – 65

B-

2.5

64 – 60

C

2.0

59 – 55

D+

1.5

50 – 54

D

1.0

Below 50

F

0.0
  4.18.2. Grade Designations with Numeric Value – Apprenticeship Programs

Numeric Grade Range

Letter Equivalent

Grade Points

100 – 90 A+ 5.0
89 – 85 A 4.5
84 – 80 A- 4.0
79 – 75 B+ 3.5
74 – 70 B 3.0
69 – 65 C+ 2.5
64 – 60 C 2.0
Below 60 F 0.0
  4.18.3. Grade Designations Without a Numeric Value The following grades do not carry a grade point value and are not used in the calculation of a student’s SGPA and PGPA: AEG Aegrotat Applies to those students whose performance over a significant proportion of the course (minimum of 70 per cent) has been more than satisfactory but where, because of exceptional circumstances the student is unable to complete the course. Under these circumstances, the student receives credit for taking the course. The process for applying for aegrotat consideration is outlined in the Aegrotat policy and procedure (ACAD-110). AU Audit Students seeking to audit a course must declare their intent at the time of registration. Students who audit a course are not eligible to have course work evaluated or graded, and are assigned an AU designation at the completion of the course. Audit courses cannot revert to credit courses at any time. The process for registering as an audit student is outlined in the Registration and Records policy and procedure (ADMIN-207). TC Transfer Credit Transfer credit may be given in recognition of the successful completion of an equivalent course taken at another recognized postsecondary institution. Transfer credits are not used in the calculation of a student’s SGPA and PGPA. Equivalent courses completed at Durham College (for example, as part of another program previously completed) are considered “internal credits” and will be accepted toward post-secondary credentials where appropriate. Courses for which internal credit has been granted will show the numeric grade received and will be included in the calculation of the SGPA and PGPA. EX Exemption Indicates a passing grade achieved in a post-admission test and the student will be exempt from taking a Communications course within their program of study. INC Incomplete Used when students have not completed the requirements of a course because of exceptional circumstances and have been granted an extension of up to 60 calendar days after the end of term to complete the course. NGA No Grade Assigned Designated when a faculty member has not assigned a final grade by the published submission deadlines as outlined in the academic calendar in a course of a standard semester duration. PASS Pass Represents the successful completion of skill based requirements, as detailed in the course outline. FAIL Fail Represents the unsuccessful completion of skill based requirements, as detailed in the course outline. SAT Satisfactory Represents the successful completion of skill based requirements, as detailed in the course outline. UNSAT Unsatisfactory Represents the unsuccessful completion of skill based requirements, as detailed in the appropriate course outline. W Withdrawn Assigned to a student who formally withdraws from a course after the 10th day of classes, but before 75 per cent of the course hours have been completed. 5. Procedure 5.1. Mid-Term Grades for Post-Secondary Courses 5.1.1. Faculty will export mid-term semester grades (where available) from the DC Connect portal to the Student Information System (Banner) as per published deadlines (as outlined in the academic calendar). 5.1.2. Once the mid-term grades have been exported to Banner, they are available for viewing on the MyCampus portal. 5.2. Final Grades 5.2.1. Faculty will export final grades each academic semester through the DC Connect portal as per published deadlines (as outlined in the academic calendar). 5.2.2. Once the final grades have been exported to Banner, Strategic Enrolment Services (SES) will:
  • move final grades to the student’s academic history;
  • calculate the SGPA for all students in the academic semester;
  • determine the academic progression status for all students in the academic semester;
  • de-register students who must be dropped from a course (or courses) in their next semester because they have failed the prerequisite for that course (or courses); and
  • notify all students who have failed one or more courses via DC email.
5.2.3. Once all of the above processes have been validated, the final grades will be released to students for viewing on the MyCampus portal. 5.3. No Grade Assigned (NGA) 5.3.1. Any grades that remain unassigned by the published submission deadlines (as outlined in the academic calendar) will be designated as NGA. 5.3.2. SES will generate a report of all NGA grades and will distribute this information to the administrative coordinator (or designate) in each academic school for review and follow-up with faculty. 5.3.3. Grade change forms will be submitted to SES by the academic schools for each outstanding NGA grade. Grades for any course that are submitted beyond the published submission deadlines may be submitted to SES using a class list. 5.3.4. SES will update the grade change to Banner and will notify the student via DC mail. 5.3.5. If a grade change form is not submitted with 24 hours of grades being updated to Banner, SES will:
  • update the NGA grade to a value of zero, UNSAT or FAIL (as appropriate to grading scheme of the course);
  • de-register students who must be dropped from a course (or courses) in their next semester because they have failed the prerequisite for that course (or courses); and
  • notify the student via DC mail.
5.4. Incomplete Grades (INC) 5.4.1. When a faculty member wishes to submit a grade of INC, they will complete a Record of Incomplete Grade form and submit this to their academic school for consideration. 5.4.2. The executive dean or associate dean will review and make a decision on approval of the INC grade. 5.4.3. The faculty member will be advised of the decision and if approved, will assign the INC grade. If not approved, the final grade will be assigned as calculated. 5.4.4. The academic school or faculty will advise the student of the decision and will confirm the Conditions for Completion and Deadline Date for Completion. 5.4.5. Sixty [60] days after the end of the academic semester, SES will generate a report of all INC grades and will distribute this information to the executive dean/dean and the administrative coordinator in each academic school for review and follow-up with faculty. 5.4.6. Grade change forms will be submitted to SES by the academic schools for each outstanding INC grade. 5.4.7. SES will update the grade change to Banner and will notify the student via DC mail. 5.4.8. After 5 business days after generating the report of all INC grades, SES will:
  • update all remaining INC grades to the grade achieved at the end of the academic semester;
  • de-register students who must be dropped from a course (or courses) in their next academic semester because they have failed the prerequisite for that course (or courses); and
  • notify the student via DC mail.
5.5. All Other Grade Changes 5.5.1. When a faculty member wishes to change a grade, they will complete a Grade Change form and submit the form to their school office for consideration. 5.5.2. The executive dean/dean or associate dean will review and make a decision on the approval of the grade change. 5.5.3. The approved grade change form will be submitted to SES by the academic school. 5.5.4. SES will update the grade change to Banner and will notify the student via DC mail. 5.6. College honour roll 5.6.1. At the end of each academic semester, each academic school will run a report to determine all of the students eligible for the college honour roll. All full-time students with a SGPA of 4.0 or greater will qualify. 5.6.2. Any student who has failed one or more courses, or has one or more INC or NGA grade designation will not receive honour roll recognition until such time as the course(s) are completed, and if the re-calculated SGPA meets the 4.0 minimum standard. 5.6.3. Each academic school will produce personalized college honour roll letters as well as a list of all honour roll certificates. The letters are signed by the appropriate executive dean/dean and made available to the students. 5.6.4. If desired, each academic school has the option of posting a list of all college honour roll recipients in the academic school office and/or on MyCampus under the school tab. Due to publication deadlines, only those students who complete all college honour roll requirements as detailed above will be noted on the printed list. 6. Roles and responsibilities 6.1. It is the responsibility of the Vice-President, Academic, in collaboration with the executive director/registrar to ensure this procedure is fully implemented. 6.2. It is the responsibility of the student to initiate applications for withdrawal, credit transfer, aegrotat, or exemption and to do so within the specified timeframes (as published in the academic calendar). 6.3. It is the responsibility of faculty to ensure that mid-term and final grades are submitted according to the framework of this procedure. 6.4. It is the responsibility of the academic schools to ensure that the timelines for the submission of mid-term and final grades adhere to the framework of this procedure. 6.5. It is the responsibility of SES to maintain the official student academic record, ensure grade point average calculations are accurate, and to post final grades to Banner according to published deadlines. 6.6. It is the responsibility of the academic schools to identify the recipients of the college honour roll. 7. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act considerations Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards have been considered in the development of this policy and procedure and it adheres to the principles outlined in the College’s commitment to accessibility as demonstrated by the Accessibility Plan (ADMIN-203). 8. Non-compliance implications Non-compliance puts the college at risk of grade appeals. 9. Communications plan
  • A message will be posted on ICE alerting employees when new or revised policies and procedures are added to ICE.
  • A message will be posted on MyCampus alerting students when new or revised policies and procedures are added.
10. Related forms, legislation or external resources
  • Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities - Minister’s Binding Policy Directive on Framework for Programs of Instruction
View policy [PDF]

Academic Integrity

ACAD-101

Introduction

Academic integrity in teaching, learning and research is fundamental to our mission and an expectation of the Durham College community. Acts that undermine academic integrity contradict our core values, erode educational inquiry and diminish the quality of our scholarship and reputation.

cheat, cheating 1. Introduction Academic integrity in teaching, learning and research is fundamental to our mission and an expectation of the Durham College community. Acts that undermine academic integrity contradict our core values, erode educational inquiry and diminish the quality of our scholarship and reputation. 2. Purpose This policy and procedure provides the foundation for fostering and maintaining high academic standards while protecting the integrity of Durham College’s credentials and supports the accurate assessment of student performance while promoting Durham College values of transparency and integrity. 3. Definitions Refer to Durham College’s Standard Definitions. 4. Policy statements 4.1. It is an expectation of all students, staff, faculty and educational partners to be aware of and comply with Durham College’s high standard of academic integrity. 4.2. There is a wide variety of supports available to the College community to support academic integrity. 4.3. The College will endeavour to design curricula, assessments and learning environments that support academic integrity. 4.4. The College will provide information and guidance about the nature of and penalties for academic dishonesty. 4.5. All suspected breaches of this policy will be reported to the appropriate executive dean/dean or associate dean. 4.6. Penalties for academic dishonesty will be applied progressively, consider the entire student academic history at Durham College and be commensurate with the nature of the offence. 5. Procedure 5.1. Durham College faculty and staff can reduce and/or eliminate opportunities for breaches of academic integrity through preventative methodologies. 5.2. Faculty may choose to verify the originality of student work using a variety of techniques, including the use of plagiarism identification software. 5.3. Each allegation will be responded to with the principles of procedural fairness. 5.4. Breaches of Academic Integrity 5.4.1. Alleged breaches of academic integrity will be documented on the Academic Integrity Alert form and signed by the faculty member. If the integrity alert involves more than one student, an Academic Integrity form must be completed for each individual. 5.4.2. The faculty member will invite the student to meet and discuss the alleged academic breach and the student will have the option of responding to the allegation by writing comments on the Academic Integrity Alert form and/or signing the form in acknowledgement of its receipt. 5.4.3. The student who fails to be available to review the Academic Integrity Alert form and/or refuses to discuss the allegation with the faculty member will be notified in writing (via college email) by the faculty member that an Academic Integrity Alert has been submitted. 5.4.4. The Academic Integrity Alert form will be submitted to the executive dean/dean or associate dean within five business days of the alleged breach being known by the faculty member. 5.4.5. Alleged breaches of academic integrity will be investigated and documented in an objective and fair manner by the executive dean/dean or associate dean. The student will be presented with any information that is part of the investigation. 5.4.6. Upon notification, the student is responsible to discuss the allegation with the executive dean/dean or associate dean. 5.4.7. The executive dean/dean or associate dean in consultation with the faculty member will determine the penalty for the breach of academic integrity. 5.4.8. At the discretion of the appropriate executive dean/dean or associate dean, a completed Academic Integrity Alert form may also be submitted to the associate vice-president, Academic for additional discussion. 5.4.9. Decisions regarding academic integrity may be appealed, as per the college’s Grade Appeal policy and procedure (ACAD111). 5.4.10. The original completed Academic Integrity Alert will be retained in the school office. A copy will be provided to the student and faculty member via college email. 5.4.11. A copy of the completed Academic Integrity Alert form will be sent to Strategic Enrolment Services, and a permanent entry made in the Student Information System (Banner) if a penalty has been assessed. 5.5. Penalties for Breaches of Academic Integrity 5.5.1. A first breach of academic integrity may result in one or more of the following penalties, at the discretion of the executive dean/dean/associate dean or designate:
  • A referral to Student Academic Learning Services (SALS) to complete the Academic Integrity modules;
  • Repeat the original assessment or alternative assessment;
  • A deduction of the assessment by a portion of the grade;
  • A zero on the assessment;
  • An academic performance contract;
  • Removal from a course with a grade of “0” or F;
  • Removal from a program.
In circumstances where the executive dean/dean or associate dean recommends student withdrawal from a program for a first offence, the matter will be referred to the associate vice-president, Academic for disposition. 5.5.2. A second breach of academic integrity may result in one or more of the following penalties, at the discretion of the executive dean/dean or associate dean:
  • A deduction of the assessment by a portion of the grade;
  • A zero on the assessment;
  • An academic performance contract;
  • Removal from a course with a grade of “0” or “F”;
  • Removal from a program.
In circumstances where the executive dean/dean or associate dean recommends student withdrawal from a program for a second offence, the matter will be referred to the associate vice-president, Academic for disposition. 5.5.3. A third breach of academic integrity may result in one or more of the following penalties, at the discretion of the executive dean/dean or associate dean:
  • Removal from a course with a grade of “0” or “F”;
  • Removal from a program;
  • Dismissal from the college for two academic years.
A third breach of academic integrity will be referred to the vice-president, Academic and may result in dismissal from the college for two academic years. If the student is dismissed from the college the office of the president will be notified. 6. Roles and responsibilities 6.1. It is the responsibility of the Office of vice-president, Academic to ensure this policy is fully implemented. 6.2. It is the faculty member`s responsibility to maintain academic integrity in the learning environment. The faculty member will attempt to discuss the alleged breach of academic integrity with the student(s) and will complete an Academic Integrity Alert form, as appropriate. It is the faculty member`s responsibility to submit the completed form to their executive dean/dean or associate dean with all accompanying information. 6.3. It is the responsibility of students to ensure they understand the Academic Integrity policy and procedure. 6.4. It is the responsibility of the executive dean/dean or associate dean to review the alleged breach of academic integrity, determine and communicate the appropriate consequence. 6.5. It is the responsibility of the campus support services to assist employees and students in the understanding this policy. 6.6. It is the responsibility of Strategic Enrolment Services to maintain the records associated with this policy. 7. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act considerations Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards have been considered in the development of this policy and procedure and it adheres to the principles outlined in the College’s commitment to accessibility as demonstrated by the Accessibility Plan (ADMIN-203). 8. Non-compliance implications Failure to comply with this policy could result in unearned academic advantage or credit, thereby damaging the quality of Durham College’s scholarship and reputation. 9. Communications plan A message will be posted on ICE alerting faculty and staff when new or revised policies and procedures are added to ICE. A message will be posted on MyCampus alerting students when new or revised policies and procedures are added. 10. Related forms, legislation or external resources
  • None.
View policy [PDF]

Academic Program Review and Renewal

ACAD-105

Introduction

1.1. Excellence in academic programming is a cornerstone of realizing the mission and vision for Durham College. As an integral component of quality assurance, Durham College utilizes a set of program performance measures and assessment tools to review and renew academic programs. The review and renewal process identifies areas for improvement and innovation, and ensures program responsiveness to economic and societal needs, as well as the expectations of students and employers. 1.2. The Government of Ontario requires colleges to undertake regular and comprehensive review of the quality of their academic programs to ensure that programs are appropriate to the credential and the outcomes expected of the graduate; are consistent with the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities (MTCU) program standards (where they exist), the Minister’s Binding Policy Directive, Framework for Programs of Instruction; the Ontario Qualifications Framework; the standards and requirements of the College Quality Assurance Audit Process (CQAAP) ; and the degree level standards as articulated in the Post-secondary Education Quality Assessment Board (PEQAB) Handbook for Ontario Colleges (Post-secondary Education Choice and Excellence Act, 2000). 1.3. Durham College quality assurance and program review processes are designed to support the standards and requirements of the Ontario College Quality Assurance Service (OCQAS) and the College Quality Assurance Audit Process (CQAAP).

1. Introduction 1.1. Excellence in academic programming is a cornerstone of realizing the mission and vision for Durham College. As an integral component of quality assurance, Durham College utilizes a set of program performance measures and assessment tools to review and renew academic programs. The review and renewal process identifies areas for improvement and innovation, and ensures program responsiveness to economic and societal needs, as well as the expectations of students and employers. 1.2. The Government of Ontario requires colleges to undertake regular and comprehensive review of the quality of their academic programs to ensure that programs are appropriate to the credential and the outcomes expected of the graduate; are consistent with the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities (MTCU) program standards (where they exist), the Minister’s Binding Policy Directive, Framework for Programs of Instruction; the Ontario Qualifications Framework; the standards and requirements of the College Quality Assurance Audit Process (CQAAP) ; and the degree level standards as articulated in the Post-secondary Education Quality Assessment Board (PEQAB) Handbook for Ontario Colleges (Post-secondary Education Choice and Excellence Act, 2000). 1.3. Durham College quality assurance and program review processes are designed to support the standards and requirements of the Ontario College Quality Assurance Service (OCQAS) and the College Quality Assurance Audit Process (CQAAP). 2. Purpose This policy and procedure informs the need for regular program review and provides a standard framework for the review and renewal of all academic programs offered at Durham College. The review and renewal process ensures that programs and curriculum are continuously assessed against program standards and undergo continuous assessment. Review outcomes will improve program delivery and design and ensure that programming is consistent with the College priorities and mission including determining the currency of the program within the existing program mix at Durham College. 3. Definitions Refer to Durham College’s Standard Definitions. 4. Policy statements 4.1. The intent of program review and renewal is to continuously assess and improve the quality of Durham College programs to ensure program relevance and teaching and learning excellence. 4.2. Overall alignment of academic programs, policy and procedures with CQAAP standards and requirements will ensure continuous improvement of the quality of the teaching and learning experience in the delivery of programs. 4.3. Academic programs of instruction that are funded through a MTCU operating grant are subject to program review and renewal every five to seven years. 4.4. For inter-institutional programs that are partnered with an Ontario university, the Ontario Universities Council on Quality Assurance (OUCQA) program review processes will apply (e.g.: Collaborative BScN degree program). 4.5. Externally accredited programs are subject to review as aligned with the external regulatory requirements, in addition to the Annual Program Review (APR) and Comprehensive Program Review (CPR) processes. Documents and/or assessments required by the accreditation review will be accepted as meeting the criteria for the CPR where it is deemed to be duplicate and within reasonable timelines to the comprehensive review cycle. 4.6. New academic programs will be scheduled into the CPR roster subject to the completion of all semesters/year levels. This will not exceed five years from the first student intake unless the graduate data is not yet available. 4.7. Each year, the Academic Leadership Team (ALT) will designate and approve a schedule of academic programs for review and renewal. The CPR roster will ensure that programs are reviewed within a window of five to seven years. The roster of programs under review may be altered by the vice-president, academic (VPA). Revisions to the roster will be approved through consultation between the appropriate Executive Dean/Dean/Director. 4.8. Each year, all academic programs will complete an APR exercise, using the APR report template. 4.9. During the comprehensive and annual review of an academic program, any program that is also delivered in an alternate format (e.g. online, part-time); and/or also delivered by the Centre for Professional and Part-time Learning will be also be included in the process. A representative from the Centre for Professional and Part-time Learning will be assigned by the Director to the Program Review Team. The recommendations from the program review will be implemented with all delivery formats. 4.10. The recommendations resulting from the review and renewal process will be documented, communicated and implemented in a timely manner and as resourced within the College priorities. 4.11. CPR external assessors (curriculum and labour market experts) will be ‘armslength’ from the program (i.e. not Program Advisory Committee members, no working or professional relationship with the program under review within the previous five years). 5. Procedure 5.1. Annual Program Review 5.1.1. Each Spring, the Executive Dean/Dean/Director will review the APR process with the Program Coordinator and Program Team (all faculty teaching in the program). 5.1.2. The APR report will be completed by the Executive Dean/Dean/Director and the Program Team, as determined by the template criteria. 5.1.3. The APR report will be completed by June 15 of each year. 5.1.4. The APR report will be reviewed and signed by the executive dean/dean/director and submitted to the Office of the Vice-President, Academic. The Manager, Program Review and Renewal may provide feedback before submission to the Associate Vice-President, Academic (AVPA). 5.1.5. The AVPA will review and approve the APR report, along with recommendations and action plan. 5.1.6. The Executive Dean/Dean/Director will provide an update on the recommendations and action plan, at the six-month point, to the Manager, Program Review and Renewal. 5.1.7. The AVPA will review and approve the status update. 5.1.8. The Manager, Program Review and Renewal will support the process and ensure submission of the completed APR template and the six-month status update. 5.1.9. The APR template questions and criteria will be reviewed annually by the Office of the Vice-President, Academic and may be updated for relevancy and to support College priorities. 5.2. Comprehensive Program Review 5.2.1. Annually, the Academic Leadership Team (ALT) will designate a number of academic programs for review and renewal. 5.2.2. The roster of programs scheduled for review and renewal will be posted electronically on the Office of the Vice-President, Academic ICE page. 5.2.3. The Executive Dean/Dean/Director assigns a Program Review Team. 5.2.4. An orientation meeting, led by the Executive Dean/Dean/Associate Dean/Director, will be scheduled to provide an overview of the process and outcomes to be achieved by the Program Review Team. The Manager, Program Review and Renewal will attend and assist in planning and orienting the Program Review Team. 5.2.5. The CPR process will be informed through the analysis of a variety of program performance information: a) Provincial program standards (where applicable); b) Curriculum mapping reports; c) Completed APR templates; d) Program Health Matrix Report Cards (PHM); e) Key Performance Indicator (KPI) Report Cards; f) Program Retention Reports; g) Program Information Package (PIP); h) Feedback from stakeholders: students, graduates, Program Advisory Committee (PAC) members and employers; i) External Assessment Report/Survey (where applicable); j) Program faculty credentials, experience, professional development; and k) Accreditation Status (for relevant programs). 5.2.6. PIP content will be determined in consultation with the Executive Dean/Dean/Director, the Office of the Vice-President, Academic and the Office of Research Services, Innovation and Entrepreneurship (ORSIE). 5.2.7. The Centre for Academic and Faculty Enrichment (CAFE) will facilitate a curriculum review and mapping session that will include an on-line mapping survey to assist program teams to review program standards, outcomes, Essential Employability Skills, teaching-learning strategies, and evaluation/assessment methods. 5.2.8. One student focus group per program will be facilitated to collect feedback on the student experience. The focus group will consist of students (seven to twelve participants) across year level(s), balanced by gender, age and other variables, as appropriate. The student focus group will be facilitated by the Manager, Program Review and Renewal (or designate). 5.2.9. Employer and industry feedback will be solicited using a focus group (five to seven participants), a survey tool or external assessment as deemed appropriate by the executive dean/dean/director. 5.2.10. Graduate and PAC feedback will be solicited as deemed appropriate by the Executive Dean/Dean/Director (e.g.: focus group, survey, inclusion in the external assessor site visit). 5.2.11. In selected programs, external assessors will be contracted to provide feedback on the program. Assessors will be selected for their academic and labour market expertise. 5.2.12. Using the program performance information, the Program Review Team will identify strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and trends and forward them to the Manager, Program Review and Renewal. The Manager, program review and renewal will facilitate a discussion meeting to develop the draft set of recommendations for program improvement. 5.2.13. An assigned faculty member (assigned by the Executive Dean) will prepare a final report with recommendations and submit to the Executive Dean/Dean/Director for review and approval. 5.2.14. The Executive Dean/Dean/Director will review the final report and forward to the Manager, Program Review and Renewal. The AVPA will review the final report prior to submission to the Vice-President, Academic for approval. 5.2.15. A summary of the CPR findings, will be reported to the Academic Council by an assigned faculty member (assigned by the Executive Dean). The final report will be posted on ICE. 5.2.16. The Office of the Vice-President, Academic will monitor the completion and implementation of the recommendations. 5.2.17. A six-month status update on recommendation implementation will be provided to the Manager, Program Review and Renewal. 5.3. Procedure – Targeted Program Review 5.3.1. The Executive Dean/Dean/Director of a program will determine, in consultation with the Office of the Vice-President, Academic, if a program should undergo a targeted program review. 5.3.2. Review requirements (criteria, data collection/assessments) and focus will be determined by the Executive Dean/Dean/Director. 5.3.3. Review results and Action Plan (if developed) will be shared with the Manager, Program Review and Renewal and folded into the subsequent annual or comprehensive review. 6. Roles and responsibilities 6.1. Vice-president, Academic 6.1.1. Overseeing Durham College’s quality assurance processes; 6.1.2. Approving the hiring of up to two external assessors for CPR; 6.1.3. Approving the CPR Roster; and 6.1.4. Approving the CPR final report and recommendations generated from the program review process. 6.2. Executive Deans/Deans/Directors 6.2.1. Overseeing the quality of the programs offered by their respective Schools; 6.2.2. Overseeing the APR and CPR program review and renewal process ensuring that timelines and deadlines are met; 6.2.3. Selecting the faculty members assigned to the CPR; 6.2.4. Providing time for program review on the Standard Workload Formula (SWF) for participating faculty; 6.2.5. Providing orientation to the review process; 6.2.6. Collaborating with the Program Review Team to support compliance with the program review process; 6.2.7. Providing input into the decision and selection with respect to external assessor(s), as appropriate; 6.2.8. Completing of the relevant CPR and APR appendix templates (e.g.: faculty names and highest credential attained); 6.2.9. Submitting the CPR final report and recommendations to the Office of the Vice-President, Academic, with inclusion of a program feasibility statement; 6.2.10. Collaborating with the AVPA in overseeing the implementation of recommendations, which includes submission of a six-month status update; and, 6.2.11. For academic programs delivered by a School and the Centre for Professional and Part-time Learning, the Director, Centre for Professional and Part-time Learning is responsible for ensuring representation and input from the Centre for Professional and Part-time Learning. 6.3. Director, CAFE and staff 6.3.1. Facilitating the program mapping process and developing the final curriculum mapping report; and 6.3.2. Coordinating the development of the curriculum mapping report and forwarding final report to the Executive Dean/Dean/Director and the Manager, Program Review and Renewal. 6.4. Program Review Team 6.4.1. Accessing and reviewing the program performance information; 6.4.2. Assisting in the completion of the APR templates 6.4.3. Participating in scheduled program review meetings; 6.4.4. Providing input in the program review process (e.g. program mapping, curriculum review/revisions, SWOT analysis, draft reports, etc.); and 6.4.5. Developing and implementing the recommendations for program improvement. 6.5. Program Review Facilitator 6.5.1. Providing academic leadership for the Program Review Team; 6.5.2. Scheduling and chairing of Program Review Team meetings; 6.5.3. Identifying students, graduates, employers and PAC members to obtain their feedback. Assisting with identifying two external assessors (as needed); 6.5.4. Collaborating to complete program self-assessment exercises; The faculty member assigned to the CPR process is responsible for: 6.5.5. Preparing the final report for submission to the executive dean/dean/director within the established timelines; and 6.5.6. Presenting the CPR outcomes to Academic Council. 6.6. Associate Vice-President, Academic 6.6.1. Overseeing the implementation of recommendations for improvement and ensuring implementation in a timely manner. 6.7. Manager, Program Review and Renewal 6.7.1. Leading and facilitating teams to conduct program review; 6.7.2. Collaborating with the Program Review Team to ensure feedback is solicited from employers, graduates and Program Advisory Committee members; 6.7.3. Facilitating student focus groups and external focus groups, ensuring completion of summary report; 6.7.4. Facilitating discussion and analysis (e.g. SWOT) of program performance information (or ensuring a designate is assigned), and completion of summary discussion documents; 6.7.5. Be the key contact to the selected external assessors and internal college services (H.R., payroll) to facilitate a site visit and in receiving assessment report(s); 6.7.6. Scheduling the CPR outcomes presentation to Academic Council; 6.7.7. Maintaining and updating the CPR roster of programs, as per ALT and the VPA; 6.7.8. Providing unbiased support and facilitation, without advocating for any particular position on the program review results, and integrating all views, as appropriate; 6.7.9. Maintaining (in consultation with the Office of the Vice-President, Academic) program review documents to guide and support the review such as templates, process guides, webpages, etc.; and, 6.7.10. Preparing annual reports to communicate program review status and outcomes. 6.8. Manager, Institutional Research and Planning 6.8.1. Through consultation, determine information needs for the PIP; 6.8.2. Providing program effectiveness reports (e.g. PHM, Retention) to support the APR and CPR processes; and 6.8.3. Presenting a summary of the PIP to the Program Review Team. 6.9. External Assessors 6.9.1. Conducting a site/campus visit to review the program of studies, curriculum, labs and field placement component of the program and to consult with students, reviewing feedback from recent graduates, Program Advisory Committee members and employers to make an assessment on the quality of the program; and 6.9.2. Providing a summary report of their findings to the Manager, Program Review and Renewal and the Executive Dean/Dean/Director. 7. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act considerations Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards have been considered in the development of this policy and procedure and it adheres to the principles outlined in the College’s commitment to accessibility as demonstrated by the Accessibility Plan (ADMIN-203). 8. Non-compliance implications Non-compliance puts the College at risk. Risks may include, but are not limited to the delivery of programs that do not meet the Minister’s Binding Policy Directive – Frameworks for Programs of Instruction; unsatisfactory feedback from students, graduates, and employers; loss of program credibility and reputation; and below-standard/not-met ratings in performance indicators, external program accreditation or quality assurance audits. 9. Communications plan
  • A message will be posted on ICE alerting employees when new or revised policies and procedures are added to ICE.
  • A message will be posted on MyCampus alerting students when new or revised policies and procedures are added.
10. Related forms, legislation or external resources
  • Ontario Qualifications Framework
  • Durham College Annual Program Review
  • Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities - Minister’s Binding Policy Directives: Framework for Programs of Instruction
  • Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities Program Standards
  • Ontario College Quality Assurance Service – CQAAP Standards
  • Post-Secondary Education Quality Assessment Board Handbook for Ontario Colleges.
VIEW POLICY [PDF]

Academic Progression

ACAD-127

Introduction

Durham College is committed to a consistent, equitable and transparent process that facilitates the successful progression of a student through their chosen program to graduation.

1. Introduction Durham College is committed to a consistent, equitable and transparent process that facilitates the successful progression of a student through their chosen program to graduation. 2. Purpose This policy and procedure is designed to clearly define the requirements necessary for a student to progress through an academic program at Durham College. 3. Definitions Refer to Durham College’s Standard Definitions. 4. Policy statements 4.1. When students are admitted to a program they are assigned to the current version of the Program of Study (POS). 4.2. When a student repeats a course they have failed, the grade obtained on each occasion will be recorded on the student’s academic record, but only the higher grade will be included in the final calculation of the student's PGPA. 4.3. The permission of the Executive Dean/Dean or Associate Dean is required to allow a student to repeat a course within a POS a third (or more) time, as detailed in the appropriate program guide. 4.4. When students return from academic suspension or a voluntary absence, they follow their original POS. 4.5. Students will be informed in their program guide of the criteria required for the successful progression through the POS. 4.7. Each semester, the academic results of each student will be evaluated and an academic progression status will be assigned which will define their ability to proceed through the POS. Academic progression status is dependent on SGPA. 4.8. Students will be advised of their academic progression status at the end of each semester via the MyCampus student portal. 4.9. The determination of academic progression status is dependent upon the submission of all grades in an academic semester. This status will be recalculated for all grades submitted after the published deadlines (as per the academic calendar). 4.10. Students who fail to meet the progression criteria must meet with their academic school to establish an individualized academic plan. 4.11. Financial Aid could be impacted by academic progression status through a POS. 4.12. Students have the right to appeal academic decisions pertaining to academic withdrawal through the College-level Grade Appeal policy and procedure (ACAD-111). 5. Procedure 5.1. Academic Progression – Professional and Part-time Learning Students 5.1.1. Once final grades are exported to the Student Information System (Banner) at the end of an academic semester, Professional and Part-time Learning will:
  • Review all students with a failing grade in any course for the semester;
  • Identify all students who have failed any three courses (in total) throughout their academic history;
  • Provide Strategic Enrolment Services (SES) with a list of these students to place an academic hold on their record; and
  • send an email to each student affected, advising them of the steps taken and that they should meet with their student advisor to determine options available to them.
5.2. Repeating Courses - Full-time and Part-time Post-Secondary Students, Apprenticeship Students 5.2.1. If the Executive Dean/Dean or Associate Dean allows the student to repeat the course a third (or more) time, the academic school will:
  • register the student in the course; and
  • assign the academic status of the student as “On Probation”. If not approved, the academic school will:
  • send an e-mail to the student advising them that they are not eligible to repeat the course and that their academic progression status is Permanent Withdrawal; and
  • update the student’s academic progression status is to Permanent Withdrawal.
5.3. Academic Progression - Full-time and Part-time Post-Secondary Students, Apprenticeship Students 5.3.1. Determination of Academic Progression Status Once final grades are exported to the Student Information System (Banner) at the end of an academic semester, SES will run an automated process which will:
  • calculate the SGPA for all full-time students in the most recently completed academic semester; and
  • assign one of the three academic progression status values; and
  • generate a report for each academic school that will provide the breakdown of each academic progression status.
The academic progression status reports will be distributed electronically to each school office by SES. 5.3.2. Notification of Academic Progression Status The following actions will take place, depending on academic progression status: Good Standing Students will be assigned this status and will be sent an email that will advise them that they eligible to continue to the next level of study in their POS. On Probation i) First Instance A student who is placed On Probation for the first time will be deemed eligible to continue to the next level of study in their POS, if they have the required prerequisite subjects. The automated academic progression process will send an email to the student advising them of their academic status. ii) Second Instance For any student who is placed On Probation for a second time in the same program; the automated academic progression process will:
  • place a registration hold on the student’s record;
  • withdraw the student from all courses in which the student had pre-registered; and
  • send an e-mail to the student advising them that they are required to meet with their student advisor in order to continue in their POS.
If the student does not meet with their student advisor before the last day to register for the subsequent semester, the academic school will advise SES who will do the following:
  • update the student’s academic progression status to Academic Suspension; and
  • withdraw the student from the subsequent academic semester, including all courses in which the student had pre-registered; and
  • process a refund for all tuition fees paid for the subsequent academic semester; and
  • send an email to the student advising them of the steps taken and that they should meet with their student advisor to determine options available to them.
iii) Third Instance For any student who is On Probation for a third time in the same program; the automated process will change the student’s academic progression status to Academic Withdrawal. For all students with an academic progression status of Academic Withdrawal, SES will:
  • withdraw the student from the subsequent academic semester, including all courses in which the student had pre-registered; and
  • process a refund for all tuition fees paid for the subsequent academic semester; and
  • send an email to the student advising them of the steps taken and that they should meet with their student advisor to determine options available to them.
5.3.3. Academic Suspension i) First Instance Any student who assigned an Academic Suspension status for the first time will be deemed to be eligible to continue to the next level of study in their POS, if they have the required prerequisite subjects. The automated academic progression process will send an email to the student advising them of their academic status. ii) Second Instance For any student who is assigned an Academic Suspension status for a second time in the same program; the automated process will change the student’s academic progression status to Academic Withdrawal. For all students with an academic progression status of Academic Withdrawal, SES will:
  • withdraw the student from the subsequent academic semester, including all courses in which the student had pre-registered; and
  • process a refund for all tuition fees paid for the subsequent academic semester; and
  • send an email to the student advising them of the steps taken and that they should meet with their student advisor to determine options available to them.
For all students with an academic progression status of Academic Withdrawal, the student’s academic school will meet with each student that contacts them to discuss their options. Interim Semester
  1. If a student opts to enroll in the Interim Semester option, the student advisor will connect the student to the School of Interdisciplinary Studies.
  2. A “Program Transfer Request” form will be completed by the School of Interdisciplinary Studies.
  3. The student will bring the completed “Program Transfer Request” form to SES which will:
    • re-activate the student record; and
    • generate a fee statement to allow fees to be paid; and
    • set the student’s academic progression status to On Probation.
Part-Time Studies
  1. If a student opts to continue in their POS as a part-time student, the student advisor will work with the student to develop a customized timetable with fewer courses.
Apply for Admission To a New Program
  1. If a student opts to pursue a new program, the student advisor will complete a “Program Withdrawal Request” form.
  2. The student advisor will submit the completed “Program Withdrawal Request” form to SES which will:
    • update the student record to withdrawn;
    • if applicable, generate a refund.
3. The domestic students will apply and pay all applicable fees through ontariocolleges.ca for their new program of interest and follow through the admissions process. International students will apply and pay all applicable fees through the International Student Application Portal for their new program of interest and follow through the admissions process. 5.4. Re-Admission After Academic Withdrawal After sitting out for two consecutive academic semesters, a student can apply for re-admission to the same program (under their original POS) by:
  • arranging an appointment with their student advisor; and
  • completing a “Return to Full-time Studies” form.
If approved, the form will be sent by the student advisor to SES which will:
  • re-activate the student record;
  • generate a fee statement to allow fees to be paid;
  • ensure that the original POS is attached to the student record; and
  • set the student’s academic progression status to On Probation.
When the student has made arrangements for the payment of their fees and the appropriate registration window opens, the student will be allowed to self-register into their timetable. Students who are re-admitted after they have been academically withdrawn must clear the On Probation status in order to continue in their POS. Failure to clear the On Probation status at the end of the first semester following the resumption of studies will result in permanent withdrawal from the program. 5.5. Re-Admission After Permanent Withdrawal After permanent withdrawal, a student can apply for admission to another program through ontariocolleges.ca. 6. Roles and responsibilities 6.1. It is the responsibility of the Vice-President, Academic, in collaboration with the Executive Director/Registrar to ensure this policy and procedure is fully implemented. 6.2. It is the responsibility of Strategic Enrolment Services to ensure that the automated academic progression process is run each semester, and that student records are updated as outlined in this policy and procedure. 6.3. It is the responsibility of the academic school to administer any program specific progression rules. 6.4. It is the responsibility of the student to initiate re-application to their program of study after academic withdrawal. 7. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act considerations Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards have been considered in the development of this policy and procedure and it adheres to the principles outlined in the College’s commitment to accessibility as demonstrated by the Accessibility Plan (ADMIN-203). 8. Non-compliance implications Non-compliance puts the College at risk of academic appeals. 9. Communications plan
  • A message will be posted on ICE alerting employees when new or revised policies and procedures are added to ICE.
  • A message will be posted on MyCampus alerting students when new or revised policies and procedures are added.
10. Related forms, legislation or external resources
  • Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities - Minister’s Binding Policy Directive on Framework for Programs of Instruction
VIEW POLICY [PDF]

Accessible Format Course Materials for Students with Disabilities

ACAD-117

Introduction

Recognizing that universal design is the approach to inclusion that is most respectful of the dignity of persons with disabilities, this document is designed to inform and guide the provision of reasonable academic accommodations through accessible format in the context of the essential requirements of the College’s courses and programs. This policy is consistent with the Durham College Accessibility Policy (ADMIN-203), as well as the Academic Accommodations for Students with Disabilities policy and procedure (ADMIN-225) and with the College’s commitment to creating a campus community that is inclusive of all individuals. This document is designed to inform and guide in the provision of accessible format course materials for students registered with the Access and Support Centre (ASC).

1. Introduction Recognizing that universal design is the approach to inclusion that is most respectful of the dignity of persons with disabilities, this document is designed to inform and guide the provision of reasonable academic accommodations through accessible format in the context of the essential requirements of the College’s courses and programs. This policy is consistent with the Durham College Accessibility Policy (ADMIN-203), as well as the Academic Accommodations for Students with Disabilities policy and procedure (ADMIN-225) and with the College’s commitment to creating a campus community that is inclusive of all individuals. This document is designed to inform and guide in the provision of accessible format course materials for students registered with the Access and Support Centre (ASC). 2. Purpose The purpose of this policy and procedure is to establish standards for providing accessible format course materials to students registered with the ASC. 3. Definitions Refer to Durham College’s Standard Definitions. 4. Policy statements 4.1. Employees will select the most vocationally appropriate and accessible option when choosing third party instructional materials thereby minimizing the need for students to request accommodation. 4.2. When employees develop new instructional materials they will use the principles of universal design (UDL). 4.3. As per the Durham College Academic Accommodations for Students with Disabilities policy ADMIN-225, students with disabilities may request to be considered for formal academic accommodation in accordance with the Ontario Human Rights Code, the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act and Durham College policy. 4.4. Accommodations required by students with disabilities may include the provision of course material in accessible format. Provision shall be given except in situations of undue hardship. 4.5. The nature and extent of accessible format course materials provided will be consistent with and supportive of the essential requirements of courses and programs. 4.6. Accessible format course material will be provided in a timely manner that respects the need for students with disabilities/exceptionalities to access course material simultaneously with their peers. 4.7. Employees shall work collaboratively to select and/or develop accessible course materials. 5. Procedure 5.1. When employees develop new instructional materials they will use the principles of UDL. 5.2. Course materials will be available in accessible formats to meet the needs of Durham College students with disabilities. In many cases, providing learning material in electronic format for students will enable students who use specialized software to access the material. 5.2.1. Course materials that may be converted into accessible formats include, but are not limited to:
  • Audio and video resources;
  • Course packs, PowerPoint slides and/or PDF files;
  • Pictures, graphics and/or diagrams;
  • Print articles, handouts, multimedia and/or website content;
  • Textbooks and/or custom publications; and
  • Tests, exams, quizzes, assignments and/or learning objects.
5.2.2. Accessible formats include, but are not limited to:
  • Electronic copies of presentation slides, class handouts;
  • Audio transcriptions;
  • Braille;
  • Closed-captioning, descriptive video and/or synchronized captioning;
  • Large print; and
  • Tactile graphics.
5.3. Requesting accessible format materials and student responsibilities: 5.3.1. It is the student’s responsibility to meet with an Accessibility Coach from the ASC to discuss their learning needs. 5.3.2. Students are expected to comply with timelines as per the academic calendar and with those timelines and/or processes stipulated by the ASC. 5.3.3. Students with disabilities are responsible for the purchase of all required student course materials for conversion to accessible formats where accessible formats are not immediately available. 5.4. Providing accessible format course materials and faculty responsibilities: 5.4.1. Faculty are responsible for working collaboratively with students and/or their Accessibility Coach(es) to facilitate the provision of course materials in accessible format. 5.4.2. Wherever possible, faculty will select and/or develop course materials that incorporate UDL principles. The Centre for Academic and Faculty Enrichment will provide education and support to faculty in selecting and developing materials that are based on UDL principles. 5.4.3. Where applicable, faculty should make the appropriate Accessibility Coach aware of any changes to the content and/or sequence of instruction detailed in course outlines. Failure to do so may delay the production of formatted materials. 5.4.4. Faculty are responsible for ensuring that copyright permission has been secured for all of their teaching and learning materials. Providers of accessible format materials will not service requests absent of copyright permission. Failure to do so may delay the production of accessible format materials. 5.4.5. Faculty can support the conversion of teaching and course materials to accessible formats by:
  • Avoiding the use of password protection on any teaching and learning materials provided to the ASC;
  • Limiting the use of print-based articles not available in electronic format;
  • Providing text in portrait presentation, instead of landscape presentation; and
  • Requesting an electronic copy of any custom publication used, and providing the ASC with the right to use the publication for the provision of accessible format materials.
5.5. Providing accessible format course materials and the ASC responsibilities: 5.5.1. The provision of accessible format materials is determined based on each student’s individual needs. 5.5.2. Eligibility for, and authorization of, the provision of course materials in accessible formats is determined by Accessibility Coaches in ASC. 5.5.3. Accessible format materials may be produced in ASC, or produced by an external source. Timelines for the production of accessible format materials from external sources, such as Braille and transcription, may delay the production of course materials. 6. Roles and responsibilities 6.1. The Vice-President, Academic is responsible for ensuring that the Accessible Format Course Materials for Students with Disabilities policy and procedure is fully implemented. 6.2. The Vice-President, Student Affairs is responsible for ensuring that the Accessible Format Course Materials for Students with Disabilities policy and procedure is fully implemented in accordance with Durham College Academic Accommodations for Students with Disabilities policy and procedure ADMIN-225. 6.3. It is the responsibility of faculty to work collaboratively with the student(s) and ASC to facilitate the delivery of course materials in accessible format. 6.4. Students are responsible for advising Durham College of a disability/exceptionality requiring accommodation and for providing sufficient information as to the student’s needs, restrictions and/or limitations. The student has a responsibility to respond to reasonable requests for information made by Durham College relevant to accommodation. 6.5. The student is further required to participate in discussions around possible accommodation solutions and to cooperate and participate in the accommodation process. The student must work with Durham College on an ongoing basis to assess, manage and update accommodations. 7. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act considerations Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards have been considered in the development of this policy and procedure and it adheres to the principles outlined in the College’s commitment to accessibility as demonstrated by the Accessibility Plan (ADMIN-203). 8. Non-compliance implications 8.1. Non-compliance with this policy may result in financial risk, legal costs and/or failure to achieve the College’s mission. 8.2. The Ontario government established an administrative monetary penalties scheme under AODA. The scheme allows a ministry director or a designate to issue an order against a person, organization or corporation to pay a penalty amount as a result of non-compliance with the AODA or the accessibility standards. The maximum penalty that could be issued to an individual is $2,000 per day and to an organization $15,000 per day. 8.3. Failure to comply with applicable federal and provincial legislation may lead to legal costs arising from potential lawsuits for non-compliance. 9. Communications plan
  • A message will be posted on ICE alerting employees when new or revised policies and procedures are added to ICE.
  • A message will be posted on MyCampus alerting students when new or revised policies and procedures are added.
10. Related forms, legislation or external resources
  • Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act 2005
  • Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
  • Ontario Human Rights Code
  • Ontario Regulation 429/07 (Accessibility Standards for Customer Service)
View policy [PDF]

Accommodations for Students with Disabilities

ADMIN-225

Introduction

Durham College values and actively promotes the right of all individuals, including those with disabilities, to have an equal opportunity to experience success in their academic endeavors with the institution. Durham College recognizes that successful learning outcomes are the result of shared responsibility and commitment on the part of all members of the Durham College Community.

1. Introduction Durham College values and actively promotes the right of all individuals, including those with disabilities, to have an equal opportunity to experience success in their academic endeavors with the institution. Durham College recognizes that successful learning outcomes are the result of shared responsibility and commitment on the part of all members of the Durham College Community. 2. Purpose The purpose of this policy is to identify college obligations to accommodate applicants and students with disabilities and to provide a framework for developing appropriate accommodation to the point of undue hardship. The policy also provides an effective and timely process for applicants and students to appeal accommodation decisions made under this policy. 3. Definitions Refer to Durham College’s Standard Definitions. 4. Policy statements 4.1. Guiding Principles 4.1.1. Each student has the right to access education in an environment that promotes individual dignity, equality, and respect. Durham College prohibits and will not tolerate discrimination or harassment on the basis of disability, or any other ground enumerated in the Ontario Human Rights Code. 4.1.2. Durham College focuses on the removal of barriers to education and services for students by designing facilities, systems, services and curricula in such a way that enhances accessibility. Durham College will accommodate students with disabilities requiring accommodation to the point of undue hardship. 4.1.3. Accommodation is intended to promote integration and full participation of persons with disabilities. 4.1.4. The needs of the students are accommodated in a manner that respects their dignity. 4.1.5. Willingness to explore all possible accommodation solutions is key to treating students with respect and dignity and appropriately accommodating a student’s disability. 4.1.6. As each person has unique needs, and accommodation is explored and provided on an individualized basis. 4.1.7. The accommodation process is a cooperative process, involving shared responsibilities among the student requesting accommodation and Durham College. 4.1.8. Once accommodation is provided, students are expected to meet the published learning outcomes and essential requirements of their academic programs. 4.2. Accommodation Principles 4.2.1. Durham College will accommodate qualified applicants with disabilities with respect to pre-admission requirements and processes, including for example, accommodations regarding pre-admission tests. 4.2.2. Students with disabilities who are admitted to Durham College’s programs will be accommodated to the point of undue hardship, regardless of their prospects for success in their program(s) or for finding employment post-graduation. 4.2.3. Where accommodation includes modification or waiver of a health or safety practice, Durham College will assess the resulting risk to the student and others on an objective basis. If accommodation would result in a significant or substantial health or safety risk to the student requesting accommodation, to other students, college employees or volunteers, or other members of Durham College community Durham College may deny the accommodation on the grounds of undue hardship. 4.2.4. Durham College is guided by procedure ADMIN 225.1 to facilitate the implementation of this policy. 4.2.5. Where a person with a disability cannot be accommodated in accordance with these principles, or where a person is found incapable of performing the essential requirements of a program or course, alternatives are explored with the student. Any arrangements regarding withdrawal must be approved by the vice president, Academic, or designate. Issues related to fees or possible fee refunds are decided by Student Enrollment Services. 4.2.6. Students with disabilities who appeal matters under Durham College’s appeal procedure (ADMIN 225.1) will be provided with reasonable accommodation to the point of undue hardship in the appeal process. 4.2.7. Durham College is not responsible for costs incurred by a party who retains a paid advisor. 5. Procedure 5.1. Accommodation Procedures 5.1.1. Durham College advises all students and applicants about the availability of services for students and applicants with disabilities. Information about the Access and Support Centre is included with offers of acceptance for post-secondary programs. The Professional and Part-time Learning calendar includes a general statement about the availability of assistance for students with a disability. Applicants can find information about the Access and Support Centre (ASC) in the course calendar. 5.1.2. Students and applicants are responsible for advising Durham College of a disability requiring accommodation by contacting the Access and Support Centre. Early identification is encouraged so that appropriate accommodations can be put in place by the beginning of the term and during the application process. 5.1.3. The Access and Support Centre meets with the student to collect necessary information. Students are responsible for providing the ASC with sufficient information as to their needs, restrictions and/or limitations, which may include medical documentation (“supporting documentation”). Students are also responsible for responding to reasonable requests for information made by Durham College for the purposes of accommodation. 5.1.4. Students who request accommodation are assigned to an accessibility coach or case manager who reviews the information collected and assesses the supporting documentation and appropriate accommodation solutions. The student is responsible for cooperating with and participating in the accommodation process, and is strongly encouraged to meet with the coach to consult about appropriate academic accommodation. 5.1.5. The accessibility coach prepares a written "Confidential Student Access Plan” that lists academic accommodations provided given the student's disability. The student's supporting documentation remains strictly confidential, is kept secure in the ASC, and is only shared with those individuals who are on a “need to know” basis for the purposes of accommodation. 5.1.6. The student is provided with copies of their personal "Confidential Student Access Plan." With the student’s permission the ASC will email each of the student’s professors with the plan or the student can choose to provide a copy to the professor in each class for which accommodation is required, to the extent it is necessary to do so for purposes of accommodation. It is recommended that the student meet personally with each professor to discuss the required accommodations. 5.1.7. If the appropriate academic accommodation is a reduced course load, the accommodation will be provided within the criteria of financial aid and enrolment procedures for Students with Disabilities Requiring a Reduced Course Load. (Strategic Enrolment Services internal policy and procedure. 5.2. Challenge of an Accommodation 5.2.1. If a student has a concern about the appropriateness of an academic accommodation provided, the student is responsible for raising the concern immediately with the faculty member who teaches the course. If the matter is not resolved within 5 business days, the student is responsible for raising the concern immediately with the assigned accessibility coach or with another coach at the ASC. The accessibility coach or another member of the ASC will meet with the student as soon as is reasonably possible to review the student's needs and accommodations, and attempt to resolve the student's concern. 5.2.2. If the student has a concern about the appropriateness of a nonacademic accommodation provided, the student is responsible for raising the concern immediately with the assigned accessibility coach or with another coach at the ASC. The accessibility coach or another member of the ASC will meet with the student as soon as is reasonably possible to review the student’s needs and accommodations, and attempt to resolve the student’s concern. 5.2.3. If the student’s concern is not resolved within 15 business days from the date the coach or ASC was first contacted, the student, the or the coach may refer the concern to the director, ASC for review. 5.2.4. The, director, ASC, within 7 business days of the referral, reviews and decides on the matter, and communicates Durham College accommodation decision to the student in writing. In the case of an academic accommodation, the academic advisor/associate dean for the student's program is consulted prior to the deciding of the matter. In the case of a non-academic accommodation, the Director, ASC will consult with the director of the relevant college department prior to the deciding of the matter. 5.2.5. If the student is not satisfied with the Durham College accommodation decision, the student may within five (5) business days initiate an appeal as outlined below. 5.3. Multiple Proceedings 5.3.1. Where the director, ASC determines that the subject matter of the complainant is more appropriately dealt with under another college policy, the director may, following consultation with the administrator of the other policy, exercise discretion to direct that the matter be dealt with and decided under the other college policy. 5.3.2. Where the subject matter of a complaint is also the subject matter of another procedure (e.g., an appeal of a grade under the Grade Appeals Policy and Procedure ACAD-111), the director, ASC works with the coordinator or administrator of the other policy to determine under which policy the matter is first addressed. 5.4. Appeal Procedure 5.4.1. A student may appeal a college accommodation decision to the vice president, Student Affairs (VPSA), within five (5) business days of receipt of a college accommodation decision from the ASC. In extenuating circumstances, an appeal filed beyond the five (5) business day limitation may be considered. All other time limits prescribed in this procedure may be extended with the written agreement of the parties. 5.5. Grounds for an Appeal The student may appeal the college accommodation decision on one or more of the following grounds: a) There was a serious procedural or factual error which was prejudicial to the student. b) New evidence or information, not available at the time of the college accommodation decision, has been discovered, which casts doubt on the correctness of the decision. c) The student disputes that the accommodation decision provides them with the appropriate accommodation of their disability. 5.6. Initiating the Appeal To initiate an appeal the student submits a written appeal to the VPSA, including all of the following information: a) Student name and number. b) Program name and number. c) A brief description of the college accommodation decision being appealed. d) A brief statement of the grounds for the appeal. e) The student's signature. f) The date of submission of the appeal. g) An attachment that provides details about the alleged serious procedural or factual errors, the new evidence/information, and how they caused prejudice to the student or rendered the decision incorrect, or the reasons for believing that the accommodation provided is inappropriate. 5.7. Appeal Process The Accommodation Appeals Committee will consist of the VPSA and the vice president Academic (VPA). The VPSA acknowledges receipt of the appeal and reviews the appeal to determine if the appeal has grounds based on the criteria set out above. If there are grounds for the appeal, it will proceed to the Accommodation Appeals Committee. 5.7.1. Review of Appeal The appeal process will be initiated within 10 business days of receipt of the appeal. The Accommodation Appeals Committee will: a) Meet with the student and provide an opportunity for the student to outline the reason for the appeal by elaborating on any new evidence/information or perceived procedural irregularity; b) Clarify any issues raised and identify any additional parties who need to be consulted to be able to make an informed decision; c) Provide the director, ASC and the accessibility coach with the opportunity to respond to the student's submissions; and, d) Provide the student with an opportunity to reply to the college's submissions. 5.7.2. Guiding Principles In considering the submissions of the parties, the Accommodation Appeals Committee is guided by the following principles: a) In determining questions of fact, including allegations of serious procedural or factual error or new evidence/information that is alleged not to have been available at the time of the college accommodation decision and is alleged to cast doubt on the correctness of the decision, the Accommodations Appeals Committee decides on a balance of probabilities (i.e., the evidence shows that it is more likely than not that the alleged fact is true or not), b) Decisions of the Accommodation Appeals Committee: In determining whether the college accommodation decision was appropriate the Accommodation Appeals Committee may determine:
  • That the accommodation was reasonable in all of the relevant circumstances.
  • That the appropriate accommodations have not been applied in all relevant circumstances, and the appropriate accommodation must be implemented.
  • That there was a procedural error and the matter must be returned to the director, ASC for a redetermination.
  • That the new evidence/information impacts the appropriateness of the accommodation provided, and the matter must be returned to the director, ASC for a redetermination
The Accommodation Appeals committee shall provide a written decision to the student who filed the appeal within 15 business days of the appeal being filed. 5.8. Protection from Reprisal In order to protect individuals who make use of this policy or participate in procedures under this policy, Durham College prohibits reprisal or threat of reprisal against these individuals. Individuals who violate these provisions may be subject to discipline or other corrective action under the Employee Code of Conduct policy EMPL 317. 6. Roles and responsibilities 6.1. The Vice-President, Student Affairs is primarily responsible for overseeing and implementing Durham College’s policies on accommodation. 6.2. Durham College will accept requests for accommodation in good faith unless there are legitimate reasons for not doing so. 6.3. Durham College will investigate all potential solutions and approaches to accommodation requests, and Durham College will keep records of accommodations requested and steps taken. 6.4. Durham College will respond to accommodation requests in a timely manner and will maintain confidentiality to the extent possible in the circumstances. 6.5. Durham College may obtain expert advice or opinion where necessary for purposes of accommodation. 6.6. Students are responsible for advising Durham College of a disability requiring accommodation and for providing sufficient information as to the student’s needs, restrictions and/or limitations. The student has a responsibility to respond to reasonable requests for information made by Durham College relevant to accommodation. 6.7. The student is further required to participate in discussions around possible accommodation solutions and to cooperate and participate in the accommodation process. The student must work with Durham College on an ongoing basis to assess, manage and update accommodations. 6.8. Information about student and staff responsibilities are found in the Accommodation for Students with Disabilities Procedure ADMIN 225.1. 7. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act considerations Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards have been considered in the development of this policy and procedure and it adheres to the principles outlined in the College’s commitment to accessibility as demonstrated by the Accessibility Plan (ADMIN-203). 8. Non-compliance implications An Administrative Monetary Penalties scheme is being established under AODA. The scheme will allow a director or a designate to issue an order against a person, organization or corporation to pay a penalty amount as a result of non-compliance with the AODA or the accessibility standards. The maximum penalty that could be issued to an individual or an organization is $50,000. There are significant costs to implementing the Accessibility Policy, however, failure to comply with applicable federal and provincial legislation may lead to legal costs arising from potential lawsuits for non-compliance. 9. Communications plan
  • An article will be placed on the employee intranet (ICE) with accompanying policy for campus awareness.
  • New employees will be made aware of the policy as part of their orientation.
  • Students will be made aware through admissions material, ongoing class presentations, training sessions, awareness initiatives and events.
  • Policy will be included in training with Student Association leaders and other student groups on an ongoing basis.
10. Related forms, legislation or external resources 
  • Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005 S.O. 2005
  • Accessibility Standards for Customer Service, O.Reg. 429/07
  • Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, 1982
  • Durham College Campus Accessibility Plan
  • Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act RSO 1990, c.F.31
  • Human Rights Code R.S.O. 1990, c.H.19
  • Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation, O.Reg.191/11
  • Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2001, S.O. 2001, c.32
  • Ontario Human Rights Commission: Guidelines on Accessible Education (Approved by the Commission September 29, 2004)
  • Personal Health Information Protection Act (PHIPA) 2004. S.O. 2004, c.3, Schedule A.
VIEW POLICY [PDF]

Aegrotat Standing

ACAD-110

Introduction

Durham College strives to ensure that students succeed in a challenging, yet supportive learning environment. In order to meet community, industry, partnership and government requirements, Durham College evaluates students on a learning outcomes basis to ensure graduates are competent to practice in their fields. Pursuant to our mission, vision and values, supporting students in exceptional circumstances balances academic integrity with student success.

1. Introduction Durham College strives to ensure that students succeed in a challenging, yet supportive learning environment. In order to meet community, industry, partnership and government requirements, Durham College evaluates students on a learning outcomes basis to ensure graduates are competent to practice in their fields. Pursuant to our mission, vision and values, supporting students in exceptional circumstances balances academic integrity with student success. 2. Purpose This policy and procedure provides a framework for the consideration of student requests for course credit in exceptional circumstances, whereby a student may demonstrate satisfactory performance without being able to complete all course and/or program requirements due to extenuating personal hardship. 3. Definitions Refer to Durham College’s Standard Definitions. 4. Policy statements 4.1. Students must apply for Aegrotat Standing consideration within 10 business days from the release of final grades (as per the academic calendar). 4.2. Aegrotat Standing will only be considered once all other options to address the student’s situation have been exhausted. 4.3. Not all courses may be eligible for an Aegrotat Standing due to factors including, but not limited to, external accreditation, collaborative programming, apprenticeship, skills-based coursework and field placement/practicum. 4.4. Exceptional circumstances that may warrant the designation of Aegrotat Standing include, but are not limited to injury, illness and/or bereavement. Supporting documentation will be required. 4.5. To be eligible for Aegrotat Standing, a student cannot have withdrawn from the course(s). 4.6. Once a course(s) has been assigned Aegrotat Standing, there are no further options for reassessment. 4.7. Pending the outcome of the Aegrotat Standing consideration process, a student will continue to be enrolled in any upper level course(s), which have a prerequisite for which they are seeking Aegrotat Standing. 4.8. Courses assigned an Aegrotat Standing are not included in the calculation of a student’s SGPA or PGPA, and are not eligible for credit transfer. 5. Procedure 5.1. Requesting Aegrotat standing 5.1.1. A request for Aegrotat Standing must be submitted in writing by the student, using the Aegrotat Standing Consideration form, to their school office within 10 business days from the release of final grades (as per the academic calendar). 5.1.2. It is the responsibility of the student to provide documentation, where available, in support of their request. Individuals requesting Aegrotat Standing are responsible for any costs incurred with respect to obtaining documentation. 5.2. Determining Aegrotat Standing 5.2.1. In consultation with the appropriate faculty, the Executive Dean/Dean or Associate Dean will review the submitted documentation and grant or decline Aegrotat Standing. 5.2.2. The Executive Dean/Dean or Associate Dean will provide a written decision to the student within five business days from the date the form is received. 5.2.3. Where a request for Aegrotat Standing has been denied, the requester may appeal the decision, as per the College’s Grade Appeal policy and procedure. 5.3. Documenting Aegrotat Standing 5.3.1. The Executive Dean/Dean or Associate Dean will document their decision on the Aegrotat Standing Consideration form and will send the completed form and submitted documentation to Strategic Enrolment Services for final processing. 5.3.2. If the request for Aegrotat Standing consideration is approved, Strategic Enrolment Services will:
  • Update the final grades for all courses where the Aegrotat Standing has been approved to a grade of AEG.
  • Recalculate the student’s SGPA and PGPA to reflect these grade changes.
  • Advise the student via DC mail that a change has been made to their academic record.
If the request for Aegrotat Standing consideration is denied, Strategic Enrolment Services will:
  • Review the student’s current enrolment, and de-register the student from any courses where the student was unsuccessful in a prerequisite course.
  • Advise the student via DC mail that a change has been made to their timetable.
5.3.3. Strategic Enrolment Services will scan the form and submitted documentation and attach it to the student file in the Student Information System. 6. Roles and responsibilities 6.1. It is the responsibility of the Vice-President, Academic in collaboration with the Executive Director/Registrar, Strategic Enrolment Services to ensure that the Aegrotat Standing policy and procedure is fully implemented. 6.2. It is a student’s responsibility to comply with all requirements of the Aegrotat policy and procedure, including, but not limited to meeting process deadlines and providing appropriate supporting documentation. 6.3. It is the responsibility of the Executive Dean/Dean or Associate Dean to grant or decline the application for Aegrotat Standing and inform the student of the decision in writing, within the established timelines. 6.4. It is the responsibility of the Executive Dean/Dean or Associate Dean to submit the Aegrotat Standing Consideration form to the Office of Strategic Enrolment Services. 6.5. It is the responsibility of the Office of Strategic Enrolment Services to manage and retain all Aegrotat Standing records. 7. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act considerations Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards have been considered in the development of this policy and procedure and it adheres to the principles outlined in the College’s commitment to accessibility as demonstrated by the Accessibility Plan (ADMIN-203). 8. Non-compliance implications Failure to comply with this policy could impact the academic success of a student experiencing exceptional circumstances during a set evaluation period of time. 9. Communications plan
  • A message will be posted on ICE alerting employees when new or revised policies and procedures are added to ICE.
  • A message will be posted on MyCampus alerting students when new or revised policies and procedures are added.
10. Related forms, legislation or external resources
  • Aegrotat Standing Consideration Form
View policy [PDF]

Articulation Agreements

ACAD-125

Introduction

Through formal partnerships and articulation agreements with institutions across Ontario, Canada and abroad, Durham College is dedicated to helping graduates pursue further education without limitation or repetition. Formal articulation agreements allow students to receive guaranteed credit transfer toward a relevant program at a partner institution.

1. Introduction Through formal partnerships and articulation agreements with institutions across Ontario, Canada and abroad, Durham College is dedicated to helping graduates pursue further education without limitation or repetition. Formal articulation agreements allow students to receive guaranteed credit transfer toward a relevant program at a partner institution. 2. Purpose This policy and procedure details the process that will be followed to formulate and promote articulation agreements and establish further education opportunities for Durham College. 3. Definitions Refer to Durham College’s Standard Definitions. 4. Policy statements 4.1. The intent of an articulation agreement is to provide opportunities for graduates to pursue further education with maximum recognition of prior learning. 4.2. In all articulation agreements, the College should be referred to as “The Durham College of Applied Arts and Technology.” If an articulation agreement pertains to only one Durham College academic school, the title of the school should also be identified in the articulation agreement. 4.3. As per the Schedule of Authority, articulation agreements shall be accompanied by a Contract Authorization and Risk Assessment form (CARAF) with first approval from the initiating Dean, second approval from the Vice-President, Academic and final execution from the College President. The College President will also be responsible for signing all articulation agreements. 4.4. The Director, Student Recruitment and Admissions Services will be made aware of any articulation agreements listing Durham College as a receiving institution. 4.5. The Pathways and Credit Transfer Coordinator will be responsible for acquiring all signatures on the CARAF. 4.6. To initiate partnerships with international institutions, a general agreement of cooperation should be signed prior to commencement of program-specific contracts. Both the general agreement of cooperation and any international articulation agreements should be evaluated by the Executive Director, International Education, in collaboration with the appropriate academic dean(s). 4.7. All articulation agreements will have clearly-identified start, review, and end dates. 4.8. The Pathways and Credit Transfer Coordinator will be responsible for reviewing the status of articulation agreements on an annual basis to identify any articulation agreements that are nearing expiration. Notification will be sent during this annual review to the appropriate academic Dean(s), who may initiate contact with the receiving institution if they are interested in renewing or modifying the original articulation agreement. 4.9. Articulation partners should be notified, in writing, by the appropriate Dean of any changes to program curriculum or status at the time of change, or sooner if possible. 4.10. The creation, review and renewal of articulation agreements will be the responsibility of the academic Dean(s) involved with the articulation agreement. 4.11. All articulation agreements must include a clause stating that students enrolled in the receiving institution’s program at the time of any change or cancellation should be given sufficient time to complete their credential. 4.12. Promotion of articulation agreements is a shared responsibility across campus but is led by the Pathways and Credit Transfer Coordinator. 4.13. While the College will promote all opportunities for further study, preference (as it pertains to promotional materials and events) will be given to institutions which there is a formal articulation agreement. 4.14. The Pathways and Credit Transfer Coordinator, under the guidance of the Director, Student Recruitment and Admission Services, will be responsible for maintaining accurate transfer information on the Durham College website, Durham College Transfer Guide, and in the College’s academic calendar. 5. Procedure 5.1. Discussions regarding interest in developing a partnership/articulation agreement are initiated by the academic dean or designate. 5.2. If there are opportunities to expand the articulation agreement beyond the initiating academic school, the initiating academic Dean or designate will invite other academic Deans to participate in discussions. 5.3. When interest has been established in developing an articulation agreement, the academic Dean(s) or designate(s) will notify the Vice-President, Academic for approval. 5.4. Program information is exchanged between Articulation Partners. The academic Dean(s) or designate(s) will be responsible for providing required information for their programs. 5.5. A draft articulation agreement will be created by, or in concert with, the Receiving Institution. The draft articulation agreement is shared with the VicePresident, Academic, Pathways and Credit Transfer Coordinator, and others as required. 5.6. Any changes to the draft articulation agreement will be discussed by the academic Dean(s) or designate(s) and the Receiving Institution. 5.7. Concurrent to discussions between the academic dean(s) or designate(s) and the Receiving Institution, the Pathways and Credit Transfer Coordinator will share draft articulation agreement with the Office of Insurance and Risk Management and commence the CARAF process. 5.8. The Office of Insurance and Risk Management may propose amendments to the draft articulation agreement, or will approve the document in its entirety. If amendments are required, the changes will be shared with the Receiving Institution for approval by the academic Dean(s) or designate(s). 5.9. Once reviewed by the Office of Insurance and Risk Management, the academic Dean(s) or designate(s), and Vice-President, Academic, a formal articulation agreement will be created for signing. 5.10. When the final articulation agreement is received, the Pathways and Credit Transfer Coordinator will acquire the signatures of the Vice-President, Academic and the president for the CARAF. The President’s signature is also required on articulation agreement to execute the contract. 5.11. Upon receipt of signed articulation, the Pathways and Credit Transfer Coordinator will update the online Transfer Guide with the new articulation agreement, and will promote the opportunity to students and alumni. 5.12. Articulation agreements will be reviewed on an annual basis. The Pathways and Credit Transfer Coordinator will advise the appropriate academic Dean(s) of all agreements requiring review. Where necessary, the academic Dean(s) will work with the partner institution to negotiate a renewal or terminate the agreement. 6. Roles and responsibilities 6.1. It is the responsibility of the Vice-President, Academic, in collaboration with the academic schools to ensure this policy and procedure is fully implemented. 6.2. It is the responsibility of the academic Dean(s) or designate(s) to initiate articulation agreement opportunities for their students and provide appropriate information to the receiving institution to determine ability of program(s) to transfer. 6.3. It is the responsibility of the academic Dean(s) or designate(s) to discuss proposed articulation agreements with the Vice-President, Academic, and receive approval before proceeding. 6.4. It is the responsibility of the Office of Insurance and Risk Management to review the articulation agreement with the CARAF and provide recommendations before an articulation agreement is finalized. 6.5. It is the responsibility of the Office of Insurance and Risk Management to keep original signed copies of all articulation agreements. Additional copies are held by the Pathways and Credit Transfer Coordinator and the academic Dean(s). 6.6. It is the responsibility of the President to act as executor by signing formal articulation agreements and corresponding CARAFs. 6.7. It is the responsibility of the Pathways and Credit Transfer Coordinator to promote articulation agreements to Durham College students/alumni. 6.8. It is the responsibility of the receiving institution to advise students about admission and transfer eligibility for transferring to their institution. 6.9. It is the responsibility of the student to contact the admissions/transfer contact at the institution they wish to attend. 7. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act considerations Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards have been considered in the development of this policy and procedure and it adheres to the principles outlined in the College’s commitment to accessibility as demonstrated by the Accessibility Plan (ADMIN-203). 8. Non-compliance implications 8.1. Non-compliance with this policy, and/or any timelines associated with compliance, may result in terminated articulation agreements. 8.2. Failure to adhere to the guidelines for implementation and review of articulation agreements may result in inaccurate information being shared with graduates and prospective students, which in term could have a negative impact on the College. 9. Communications plan
  • A message will be posted on ICE alerting employees when new or revised policies and procedures are added to ICE.
  • A message will be posted on MyCampus alerting students when new or revised policies and procedures are added.
10. Related forms, legislation or external resources None.
View policy [PDF]

Course Outlines

ACAD-108

Introduction

Course outlines are vital communication tools for disseminating academic information to students, employees and external bodies. Consistency in their development, revision, management, retention and distribution promotes program and student success. By clearly documenting each course’s learning outcomes, essential employability skills, assessment criteria, sequence of instruction, learning resources, instructional methods and expectations for the classroom environment, Durham College is promoting transparent and predictable delivery of curriculum to its students.

1. Introduction Course outlines are vital communication tools for disseminating academic information to students, employees and external bodies. Consistency in their development, revision, management, retention and distribution promotes program and student success. By clearly documenting each course’s learning outcomes, essential employability skills, assessment criteria, sequence of instruction, learning resources, instructional methods and expectations for the classroom environment, Durham College is promoting transparent and predictable delivery of curriculum to its students. 2. Purpose This policy and procedure provides the framework for the development, revision, distribution, management of course level curriculum. 3. Definitions Refer to Durham College’s Standard Definitions. 4. Policy statements 4.1. Every course at Durham College has a detailed course outline that is prepared using the College-approved template. 4.2. Course outlines will be developed in accordance with the Minister’s Binding Policy Directive: Framework for Programs of Instruction, Credentials Framework, Postsecondary Education Quality Assessment Board, Handbook for Ontario Colleges – degree level standards, program standards or descriptions, applicable external accreditation standards and requirements, appropriate legislations (e.g. AODA requirements), and the approved curriculum map. 4.3. Course outlines document the evaluations and breadth of learning outcomes of a program as defined in the program learning outcomes and articulated in the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities (MTCU) Framework for Programs of Instruction and the Postsecondary Education Quality Assessment Board, Handbook for Ontario Colleges – degree level standards. 4.4. Developing, reviewing and revising course outlines is a collaborative process between faculty, program teams, Subject Matter Experts (SME), and/or academic administrative staff. 4.5. Course outlines will follow the college-approved template and be available to students prior to the start of class through the Learning Management System (LMS) and MyCampus. 4.6. Course outlines and changes to course outlines are binding on both students and faculty. 4.7. Course outlines will be followed by all faculty members teaching the affected course (including Professional and Part-time Learning faculty), and are approved by the Executive Dean/Dean or Associate Dean. 4.8. Course outlines for new programs are developed by a team (can include a Subject Matter Experts (SME), a Project Lead, a curriculum specialist) and approved by the Executive Dean/Dean or Associate Dean. 4.9. Faculty will review the course outline with their students in their first class. 4.10. Before the completion of a course, students should retain a copy of the course outline in which they enrol for future academic consideration. 4.11. Under extraordinary circumstances, course outlines are subject to change within a semester. 4.12. Course outlines are to be stored as part of the academic school’s central electronic records on the Shared Network Drive. Course Outlines have a permanent retention in accordance with the Durham College Common Records Schedule and the Information Management policy and procedure ADMIN-242. 5. Procedure 5.1. Annual Review 5.1.1. Course outlines are reviewed at least once per academic year. 5.1.2. Revisions to course outlines may be informed by student feedback, program team feedback, changes in industry practice, quality criteria, alterations to program standards or degree requirements, and/or Program Advisory Committee input. 5.1.3. Updated course outlines will be submitted to the Executive Dean/Dean or Associate Dean for approval prior to being made available to students. 5.1.4. Each academic school will post a copy of approved course outlines to MyCampus in advance of course commencement. 5.2. Course Outline Revision outside of the Annual Review Process 5.2.1. In exceptional circumstances, a course outline’s learning outcomes and/or evaluation criteria may require revision outside of the annual review process. 5.2.2. Written documentation detailing the proposed changes will be documented on the College-approved addendum template and provided to the Executive Dean/Dean or Associate Dean for approval. 5.2.3. If a change to a course outline is approved, faculty will notify all students enrolled in the course. Notification will be provided verbally, at the next scheduled class, and in writing, on the College’s Learning Management System. 5.2.4. Any approved change(s) to course learning outcomes or evaluation criteria will be implemented by all faculty teaching the affected course. 5.2.5. The Academic school office will update their academic school’s central electronic records on the Shared Network Drive with the approved addendum to the published course outline and post a copy of the approved addendum to the published course outline on MyCampus. 6. Roles and responsibilities 6.1. It is the responsibility of the Vice-President, Academic to ensure this policy and procedure is fully implemented. 6.2. It is the responsibility of the Executive Dean/Dean or Associate Dean to approve the final copy and any proposed changes of the course outline, and to review course outlines on an annual basis. 6.3. It is the responsibility of the Executive Dean/Dean or Associate Dean to ensure that all course outlines are stored as part of the academic school’s central electronic records on the appropriate Shared Network Drive. 6.4. It is the responsibility of the faculty to comply with the expectations of course outline development, review, revision and/or proposed changes in delivery, and in the communication of the course outline with students. 6.5. It is the responsibility of the student to be familiar with the contents of the course outline for every course in which they enroll, to ask for clarification, and retain a copy of the course outline. 6.6. It is the responsibility of the staff of the CAFE to support and provide guidance for faculty in the development or revision of course outlines, as needed. 7. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act considerations Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards have been considered in the development of this policy and procedure and it adheres to the principles outlined in the College’s commitment to accessibility as demonstrated by the Accessibility Plan (ADMIN-203). 8. Non-compliance implications Non-compliance may negatively affect the learning environment and result in performance issues for students and/or faculty. 9. Communications plan
  • A message will be posted on ICE alerting employees when new or revised policies and procedures are added to ICE.
  • A message will be posted on MyCampus alerting students when new or revised policies and procedures are added.
10. Related forms, legislation or external resources
  • Minister’s Binding Policy Directive: Framework for Programs of Instruction
  • Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities Program Standards
  • Durham College Faculty Skills and Abilities Competencies Matrix
  • Postsecondary Education Quality Assessment Board, Handbook for Ontario Colleges.
VIEW POLICY [PDF]

Credit Transfer and Letter of Permission

ADMIN-252

Introduction

Durham College acknowledges the significance of the time savings that students can achieve through the recognition of academic credits earned at recognized post-secondary educational institutions. The College is committed to maximizing credit transfer opportunities wherever possible for our students. Strategic Enrolment Services (SES), working collaboratively with the academic schools, will facilitate the processing of credit transfer and Letter of Permission (LOP) requests in a timely and efficient manner.

1. Introduction Durham College acknowledges the significance of the time savings that students can achieve through the recognition of academic credits earned at recognized post- secondary educational institutions. The College is committed to maximizing credit transfer opportunities wherever possible for our students. Strategic Enrolment Services (SES), working collaboratively with the academic schools, will facilitate the processing of credit transfer and Letter of Permission (LOP) requests in a timely and efficient manner. 2. Purpose This policy and procedure provides the criteria and processes for demonstrating, evaluating and acknowledging academic credits earned at external post-secondary institutions to determine equivalencies to Durham College courses, for establishing internal Durham College course equivalencies, and for requesting permission to take a course(s) at another post-secondary institution to be used for credit towards a Durham College program. 3. Definitions Refer to Durham College’s Standard Definitions. 4. Policy statements 4.1. Credit transfer and LOP applications shall be considered in a fair and expeditious manner. 4.2. Whenever possible, maximum recognition of prior education will be awarded. In the event a full-time student receives enough credits to be granted admission to an advanced term, placement will be based on seat availability. 4.3. No more than 75 per cent of a program of study can be obtained through credit transfer for all credentials.
4.4. Recognition of prior education shall be acknowledged through the granting of external transfer credits, recorded to the student’s academic record with a grade of “TC” (transfer credit).  These grades are not factored into grade point average calculations. 4.5. External courses that have been approved for credit will be maintained as equivalencies in the College’s student information system for a period of three years, unless written notification has been provided to SES. If the request is received mid-term, the change will be implemented in the subsequent semester. 4.6. An application fee will be charged for each individual LOP and external credit transfer request. 4.7. Courses should have been completed within the last five years. While courses completed more than five years ago can be submitted, credit transfer applications may be denied if there have been significant changes to practice or professional requirements. General education courses are exempted from the five-year rule. 4.8. Credit transfer and LOP applications will not be awarded for courses taken at career/private institutions. 4.9. Credit transfer may be given to students for recognized non-post-secondary courses when a pre-negotiated agreement has been established by Durham College. Where such an agreement is not in place, students must pursue credit consideration through Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR). All pre-negotiated agreements will be posted on the Durham College credit transfer webpage: www.durhamcollege.ca/credittransfer. 4.10. External courses with a pass/fail grade will not be considered for credit transfer without sufficient proof that the grade required for a pass was a minimum 60 per cent or passing grade for the requested course, whichever is higher, as outlined by program requirements. 4.11. Some programs have program/course-specific requirements for credit transfer and LOP eligibility. Information regarding these program-specific requirements can be found on the Durham College credit transfer webpage: www.durhamcollege.ca/credittransfer. 4.12. International applications for credit transfer must be accompanied by a course- by-course evaluation from either World Education Services (WES) or International Credential Assessment Service of Canada (ICAS). 4.13. Timelines for the submission and assessment of credit transfer and LOP applications will be published and adhered to. Should students apply late for credit transfer consideration, all applicable withdrawal deadlines will apply. 4.14. It is recommended that applications for credit transfer be completed prior to course commencement.
4.15. Applications for an LOP must be submitted before the student registers for a course at a host institution. 4.16. In the event that a student is enrolled in the course they are seeking credit for before applying for credit transfer or LOP consideration, all applicable withdrawal deadlines will apply. 4.17. Fast-track students are not eligible for LOP or credit transfer. 4.18. Decisions regarding credit transfer and LOP applications may be appealed. The appeal process will follow the Grade Appeal Policy and Procedure ACAD- 111. 5. Procedure 5.1. Credit Transfer 5.1.1. Application for Credit Transfer The application for credit transfer can be completed through the Credit Transfer Application portal on MyCampus. Students are responsible for providing all required documentation - including official transcripts and course outlines - to support their request. An application fee will be charged and any request for credit transfer consideration will not be processed until this fee has been paid. 5.1.2. Applications for credit transfer will be accepted each semester up until the 10th day of classes. 5.2. Internal Credit 5.2.1. Exact courses will automatically transfer from one program to another on a student’s academic record, as will documented equivalencies. 5.2.2. Where previous Durham College courses are not automatically recognized, students may submit a request to have these courses considered toward a new certificate or diploma. 5.2.3. Internal credit requests require a completed application form and detailed course outlines for assessment. Additional documentation may be requested by the subject matter expert evaluating the request. There is no fee for this service. 5.2.4. Approved equivalencies are recorded in the college’s student information system and included in the student’s grade point average. This equivalency will apply for all students. When an equivalency cannot be built within the college’s student information system, a substitution or exemption will be utilized.
5.3. Evaluating Credit Transfer Requests 5.3.1. Applications for credit transfer are submitted to the Credit Transfer Office in SES for tracking and processing. 5.3.2. If a previously recognized course equivalency exists within Durham College’s student information system, the credit transfer request will be approved and transcribed on the student’s academic record. 5.3.3. If the course being requested for consideration is not currently approved in the student information system, credit transfer staff will send the course information to the subject-matter expert in the appropriate academic school office for review and decision. All requests will include a copy of the Credit Transfer and Letter of Permission Evaluation Guide to ensure a consistent, quality, learning outcome-focused assessment of credit transfer requests. Subject matter experts have 10 business days to return a response to the Credit Transfer Office. Requests that have not received a response within 10 business days will be escalated by the Credit Transfer Office to ensure a timely response for students. 5.4. Recording Credits on Academic Record 5.4.1. Credit for external courses approved as equivalent to a Durham College course will be transcribed on the student’s academic record with a grade of “TC” (credit transfer) and will not be included in the calculation of a student’s grade point average. 5.4.2. Approved external credits will be maintained on the College’s student information system for a period of four years, unless written notification has been provided to SES by the academic school office. If the request is received mid-term, the change will be implemented in the subsequent term. 5.5. Notification of Assessment Results 5.5.1. If a student is currently registered in the course they are seeking credit for, they must remain in class until a response has been received regarding their application for credit transfer. If a student has questions regarding the status of their application for credit transfer, they should contact transfers@durhamcollege.ca. Decisions regarding credit transfer applications will be communicated on the MyCampus Credit Transfer Application portal. Evaluations typically take 10-15 business days to complete.
5.6. Appeals 5.6.1. Students may appeal a credit transfer decision. The appeal process will follow the Grade Appeal Policy and Procedure ACAD-111. 5.7. General Education Electives 5.7.1. General education credits will be reviewed and approved by credit transfer staff. Generic general education credits will be created and used each semester for any courses approved for use as a general education credit without an exact equivalent (i.e. GNED 1100 – General Education Elective I, GNED 1200 – General Education Elective II, and GNED 1300 – General Education Elective III). 5.8. Breadth Electives 5.8.1. Generic breadth elective credits will be created and used each semester for any courses approved for use as a breadth elective without an exact equivalent. 5.9. Application for a Letter of Permission (LOP) 5.9.1. A student may initiate the LOP process by submitting an application form to the Credit Transfer Office in SES indicating that they wish to receive pre-approval to take a course at another recognized post-secondary institution and transfer it back to satisfy a course requirement in their Durham College program. It is the student’s responsibility to find a course that they feel is equivalent prior to submitting their request. 5.9.2. The LOP application form must be submitted prior to registering in the course at the other institution. The application form can be downloaded from the Durham College website (www.durhamcollege.ca/lopapp) or picked up in person from the SES office. It should be submitted at least four weeks prior to the intended start date at the other institution. In order to ensure timely processing of the application, it is the student’s responsibility to provide a course outline from the other institution at the time the application is submitted. Incomplete applications will not be accepted.  An application fee will be charged and must be paid at the time the form is submitted.
5.9.3. Upon receipt of the LOP application form, credit transfer staff will confirm that the student has met eligibility for the LOP process, which requires that the student must:
  • Be an active student in good academic standing
  • Not be in the first term of their program (as they will not have academic standing)
  • Not have any academic integrity alerts on their record
  • Not exceed residency requirements for program if approved (if in receipt of previous credits or PLAR)
If the student is eligible, the request will be reviewed for completeness and verified against the equivalency database in student information system. If a previously-recognized course equivalency exists within Durham College’s student information system, the LOP request will be approved immediately. If a course equivalency does not exist in the student information system, credit transfer staff will send the course information to the subject-matter expert in the appropriate academic school office for review and decision. All requests will include a copy of the Credit Transfer and Letter of Permission Evaluation Guide to ensure a consistent, quality, learning outcome-focused assessment of letter of permission requests. Subject- matter experts have 10 business days to return response to Credit Transfer Office. Requests that have not received a response within 10 business days will be escalated by the Credit Transfer Office to ensure a timely response for students. LOP requests for General Education electives are reviewed by credit transfer staff. Generic general education credits will be created and used each semester for any courses approved as a general education credit where an equivalent elective is not offered at Durham College (i.e. GNED 1100 – General Education Elective I, GNED 1200 – General Education Elective II, and GNED 1300 – General Education Elective III). 5.9.4. Credit transfer staff will notify the student via e-mail of the decision regarding their LOP request. If approved, the student will also receive an official letter indicating approval to take the course and the requirements for receiving the credit (timelines for completion of course, minimum grade required, supporting documentation to be submitted once completed, etc.). The letter will be attached to the approval e-mail but if requested, may also be mailed to institution where student plans to take course. A digital copy of the letter will be saved to student record for future reference. 5.9.5. Newly approved equivalencies will be recorded in College’s student information system.
5.9.6. Upon successful completion of the course with required minimum grade (60%/C or passing grade for the requested course, whichever is higher, as outlined by program requirements), the student must provide an official external transcript to credit transfer staff. Once the required documentation is received, the course will be transcribed on the student’s academic record with a grade of “TC” and will not be included in the calculation of a student’s grade point average. Note that students completing their final course through the LOP process must have their official transcript submitted to SES a minimum of 45 days prior to their applicable spring or fall convocation date. 5.10. Credit Transfer Equivalency Database 5.10.1. All approved external equivalencies will be added to the college’s credit transfer database for future approvals. Equivalencies will be built for a period of three years. After three years, equivalencies will be reviewed for extension or termination. Terminated equivalencies will be sent for re- assessment if a new application is submitted to identify if the equivalency can be added back to the database and if not, the rationale for denial. 5.10.2. If there are significant changes to a Durham College course, an equivalency may be terminated prior to the three-year expiry with written notification to credit transfer staff. If the request is received mid-term, the change will be implemented in the subsequent term. 5.11. Appeals 5.11.1. Students may appeal the LOP decision. The appeal process will follow the Grade Appeal Policy and Procedure ACAD-111. 5.11.2. Prior to initiating an appeal, the student should review the rationale for denial provided in their letter of permission communication. If they can demonstrate that the course they plan to take addresses the missing learning outcomes, they should try to resubmit their application with the additional information. 6. Roles and responsibilities 6.1. It is the responsibility of the Executive Director/Registrar, SES, in collaboration with the Vice-President, Academic to ensure this policy and procedure is fully implemented. 6.2. It is the responsibility of SES, in collaboration with the academic schools, to facilitate the processing of credit transfer and LOP requests in a timely and efficient manner. 6.3. It is the responsibility of the student to apply for credit transfer and LOP consideration within the published timelines as posted on, but not limited to MyCampus and the College website. It is also the responsibility of the student to submit supporting documentation to prove successful completion of approved courses by required deadlines and to be aware of graduation timelines if they are looking for a credit in their final term of study.
6.4. It is the responsibility of each academic school to review and respond to credit transfer and LOP requests forwarded by SES within documented timeframes. 6.5. It is the responsibility of SES to provide each academic school with a list of previously approved external credits that require review and re-approval. This process will be completed annually, for all course equivalencies with an expiry date of three years after the last approval (as identified in the Student Information System). 6.6. It is the responsibility of SES to facilitate the credit transfer and LOP processes, record credits on the student’s academic record, as appropriate, maintain a database of approved credits, and advise students of the results of their application. 6.7. It is the responsibility of SES to verify course equivalency requests against credit transfer database, send new course equivalency requests for review, record credits on the student’s academic record, and advise students of the results of their request. 7. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act considerations 7.1. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards have been considered in the development of this policy and procedure and it adheres to the principles outlined in the College’s commitment to accessibility as demonstrated by the Accessibility Plan Policy and Procedure (ADMIN-203). 7.2. Forms for applying for credit transfer and LOP are available in alternate formats upon request.
8. Non-compliance implications
  • Failure to comply with this policy puts the college in conflict with the Minister’s directive and at risk of actions by the government.
9. Communications plan
  • A message will be posted on ICE alerting employees when new or revised policies and procedures are added to
  • A message will be posted on MyCampus alerting students when new or revised policies and procedures are
10. Related forms, legislation or external resources
  • Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities - Minister’s Binding Policy Directive Frameworks for Programs of Instruction
  • Durham College credit transfer website: ca/credittransfer
  • Durham College letter of permission website: ca/LOP
View policy [PDF]Supporting Document 1

Curriculum Development

ACAD-102

Introduction

Curriculum provides a framework for Durham College’s core business - teaching and learning. Section 5 articulates a coherent curriculum development procedure for use by the program team in developing or revising curriculum. Such a procedure assists in the integration of the various curriculum activities by identifying the elements of curriculum development and defining processes, roles and responsibilities for the development and renewal of post-secondary curriculum at Durham College. The curriculum development process recognizes that new curriculum development and curriculum modification is initiated by several key stakeholders. These include the program team, program faculty, academic leadership, community and industry partners through program advisory committees and government bodies.

1. Introduction Curriculum provides a framework for Durham College’s core business - teaching and learning. Section 5 articulates a coherent curriculum development procedure for use by the program team in developing or revising curriculum. Such a procedure assists in the integration of the various curriculum activities by identifying the elements of curriculum development and defining processes, roles and responsibilities for the development and renewal of post-secondary curriculum at Durham College. The curriculum development process recognizes that new curriculum development and curriculum modification is initiated by several key stakeholders. These include the program team, program faculty, academic leadership, community and industry partners through program advisory committees and government bodies 2. Purpose This policy and procedure provides a context for post-secondary curriculum development and renewal throughout a program’s life cycle. It provides a basis for curriculum decisions, including the development of curriculum procedures and processes. 3. Definitions Refer to Durham College’s Standard Definitions. 4. Policy statements 4.1. Curriculum is the shared responsibility of program team members who collaboratively develop, review and revise program curriculum, and deliver curriculum. 4.2. Curriculum will comply with the Credentials Framework (Minister’s Binding Policy Directive on Framework for Programs of Instruction), MTCU Program Standards or Program Descriptions, and Postsecondary Education Quality Assessment Board, Handbook for Ontario Colleges – degree level standards. 4.3. Development and renewal of curriculum will be influenced by government guidelines, emerging workplace needs, stakeholder input, college policies, technology and resources 4.4. Curriculum is outcomes-based and learner-centered. Content, learning resources, learning activities, assessment, and evaluation, all derive from, and align with, program and course learning outcomes. 4.5. The development and renewal of curriculum will be consistent with the following principles: 4.5.1. Curriculum is purposeful and intentional; 4.5.2. Curriculum is current and relevant with provincial program standards or program descriptions and labour market needs; 4.5.3. Curriculum is based on sound learning and curriculum design principles; 4.5.4. Curriculum provides active learning opportunities to maximize student engagement; 4.5.5. Curriculum provides viable pathways into, through, and beyond programs 4.5.6. Curriculum recognizes diversity within our communities and contributes to the development of a respectful learning environment; 4.5.7. Curriculum aligns content, learning resources, and authentic assessment with learning outcomes, regardless of delivery modes. 4.5.8. Curriculum must comply to relevant standards such as the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA). 4.5.9. Curriculum is consistent with the mission and vision of the college. 4.5.10. Curriculum is appropriate to the level at which the qualification is offered. 4.5.11. Curriculum is appropriate to the occupational requirements of the program graduates. 4.6. The primary vehicle for communicating curriculum to students, faculty and administrators is course outlines. 5. Procedure 5.1. Curriculum development of new programs will be developed in consultation with a curriculum specialist, Centre for Academic and Faculty Enrichment (CAFE). 5.2. Clear, measurable, performance-based learning outcomes, which are aligned to learning and learning activities and assessments will be developed. 5.3. Learning/course outcomes and assessment measures of student learning will be developed consistent with the credential granted, provincial program standards (where they exist), the program map and the minimum expectations of the workplace. 5.4. Prior learning assessments (PLAR) will be designed to evaluate the course learning outcomes, including the essential employability outcomes for a given course. 5.5. Program curriculum of existing programs will be reviewed annually to ensure it remains current, relevant, and to ensure it is meeting the occupational requirements of program graduates. 5.6. Changes to the program curriculum will be made when necessary, including changes to course outcomes, learning activities, and assessments of student learning. Changes must be approved by the School’s Leadership and follow the prescribed timelines. See Program Change Policy and Procedure ACAD-124 for further information. 6. Roles and responsibilities 6.1. Program team 6.1.1. The role of the program team is to meet on a regular basis to ensure continuous development and improvement of the program. The team will consult with the CAFE, as required, for advice regarding such matters as: instructional design, assessment/evaluation and the incorporation of learning technologies. 6.1.2. The program team will review appropriate program information, such as program description, MTCU program standards, PEQAB standards and external accreditation standards when applicable, course outlines/course learning outcomes, assessment/evaluation rubrics and practices. 6.1.3. The program team is responsible for the co-ordination and alignment of the program curriculum by:
  • Ensuring the program learning outcomes are consistent with the Minister’s Binding Policy Directive for Programs of Instruction, the Credentials Framework, aligned with provincial program standards, PEQAB standards, program descriptions and/or external licensing, regulatory and accreditation standards;
  • Ensuring learning outcomes are appropriate to the level for the credential;
  • Ensuring the program learning outcomes are reflected in the course learning outcomes and appropriate to the requirements of the program graduates;
  • Ensuring clear statements of learning outcomes exist for the courses and are communicated effectively to students;
  • Analyzing curriculum for gaps and redundancies in outcomes, teaching and learning, and assessments;
  • Providing guidelines regarding the level of learning required in a course as it relates to class time, semester of study, and course outcomes;
  • Tracking and documenting the development and implementation of curriculum changes;
  • Participating in program mapping and analysis, Annual Curriculum Renewal (ACR), Program Review and Renewal and the development of annual Program Quality Progress Reports (PQPR);
  • Creating and assuring academic pathways;
  • Updating program of studies as needed;
  • Integrating contemporary instructional technology to meet the learning needs of a variety of learners and to ensure accessibility in compliance with AODA standards; and
  • Analyze the program map and program curriculum to identify gaps and redundancies.
6.1.4. For the development of a new program of study, program or curriculum development teams are to ensure that the course outcomes are developed for all courses in advance of program delivery to ensure the entire curriculum addresses all the Program Learning Outcomes, and Essential Employability Skill Outcomes. 6.2. Individual faculty 6.2.1. To design curriculum that reflects current and leading edge sector requirements. 6.2.2. To design curriculum that is appropriate to the occupational requirements and assists students in understanding the scope of their chosen occupational/professional career. 6.2.3. To ensure that learning outcomes are operationally meaningful in that they provide a sound basis for curriculum development and student learning assessment and support and reflect the related program learning outcomes. 6.2.4. To ensure that student requirements and obligations are stated and are derived from, and flow coherently from, the program’s stated learning outcomes. 6.2.5. To implement assessment strategies to determine the learner’s level of achievement of the stated course and program learning outcomes. 6.2.6. To design curriculum to provide students with vocationally meaningful and relevant ways of demonstrating essential employability skills and that are appropriate for the credential. 6.2.7. To design and document all teaching/learning activities and resources. 6.2.8. To determines eligibility for PLAR and develop assessment tools. 6.2.9. To execute curriculum changes based on program map and analysis. 6.2.10. To tracks implementation of curriculum changes. 6.2.11. To updates curriculum with respect to technology advances. 6.2.12. To design curriculum that supports accessibility for all students through the use of universal design for learning principles. 6.3. Academic Dean/Associate Dean The role of the Academic Dean/Associate Dean is to ensure program alignment with the college’s strategic direction, assign the responsibility for preparation and revision of course outlines/curriculum, support the program team by consulting and/or collaborating with the program team about their team activities, and to participate in decision-making. This also includes ensuring program learning outcomes/curriculum are reviewed annually to ensure learning outcomes remain relevant and changes are made when necessary. 6.4. Curriculum specialist The role of a Curriculum Specialist is to provide curriculum-related expertise to program teams as requested or required, such as course outline support, program mapping and analysis support, course and program learning outcome development and the development of authentic assessments aligned to course learning outcomes. The curriculum specialist may also include other faculty developers where appropriate. 7. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act considerations Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards have been considered in the development of this policy and procedure and it adheres to the principles outlined in the College’s commitment to accessibility as demonstrated by the Accessibility Plan (ADMIN-203). 8. Non-compliance implications Non-compliance may result in curriculum that does not meet the Minister’s Binding Policy Directive: Framework for Programs of Instruction or PEQAB standards, and/or internal and external quality assurance processes and requirements, and may also negatively affect the learning and performance of students and/or faculty. 9. Communications plan
  • A message will be posted on ICE alerting employees when new or revised policies and procedures are added to ICE.
  • A message will be posted on MyCampus alerting students when new or revised policies and procedures are added.
10. Related forms, legislation or external resources
  • Minister’s Binding Policy Directive: Framework for Programs of Instruction
  • MTCU Development Program Standards
  • Durham College Faculty Skills and Abilities Competency Matrix
  • Postsecondary Education Quality Assessment Board, Handbook for Ontario Colleges
View policy [PDF]

Domestic Admissions

ADMIN-208

Introduction

Durham College offers a diverse mix of high-quality, relevant programs for career-focused students. Admission standards are a clear signal to prospective students about the preparation needed to succeed in college, and the admission process must be carried out in an objective and transparent manner. Procedures and processes under this policy must adhere to, and comply with, the overall framework established by the Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development (MAESD) Binding Policy Directive – Admissions Criteria, and the Post-secondary Education Quality Assessment Board (PEQAB), Handbook for Ontario Colleges – degree level standards.

1. Introduction Durham College offers a diverse mix of high-quality, relevant programs for career-focused students. Admission standards are a clear signal to prospective students about the preparation needed to succeed in college, and the admission process must be carried out in an objective and transparent manner. Procedures and processes under this policy must adhere to, and comply with, the overall framework established by the Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development (MAESD) Binding Policy Directive – Admissions Criteria, and the Post-secondary Education Quality Assessment Board (PEQAB), Handbook for Ontario Colleges – degree level standards. 2. Purpose This policy and procedure provides a framework by which all prospective domestic students shall be considered for full- or part-time admission into a post-secondary program at Durham College. 3. Definitions Refer to Durham College’s Standard Definitions. 4. Policy statements 4.1. Student Recruitment and Admission Services shall adhere to the MAESD Binding Policy Directive – Admissions Criteria or the Post-secondary Education Quality Assessment Board (PEQAB), Handbook for Ontario Colleges – degree level standards, as appropriate for the processing of domestic applications. 4.2. All domestic applicants have the right to fair and equitable assessment for admission. 4.3. Admission requirements shall be established on a program-specific basis, by the academic school at the time of program approval. A program may require applicants to meet additional or alternative admission criteria. Admission requirements can only be revised 18 months prior to the start of an academic year. 4.4. It is the responsibility of the domestic applicant to be aware of the program admission requirements. 4.5. A domestic applicant may be issued a conditional offer of admission to a program, provided that the applicant has indicated her or his intent to complete an outstanding admission requirement within a stipulated timeframe, prior to the start of the academic term to which they have applied. Failure to do so will result in the revoking of the conditional offer and/or the removal of the student from their program. 4.6. Meeting minimum admission requirements does not guarantee admission into a course or program. 4.7. For highly competitive programs, priority of admission shall be determined by applicant qualification and residency. 4.8. Domestic applicants not admitted to the program of their choice may be given an alternative offer of admission. 4.9. Students seeking readmission to Durham College shall be subject to current program admission requirements and may be subject to additional conditions. 4.10. Durham College retains the right to refuse readmission to students who have been suspended or dismissed from the institution, for either academic or behavioural reasons. 4.11. It is the responsibility of the applicant to ensure that application information and all supporting documentation is truthful, complete and correct. Durham College reserves the right to verify the authenticity of any documentation provided as part of an application. If it is proven, or if Durham College has reasonable grounds to conclude that false information has been provided, the application will be denied. 4.12. Domestic applicants not admitted shall be granted the opportunity for an admissions review. 4.13. The review of an admissions decision shall be communicated in writing and within prescribed deadlines as defined by the office of Strategic Enrolment Services. 5. Procedure 5.1. Selection process In adherence with the MAESD Binding Policy Directive – Admissions Criteria or the Post-secondary Education Quality Assessment Board (PEQAB), Handbook for Ontario Colleges – degree level standards, the Student Recruitment and Admission Services office will consider all domestic applicants to Durham College in an equitable, consistent and transparent manner. The selection process for all domestic applicants involves the:
  • Determination of college eligibility;
  • Determination of program eligibility; and
  • Selection of program-eligible applicants from among those who applied to highly competitive or oversubscribed programs.
5.1.1. College eligibility – certificate, diploma, or advanced diploma programs To be considered for admission to the college in a certificate, diploma, or advanced diploma program, a domestic applicant must be one of the following:
  • Holder of an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent;
  • Nineteen years of age or older (mature student status), on or before the start of the program, and not the holder of an OSSD. For purposes of program eligibility, a mature applicant is still required to complete the prerequisite subject credit(s);
  • Holder of a General Educational Development Certificate (GED).
5.1.2. College eligibility – degree programs To be considered for admission to the college in a degree program a domestic applicant must be one of the following:
  • Holder of an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) with six university or university/college courses at the Grade 12 level;
  • Nineteen years of age or older (mature student status), on or before the start of the program, and not the holder of an OSSD. For purposes of program eligibility, a mature applicant is still required to complete the prerequisite subject credit(s) and may be required to complete an entrance examination.
5.1.3. Program eligibility a) It is recognized that in order to benefit from the program of instruction, certain knowledge, aptitudes and skills are required. Program eligibility criteria are established on a program-specific basis by the academic departments, in consultation with deputy registrar and are approved by the vice-president, Academic. b) Program eligibility criteria must be relevant to the program and capable of objective demonstration or measurement. c) Program eligibility criteria for certificates, diplomas or advanced diplomas cannot exclusively require secondary school university (‘U’- level) designation. d) If questionnaires are used for applicant selection, they must include the following notification to comply with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act: In accordance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act, your personal information is collected, retained and reported to the Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development under the legal authority of the Ontario Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology Act, 2002. MAESD collects student-level enrolment-related data, which includes limited personal information such as Ontario Education Numbers, student characteristics and educational outcomes, in order to administer government post-secondary funding, policies and programs, including planning, evaluation and monitoring activities. Your personal information may also be used or disclosed for administrative, information technology, law enforcement, statistical or research purposes of the College or ministries and agencies of the Ontario and federal governments. Further details are available at our Privacy page (http://www.durhamcollege.ca/about-us/legal-privacy) or by contacting the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Coordinator, President’s Office, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, ON L1G 0C5, 905.721.2000 ext. 3292 e) Random selection will not be used as an applicant selection technique. f) Where selection criteria include aptitude tests, interviews, campus orientation or other selection tools requiring mandatory college visits, alternative arrangements will be made available for domestic applicants who reside outside of normal commuting distance from the college. g) Durham College will endeavour to minimize an applicant’s travel and testing costs, as well as the time required for and duplication related to college pre-admission testing and interviews. h) In adherence with MAESD’s Binding Policy Directive – Admissions Criteria, the practice of weighting between university (‘U’ level), university/college (‘M’ level), and college (‘C’ level) courses will not be allowed when making admissions decisions for certificate, diploma, advanced diploma programs. Durham College will apply equal weighting to the secondary school course designations for these programs. 5.1.4. Applicant selection – residency Eligible applicants will be accepted into highly competitive programs according to the following order of preference:
  • Permanent resident of Ontario;
  • Permanent resident of other provinces or territories in Canada; and
  • Other applicants.
5.2. Publication 5.2.1. The college will maintain a central admissions publication, which is a compilation of the admission requirements and selection procedures for each program of instruction, waiting list information and an admissions decision review procedure. 5.2.2. The publication will be made available to the public in both print and electronic format. The Durham College website and particularly the program pages will be deemed to contain the most current information as changes will be made as required throughout the admissions cycle. 5.2.3. In cases where admission requirements for a post-secondary program of instruction at the college are changed in the direction of greater stringency, applicants are to be given a minimum of 18 months notice before the change is implemented. 5.2.4. Durham College strives to ensure the accuracy of the information in its publication. Academic curriculum is continually reviewed and revised to ensure program quality and relevancy. As such, the college reserves the right to modify or cancel any course, program, fee, procedure, timetable or campus location at any time. The college website should be consulted for the most current information. 5.3. Domestic application process 5.3.1. A domestic applicant wishing to apply to a first-year, first-semester postsecondary program initiates the process by submitting an application through ontariocolleges.ca. 5.3.2. A domestic applicant wishing to reapply to a first-year, first-semester post-secondary program must repeat all components of the admission process for that program, including submitting an application through ontariocolleges.ca. 5.3.3. All domestic applications for Durham College received by ontariocolleges.ca are sent electronically within published deadlines. Each applicant receives acknowledgement both in writing and by e-mail that their application(s) have been received by the College. 5.3.4. All domestic applications received on or before February 1 for Fall intakes, October 1 for Winter intakes and January 1 for Spring intakes will be given equal consideration. Applications received after these dates will be processed on a first-come, first-served basis and consideration will be based on seat availability at the time of application. 5.3.5. After the equal consideration date has passed, all domestic applications to undersubscribed programs are assessed according to college and program eligibility criteria. 5.3.6. After the equal consideration date has passed, all domestic applications to highly competitive (oversubscribed) programs are ranked, based upon the pre-determined selection criteria for the program. This may include academic grades and/or other assessment materials. The highest ranked applicants are either issued an offer of admission offer or placed on a waiting list. 5.3.7. Once all applications have been assessed, the first release of admission offers takes place. Qualified domestic applicants will receive either a full offer of admission or a conditional offer of admission in writing and by email. 5.3.8. Once a domestic applicant receives an offer of admission, they will either accept or decline the offer through ontariocolleges.ca. If the applicant accepts the offer, they will move to the next phase of the admissions process – deposit payment. If they decline the offer, the admissions department will release an offer of admission to the next available applicant. 5.3.9. The above process continues throughout the application cycle, with offers of admission being issued as long as seats in programs remain available. 5.3.10. Documents submitted by domestic applicants to the Student Recruitment and Admission Services office will be considered as property of the college and will not be returned to the applicant. 5.3.11. The supporting documents of successful and registered domestic applicants (students) will become a part of the permanent student record. 5.3.12. The supporting documents of unsuccessful and/or unregistered domestic applicants will be destroyed at the end of the application cycle. 5.3.13. Unsuccessful and/or unregistered domestic applicants wishing to apply to a program in a future application cycle will be required to complete the full admissions process, including the submission of supporting documents. 5.4. Admissions appeals 5.4.1. It is the intent of Durham College to treat all domestic applicants in a fair, transparent and equitable fashion. As such, a domestic applicant may appeal an admissions decision. The following steps will be followed in an admissions appeal:
  • The applicant must first contact the admissions officer, requesting an explanation of the admissions decision, within five (5) days of the date that the applicant was advised of the decision.
  • The admissions officer will provide the applicant with a written explanation of the admissions decision within five (5) days of the date that the applicant asked for further explanation.
  • If the applicant is not satisfied with the explanation provided, they can submit a written request to appeal the admission decision to the deputy registrar, within five (5) days of the date that the explanation was provided by admissions officer.
  • The deputy registrar, or their designate, will review the admissions decision and all corresponding communications regarding the applicant file and communicate a decision, in writing, within five (5) days of the receiving the appeal request.
  • If the applicant is not satisfied with the appeal decision, they have the right to submit a written request for a final review to the executive director/registrar, Strategic Enrolment Services. This must be completed within five (5) days of the date the original admissions decision was made.
  • The executive director/registrar, will conduct a final review of the applicant file and will communicate a decision, in writing, within five (5) business days of the date the appeal decision was communicated. All decisions are considered final at this stage.
5.5. Waiting lists 5.5.1. Waiting lists will be established for all programs where there are sufficient applications to support this activity. The number of spaces allotted for a wait list will be determined based upon data from previous application cycles. 5.5.2. Upon request, the Student Recruitment and Admission Services office will inform domestic applicants of their relative position on the waiting list. If the applicant inquires, they will be provided with a sense as to the likelihood of being offered a seat in the program, but with no guarantee that an offer will be made. 5.5.3. Waiting lists will be maintained until the fifth day of the program start. Domestic applicants remaining on the waiting list must reapply to the program the following year or next start date and repeat all components of the admissions process. 6. Roles and responsibilities 6.1. It is the responsibility of the executive director/registrar, in collaboration with the vice-president, Student Affairs, and the vice-president, Academic, to ensure this procedure is fully implemented. 6.2. It is the responsibility of the domestic applicant to ensure that any application is submitted according to published timelines and that all information related to the application is true and accurate. 6.3. It is the responsibility of the domestic applicant to submit an appeal of an admissions decision within the timelines established in this procedure. 6.4. The deputy registrar is responsible for ensuring any first-level admissions appeals are reviewed and responded to within the prescribed timelines. 6.5. It is the responsibility of the executive director/registrar to ensure that all secondlevel admissions appeals are reviewed and responded to within the prescribed timelines. 7. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act considerations
  • Alternate forms of written communications will be provided to domestic applicants upon request.
  • Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards have been considered in the development of this policy and procedure and it adheres to the principles outlined in the College’s commitment to accessibility as demonstrated by the Accessibility Plan (ADMIN-203).
8. Non-compliance implications
  • Failure to admit students according to Ministry directives may have a negative impact on the funding provided to the institution by the provincial government.
  • Failure to administer the admissions process fairly and equitably may result in complaints and appeals and could have a negative impact on the reputation and of the college and the human rights of the domestic applicant.
9. Communications plan
  • A message will be posted on ICE alerting faculty and staff of changes to this policy and procedure.
  • A message will be posted on MyCampus alerting students of this policy and procedure.
  • Applicants are advised upon receipt of the application to be aware of the details regarding the domestic policy and procedure and their responsibilities regarding this information.
10. Related forms, legislation or external resources
  • MAESD Minister’s Binding Policy Directive – Admissions Criteria
  • Postsecondary Education Quality Assessment Board, Handbook for Ontario Colleges
View policy [PDF]

Full-Time Student Access to Credit Courses Offered Through Professional and Part-time Learning

ACAD-113

Introduction

The Office of Strategic Enrolment Services, in conjunction with the Vice-President, Academic and the academic schools, will facilitate the processing of requests from fulltime students seeking access to part-time credit courses through the Centre for Professional and Part-time Learning, as part of their full course load. Factors affecting this process include, but are not limited to, course availability, appropriate start dates, and/or program policies or requirements.

1. Introduction The Office of Strategic Enrolment Services, in conjunction with the Vice-President, Academic and the academic schools, will facilitate the processing of requests from fulltime students seeking access to part-time credit courses through the Centre for Professional and Part-time Learning, as part of their full course load. Factors affecting this process include, but are not limited to, course availability, appropriate start dates, and/or program policies or requirements. 2. Purpose This policy and procedure outlines how students who are registered as full-time students at Durham College can access part-time credit courses delivered by the Centre for Professional and Part-time Learning. 3. Definitions Refer to Durham College’s Standard Definitions. 4. Policy statements 4.1. Students who take a credit course through the Centre for Professional and Part-time Learning, as part of their full course load, must have written authorization from the appropriate dean or designate. 4.2. If approved, students will be required to pay for non-tuition related fees (IT and administrative fees) for courses taken through the Centre for Professional and Part-time Learning. 4.3. Any course in excess of a program of study’s full course load shall be subject to Centre for Professional and Part-time Learning standard fees. 5. Procedure 5.1. Students must: 5.1.1. Obtain the prescribed form (Full-Time Equivalent Course Authorization) from their school office. 5.1.2. Complete the form as indicated and present it to the appropriate school office. 5.1.3. Obtain signed authorization by the school dean or designate to enroll. 5.1.4. Bring the form to the office of Strategic Enrolment Services for in-person processing. 5.1.5. Pay all non-tuition related fees (IT and administrative fees) for the authorized Professional and Part-time Learning course(s). 5.2. Students without an authorized form will pay full fees for courses delivered by the Centre for Professional and Part-time Learning. 6. Roles and responsibilities 6.1. It is the responsibility of the Vice-President, Academic to ensure that this procedure is fully implemented. 6.2. It is the responsibility of the schools to ensure consistent application to this policy and procedure and to authorize enrolment. 6.3. It is the responsibility of the Office of Strategic Enrolment Services to ensure appropriate authorization has been obtained. 6.4. It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that the Professional and Part-time Learning course is an approved equivalent to the day course and meets the graduation requirements for their program. 6.5. It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that registration is complete and that the course is recorded on their timetable. 7. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act considerations Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards have been considered in the development of this policy and procedure and it adheres to the principles outlined in the College’s commitment to accessibility as demonstrated by the Accessibility Plan (ADMIN-203). 8. Non-compliance implications Failure to comply with this policy may disadvantage a student wishing to complete program requirements. 9. Communications plan
  • A message will be posted on ICE alerting employees when new or revised policies and procedures are added to ICE.
  • A message will be posted on MyCampus alerting students when new or revised policies and procedures are added.
10. Related forms, legislation or external resources None.
VIEW POLICY [PDF]

General Education

ACAD-103

Introduction

Durham College strives to ensure that students who graduate from approved post-secondary programs are immediately employable in their field of study, able to progress in employment through the ability to continuously learn and capable of contributing positively to the society in which they live and work. General education provides an opportunity for Durham College students to learn more about themselves and the robust world they live in by better preparing them for the challenges and opportunities of their chosen career and for life in general.

GenED, Gened
  1. Introduction
Durham College strives to ensure that students who graduate from approved post-secondary programs are immediately employable in their field of study, able to progress in employment through the ability to continuously learn and capable of contributing positively to the society in which they live and work. General education provides an opportunity for Durham College students to learn more about themselves and the robust world they live in by better preparing them for the challenges and opportunities of their chosen career and for life in general. 2. Purpose This policy and procedure will provide a mechanism for complying with the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities (MTCU) Minister’s Binding Policy Directive Framework for Programs of Instruction. This directive requires each program of study to provide students with vocational, essential employability and general education courses. 3. Definitions Refer to Durham College’s Standard Definitions. 4. Policy statements 4.1. For Ontario College Diploma and Advanced Diploma programs, students must complete a minimum of three (3) elective general education courses (at least 42 hours each) in order to graduate. 4.2. General education courses must not require a prerequisite. 4.3. Exceptions to the 42 hours in length requirement must be approved by the Vice-President, Academic. 4.4. General education course credits may be transferrable among Durham College’s programs of study. 4.5. General Education is intended to engage the student in learning that incorporates breadth of study beyond the vocational field of study. 4.6. As program teams review curriculum, any changes will ensure continued compliance with the General Education policy. 5. Procedure 5.1. Proposed general education courses will be vetted through the General Education Committee to ensure general education requirements are met. The Associate Dean of the School of Interdisciplinary Studies will maintain a detailed, up-to-date record of the status of all submissions. 5.2. As programs propose curricular change (major and/or minor), the Manager, Program Review and Renewal will ensure the program is General Education compliant. Advice will be sought from the General Education Committee or Executive Dean or designate of the School of Interdisciplinary Studies, as necessary. 5.3. Once each academic year, the Executive Dean or designate from the School of Interdisciplinary Studies will issue a call for proposals for new General Education courses to college faculty. Those proposals are to be submitted to the Associate Dean of the School of Interdisciplinary Studies and compiled for review by the General Education Proposal and Course Review Committee. The Committee will assess the proposals based on subject area, content, student workload and perceived interest to students and then make recommendations for development. Any newly developed course(s) will be available to be included in a list of offerings for an upcoming academic year. Annually, the Executive Dean of the School of Interdisciplinary Studies will provide a report to the Academic Leadership Team of the newly developed courses. 6. Roles and responsibilities 6.1. The Vice-President, Academic is responsible for ensuring that the General Education Policy is fully implemented. 6.2. The Manager, Program Development and Quality Assurance is responsible for ensuring all new programs being submitted to the Credentials Validation Service (CVS) comply with MTCU’s Binding Policy Directive, Framework for Programs of Instruction – General Education requirements. 6.3. The Manager, Program Review and Renewal is responsible for ensuring that any programs proposing major and/or minor changes to the program of study will comply with the MTCU’s Binding Policy Directive, Framework for Programs of Instruction – General Education requirements. 6.4. The General Education Committee is responsible for reviewing new general education course proposals and the Executive Dean or designate, School of Interdisciplinary Studies is responsible for providing final approval. 6.5. The Executive Dean or designate of the School of Interdisciplinary Studies is responsible for providing a proposed roster of elective General Education courses to Strategic Enrolment Services and the Bookstore. 7. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act considerations Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards have been considered in the development of this policy and procedure and it adheres to the principles outlined in the College’s commitment to accessibility as demonstrated by the Accessibility Plan (ADMIN-203). 8. Non-compliance implications Failure to comply with this policy and procedure puts the College in conflict with the Minister’s directive and at risk of actions by the government. It also risks the College’s reputation for high-quality education and students’ ability to meet the necessary requirements to obtain their credential. 9. Communications plan
  • A message will be posted on ICE alerting employees when new or revised policies and procedures are added to ICE.
  • A message will be posted on MyCampus alerting students when new or revised policies and procedures are added.
10. Related forms, legislation or external resources
  • Board of Governors’ Policies: Executive Limitations: Programs of Instruction
  • MTCU’s Binding Policy Directive: Framework for Programs of Instruction
  • MTCU’s Development Program Standards
  • Postsecondary Education Quality Assessment Board: Handbook for Ontario Colleges
  • Ontario Qualifications Framework
  • General Education Committee Terms of Reference
View policy [PDF]

Grade Appeals

ACAD-111

Introduction

Grades represent the level of student mastery of course requirements. From time to time, a student may believe that an error or misapplication of a grade has been assigned. The existence and impartial operation of a grade appeals process affords recourse to students regarding assessment of their academic performance.

1. Introduction Grades represent the level of student mastery of course requirements. From time to time, a student may believe that an error or misapplication of a grade has been assigned. The existence and impartial operation of a grade appeals process affords recourse to students regarding assessment of their academic performance. 2. Purpose This policy and procedure outlines the structure within which students and employees can address academic appeals related to grading. 3. Definitions Refer to Durham College’s Standard Definitions. 4. Policy statements 4.1. Grades shall be assigned by faculty uniformly and impartially, in keeping with stated evaluation criteria noted in the published course outline. 4.2. A grade is any aspect of assessment of course-work (including tests and quizzes), co-op placements, assignments, clinical placements, field placements, or examinations. 4.3. Students have the option to appeal a decision that affects their grade in a particular course. 4.4. Grades are presumed accurate and appropriate. It is a student’s responsibility to demonstrate otherwise. 4.5. Appeals shall be based on an error or misapplication of a grade in a course or College policies. 4.6. All grade appeals shall be considered individually. 4.7. The grade appeal process shall be phased, and expeditiously administered using prescribed timelines with opportunities for resolution. 4.8. It is a student’s responsibility to initiate each phase of the appeal process. 4.9. A separate grade appeal must be completed for each grade being appealed. 5. Procedure 5.1. School-Level Academic Appeal This portion of the grades appeal process is related to grading of course-work, co-op placements, assignments, clinical placements, field placements, examinations and/or final course grades. All issues involving grades must be dealt with directly by the School that delivered the course through the process outlined below. There is no further right of appeal of a grade once the school has completed Step 2 and made a decision. 5.1.1. Step 1 – Informal
  1. A student who wishes to appeal a grade, will first speak to the faculty member within 5 business days of the release of the grade on the College learning management system (LMS) or MyCampus.
  2. The faculty member will review the concern outlined by the student.
  3. The faculty member and student will explore ways to resolve the concern.
  4. If the resolution involves a grade change; a. within the semester, the faculty member will update the LMS or b. after the final grades have been submitted, the faculty member will submit a Grade Change Form.
5.1.2. Step 2 - Formal This portion of the process is initiated if the faculty member and student are unable to resolve the issue from Step 1 and
  • to grades worth at least 20 per cent of a final grade; or
  • to cases where a student has failed the assessment worth at least 10 per cent and believes there is a major discrepancy of at least 10 per cent between the grade they earned and the grade they feel they should have earned; or
  • to courses with pass/fail final grades/assignments.
    1. Once Step 1 has been completed a student may begin a SchoolLevel Academic Appeal.
    2. To commence a School-Level Academic Appeal, the student will provide a signed written appeal (Form A: School-Level Academic Appeal) to their school administrator within 10 business days of the release of the grade on the College LMS or MyCampus along with the following information: a. A description of the basis for the grade appeal clearly describing the perceived error in grading or misapplication of the grade; b. Actions taken to date, including details in Step 1 of the procedure, along with all supporting documentation (may include but are not limited to: medical notes for self or dependents, death notification, accident report, police report, court documents, Access and Support Centre (ASC) documentation); and c. The outcome being sought (e.g. grade change, etc.).
    3. The school’s administrator will review the grade appeal and seek clarification from all parties involved, as necessary.
    4. The school’s administrator will provide a decision in writing to the faculty member and student within 10 business days of receiving the Step 2 grade appeal.
    5. If the resolution involves a grade change; a. within the semester, the faculty member will update the LMS or b. after the final grades have been submitted, the faculty member will submit a grade change form.
    6. The outcome of Step 2 will be retained in the school office where the grade appeal was initiated.
    7. A separate grade appeal must be completed for each grade being appealed.
    8. There is no further option of appeal of the grade once the school administrator has completed Step 2 of this procedure and made a final decision.
    9. Students awaiting the outcome of a grade appeal may register in the next semester of their program and enroll in all regular courses. Where a grade appeal involves academic performance in a work integrated learning opportunity, that includes but is not limited to field placement or practicum or clinical or lab or co-op, the student will not be permitted to enroll in the subsequent field placement course while awaiting the decision from Step 2.
    10. In the event that the grade being appealed is upheld, resulting in the student failing a prerequisite course, the student will be withdrawn from all courses to which that prerequisite course applies.
    11. If the result of the grade appeal leads to withdraw from a program, then the case can be referred by the student to the College-Level Academic Appeals.
    12. If the complaint is deemed to be false, frivolous, vexatious, or made in bad faith, the relevant senior administrator will meet with the student to discuss the motivation for the grade appeal and may refer the matter for review under the Durham College Student Conduct policy and procedure (ADMIN-248).
The assignment of grades is a School-Level decision and a student may not appeal the resulting grade to the College-Level Academic Appeal Committee except for reasons relating to breach of policy or procedure in the handling of the School-Level Academic Appeal. A breach of policy or procedure can include failure to adhere to the correct timelines as stated in the Step 1 or Step 2 of this procedure. In such cases, the College-Level Academic Appeal must be filed by the student within 5 business days of the student’s receipt of the decision of the School-Level Academic Appeal from Step 2. 5.2. College-Level Academic Appeal The Academic Appeals Committee reviews course-work, co-ops placements, assignments, clinical placements, field placements, examinations and/or final course grades in which a breach in process from the School-Level academic appeal has taken place or academic appeals relating to an academic decision pertaining to academic withdrawal. 5.2.1. Commencement of a College-Level Academic Appeal
  1. To commence a College-Level Academic Appeal, the student will provide a signed written appeal (FORM B: College-Level Academic Appeal) to the Associate Vice-President, Academic within 5 business days of the School-Level Academic Appeal decision along with the following supporting documents (This documentation will be referred to as the student appeal package): a. A letter of explanation outlining the grounds for the appeal clearly describing the perceived error in or misapplication of College policies, or procedures; b. A copy of the written decision by the school’s administrator from Step 2 of the School-Level Academic Appeal; c. All supporting documentation (may include but not limited to: medical notes for self or dependents, death notification, accident report, police report, court documents, ASC documentation); and d. The outcome being sought.
  2. The Associate Vice-President, Academic will a. notify the school’s administrator of the pending appeal, who will then notify the faculty member(s) involved; and b. request any documentation relating to the student grade appeal (This documentation will be referred to as the school appeal package)
  3. The Associate Vice-President, Academic will forward the student and school appeal packages to the Academic Appeals Committee chair within 5 business days.
  4. The Academic Appeals Committee chair will establish the Committee and set a hearing within 10 business days from the receipt of the school and student appeal packages.
5.2.2. Composition of the Academic Appeals Committee
  1. The Academic Appeals Committee will be composed of:
    • An Executive Dean/Dean/Director or designate from another School (this individual will not be from the same school as the student who has initiated the grade appeal);
    • A faculty member from another School (this individual will not be from the same school as the student who has initiated the grade appeal) and;
    • A Durham College student (this individual will not be from the same school as the student who has initiated the grade appeal).
  2. The appointment of the Academic Appeals Committee chair and faculty member are the responsibility of the Associate Vice President, Academic and these roles will have a term of two academic years.
  3. While the composition of the Academic Appeals Committee is not open to appeal, in selecting the committee, the Academic Appeals Committee chair will avoid conflict or appearances of bias or a conflict of interest with the appealing students.
  4. Any concerns of the student regarding the Academic Appeals Committee composition must be addressed prior to the start of the Academic Appeals hearing, in writing, to the Associate VicePresident, Academic.
5.2.3. The Academic Appeals Hearing
  1. The Academic Appeals hearing will be heard within 10 business days of the receipt of the appeal package. Any change to this requirement requires the consent of both parties, and the Academic Appeals Committee chair, and consent will not be withheld arbitrarily.
  2. The student who filed the appeal package may be represented by an advisor. (An advisor can be a peer, guardian, friend, classmate, lawyer, etc.) If the student selects a lawyer as their advisor, then the student must notify the Academic Appeals Committee chair at least 2 business days in advance of the hearing. The advisor must be identified at the beginning of the Academic Appeals Hearing, and cannot be changed during the appeal except under unusual circumstances. The advisor may provide advice or make the presentation on behalf of the student, provided that only one person, the advisor or the student speaks.
  3. If a student engages legal counsel during this process, the student will be responsible for their legal costs incurred.
  4. The advisor may call upon the student they are representing to provide testimony.
  5. The process to be followed in the hearing will be outlined by the Academic Appeals Committee chair at the commencement of the hearing.
  6. If the student is absent from the hearing, the hearing will be postponed to enable the Academic Appeals Committee chair to evaluate the reasons for the absence. The Academic Appeals Committee chair has discretion to then either reschedule the hearing, or cancel the appeal.
  7. Following introductions by the Academic Appeals Committee chair, the hearing will commence and include:
    • An opportunity for the student who filed the student appeal package to outline the reason for the appeal by elaborating on any new evidence or perceived procedural irregularity;
    • An opportunity for the faculty or designate to outline the grade assigned (this can be done in person during the hearing or by written submission);
    • An opportunity for the Academic Appeals Committee to clarify any issues raised by directing questions to the student through the Academic Appeals Committee chair; and
    • Such other practices and procedures deemed appropriate at the discretion of the Academic Appeals Committee chair.
5.2.4. Disposition The Academic Appeals Committee may order:
  • Retesting or the opportunity to complete work/assignments; or
  • Alteration or additions to imposed penalties; or
  • Reversal of academic decision that was under appeal; or
  • Upholding of academic decision that was under appeal.
Note: The requirements of accreditation or regulatory bodies, when applicable, will be used as a guide for the disposition, as the decision must align with accreditation or regulatory requirements. 5.2.5. The Decision
  1. The Academic Appeals Committee will render its decision with reasons in writing within 10 business days of the completion of the hearing.
  2. The written decision will be provided by the Academic Appeals Committee chair to the Associate Vice-President, Academic, the school’s administrator, the faculty member(s) and the student.
  3. If the resolution involves a grade change; i. within the semester, the faculty member will update the LMS or ii. after the final grades have been submitted, the faculty member will update the LMS and submit a grade change form.
  4. The decision is final and binding on all parties, with no further appeal allowed.
A student may withdraw their request for a College-Level Academic Appeal prior to the scheduled hearing date. 6. Roles and responsibilities 6.1. It is the responsibility of the Vice-President, Academic to ensure that the Grade Appeals policy and procedure is fully implemented. 6.2. It is the responsibility of the student to initiate the School-Level and CollegeLevel Academic Appeals process within the established timelines. 6.3. It is the responsibility of the school’s administrator to provide the student with a written decision from the School-Level Academic Appeal within the established timelines. 6.4. It is the responsibility of the Academic Appeal Committee chair to craft and provide a written decision to the student, faculty member(s), Associate Vice President, Academic and school administrator of the outcome of their CollegeLevel Academic Appeal within the established timelines. 6.5. It is the responsibility of the Office of the Associate Vice-President, Academic to establish and train an Academic Appeals Committee. 7. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act considerations Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards have been considered in the development of this policy and procedure and it adheres to the principles outlined in the College’s commitment to accessibility as demonstrated by the Accessibility Plan (ADMIN-203). 8. Non-compliance implications Failure to comply with this policy may affect the integrity of the grade appeal process and the final disposition of the student’s academic grade. 9. Communications plan
  • A message will be posted on ICE alerting employees when new or revised policies and procedures are added to ICE.
  • A message will be posted on MyCampus alerting students when new or revised policies and procedures are added.
10. Related forms, legislation or external resources
  • Minister’s Binding Policy Directive on Frameworks for Programs of Instruction
View policy [PDF]Supporting Document 1Supporting Document 2

International Admissions

ACAD-107

Introduction

Durham College offers a diverse mix of high-quality, relevant programs for career focused students. Admission standards are a clear signal to prospective students about the preparation needed to succeed in college, and the admission process must be carried out in an objective and transparent manner.

Introduction

Durham College offers a diverse mix of high-quality, relevant programs for career focused students. Admission standards are a clear signal to prospective students about the preparation needed to succeed in college, and the admission process must be carried out in an objective and transparent manner.

Purpose

This policy and procedure provides a framework by which all prospective international students shall be considered for full-time admission into a post-secondary program at Durham College.

Definitions

Refer to Durham College’s Standard Definitions.

Policy statements

All international applicants have the right to fair and equitable assessment for admissions as per the application deadlines. Admission requirements shall be established on a program-specific basis, by the academic school at the time of program approval. A program may require applicants to meet additional or alternative admission criteria. Admission requirements can only be revised 18 months prior to the start of an academic year. An international applicant may be issued a conditional offer of admission to a program, provided that the applicant has indicated their intent to complete an outstanding admission requirement within a stipulated timeframe, prior to the start of the academic term to which they have applied. Failure to do so will result in the revoking of the conditional offer and/or the removal of the student from their program. Meeting minimum admission requirements does not guarantee admission into a course or program. International applicants not admitted to the program of their choice may be offered the opportunity to apply for a different program. International applicants may apply to a maximum of two (2) program choices at the time of application. Program availability varies by semester and is subject to change. Program availability is defined by Durham College International Education Office and the Office of Strategic Enrolment Services. Students seeking readmission to Durham College shall be subject to current program admission requirements and may be subject to additional conditions. Durham College retains the right to refuse readmission to international students who have been suspended or dismissed from the institution, for either academic or non-academic reasons. Durham College retains the right to refuse readmission to international students who have not met their immigration conditions of study as set out on their study permits and/or Canadian immigration laws, rules and regulations. It is the responsibility of the international applicant to ensure that application information and all supporting documentation is truthful, complete and correct. Durham College reserves the right to verify the authenticity of any documentation provided as part of an application. If it is proven, or if Durham College has reasonable grounds to conclude that false information has been provided, the application will be denied. International applicants not admitted shall receive an email from the Durham College International Education Office stating the reason for non-admission. International students may apply through educational agencies. Random selection will not be used as an applicant selection technique.

Procedure

Selection Process The Durham College International Education Office will consider all international applicants to Durham College in an equitable, consistent and transparent manner. The selection process for all international applicants involves the:
  • Determination of college eligibility; and
  • Determination of program eligibility
To be considered for admission to the college in a certificate, diploma, or advanced diploma program, an international applicant must be a holder of an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent as determined by Durham College international admissions team. College eligibility – compressed fast track or graduate certificates To be considered for admission to the college in a compressed fast track or graduate certificate program, an international applicant must provide proof they have completed the equivalent of an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent and a college diploma/advanced diploma or university degree as determined by Durham College’s international admissions team. College eligibility – degree programs To be considered for admission to the college in a degree program an international applicant must provide proof they have completed the equivalent of an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) with six university/college courses at the Grade 12 level or equivalent as determined by Durham College’s international admissions team. Program eligibility
  • It is recognized that in order to benefit from the program of instruction, certain knowledge, aptitudes and skills are required. Program eligibility criteria are established on a program-specific basis by the academic departments, in consultation with the executive director and registrar and are approved by the vicepresident, Academic.
  • Program eligibility criteria must be relevant to the program and capable of objective demonstration or measurement.
  • If questionnaires are used for applicant selection, they must include the following notification to comply with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act: In accordance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act, your personal information is collected, retained and reported to the Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development under the legal authority of the Ontario Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology Act, 2002. MTCU collects student level enrolment-related data, which includes limited personal information such as Ontario Education Numbers, student characteristics and educational outcomes, in order to administer government post-secondary funding, policies and programs, including planning, evaluation and monitoring activities. Your personal information may also be used or disclosed for administrative, information technology, law enforcement, statistical or research purposes of the College or ministries and agencies of the Ontario and federal governments. Further details are available at our Privacy page (http://www.durhamcollege.ca/about-us/legalprivacy) or by contacting the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Coordinator, President’s Office, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, ON L1G 0C5, 905.721.2000 ext. 3292
  • Where selection criteria include aptitude tests, interviews, campus orientation or other selection tools requiring mandatory college visits, alternative arrangements will be made available for international applicants.
English Language Proficiency Durham College has established English language entry levels for all of its programs. International applicants, for whom English is not a first language, must provide proof of English language proficiency as an admission requirement for their selected program. International applicants are normally required to complete an internationally recognized test such as the International English Language Testing System (IELTS), Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or Canadian Academic English Language Assessment (CAEL), or the Cambridge English Language Assessment. International applicants will be assessed according to the program admissions criteria, based on their academic transcripts and English language proficiency. International applicants, who have been educated outside Canada, must submit proof of their academic record to the College. Documents submitted in languages other than English must be submitted with a certified true translation. Publication  The college will maintain a central admissions publication, which is a compilation of the admission requirements and selection procedures for each program of instruction, waiting list information and an admissions decision review procedure. The publication will be made available to the public in both print and electronic format. The Durham College website and particularly the program pages will be deemed to contain the most current information as changes will be made as required throughout the admissions cycle. In cases where admission requirements for a post-secondary program of instruction at the college are changed in the direction of greater stringency, applicants are to be given a minimum of 18 months notice before the change is implemented. International application process  An international applicant wishing to apply to a first-year, first-semester post-secondary program initiates the process by submitting an application through the Durham College International online application system: www.durhamcollege.ca/intapp. An international applicant wishing to reapply to a first-year, first-semester post-secondary program must: a) If in Canada: meet with an international admissions officer b) If outside of Canada: e-mail: internationalapplications@durhamcollege.ca for further instructions All international applications for Durham College received though Durham College International online application system and/or (ontariocolleges.ca) are sent electronically within published deadlines. Each applicant receives acknowledgement by e-mail that their application(s) have been received by the College. All international applications received will be processed on a first-come, first-served basis and consideration will be based on seat availability at the time of application. All international applications to highly competitive (oversubscribed) programs may be ranked, based upon the pre-determined selection criteria for the program. This may include academic grades and/or other assessment materials. The highest ranked applicants are either issued an offer of admission offer or placed on a waiting list. Once all applications have been assessed, the first release of admission offers takes place. Qualified international applicants will receive either a full offer of admission or a conditional offer of admission and will be sent instructions by email and through mycampus.ca - the college student portal. Once an international applicant receives an offer of admission, they will either accept or decline the offer through mycampus.ca. If the applicant accepts the offer, they will move to the next phase of the admissions process – payment of fees. Payment of first semester fees secures the seat for the international applicant. 3.8. The above process continues throughout the application cycle, with offers of admission being issued as long as seats in programs remain available. 5.3.9. Documents submitted by international applicants to the Durham College International Education office will be considered as property of the college and will not be returned to the applicant. 5.3.10. All documents must be submitted via Durham College International Application System or as requested by the international admissions team. 5.3.11. The supporting documents of successful and registered international applicants (students) will become a part of the permanent student record. 5.3.12. The supporting documents of unsuccessful and/or unregistered international applicants will be destroyed at the end of the application cycle. 5.3.13. Unsuccessful and/or unregistered international applicants wishing to apply to a program in a future application cycle will be required to complete the full admissions process, including the submission of supporting documents. 5.4. Admissions appeals It is the intent of Durham College to treat all international applicants in a fair, transparent and equitable manner. As such, an international applicant may appeal an admissions decision. The following steps will be followed in an admissions appeal: • The applicant must contact the Durham College International Admissions office, requesting an explanation of the admissions decision, within five (5) days of the date that the applicant was advised of the decision. • Durham College International Admissions office will provide the applicant with a written explanation of the admissions decision, within five (5) days of the date that the applicant asked for further explanation. • The Senior International Admissions Officer, or their designate, will review the admissions decision and all corresponding communications regarding the applicant file and communicate a decision, in writing, within five (5) days of the receiving the appeal request. • If the applicant is not satisfied with the appeal decision, they have the right to submit a written request for a final review to the manager of international admissions and recruitment. This must be completed within five (5) days of the date the original admissions decision was made. The manager of international admissions and recruitment will conduct a final review of the applicant file and will communicate a decision, in writing, within five (5) business days of the date the appeal decision was communicated. All decisions are considered final at this stage. 5.5. Waiting Lists 5.5.1. Waiting lists will be established for all programs where there are sufficient applications to support this activity. The number of spaces allotted for a wait list will be determined based upon data from previous application cycles. 5.5.2. Upon request, the Durham College International Admissions office will inform international applicants of their relative position on the waiting list. 5.5.3. Waiting lists will be maintained until the fifth day of the program start. International applicants remaining on the waiting list must reapply to the program the following year or next start date and repeat the admissions process. 6. Roles and responsibilities 6.1. It is the responsibility of the dean of International Education/manager of International Admissions and Recruitment, in collaboration with the executive director and registrar, and the vice-president, Academic, to ensure this procedure is fully implemented. 6.2. It is the responsibility of the international applicant to ensure that any application is submitted according to published timelines and that all information related to the application is true and accurate. 6.3. It is the responsibility of the international applicant to be aware of the program admission and English proficiency requirements as set out by the Durham College International Education Office. 6.4. It is the responsibility of the international applicant to submit an appeal of an admissions decision within the timelines established in this procedure. 6.5. It is the responsibility of the senior international admissions officer to ensure that any first-level admissions appeals are reviewed and responded to within the prescribed timelines. 6.6. It is the responsibility of the dean of International Education/manager of International Admissions and Recruitment to ensure that all second level admissions appeals are reviewed and responded to within the prescribed timelines. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act considerations Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards have been considered in the development of this policy and procedure and it adheres to the principles outlined in the College’s commitment to accessibility as demonstrated by the Accessibility Plan (ADMIN-203). 8. Non-compliance implications Failure to administer the admissions process fairly and equitably may result in complaints and appeals and could have a negative impact on the reputation and of the college and the human rights of the international applicant. 9. Communications plan • A message will be posted on ICE alerting employees when new or revised policies and procedures are added to ICE. • A message will be posted on MyCampus alerting students when new or revised policies and procedures are added. • International applicants are advised upon receipt of the application to be aware of the details regarding the international admissions policy and procedure and their responsibilities regarding this information. 10. Related forms, legislation or external resources None.
View policy [PDF]

International Student Withdrawal and Refund

ADMIN-240

Introduction

Fees for an academic term, or in some cases an entire academic year, should be paid by international students before a student can apply for their study permit through the Canadian High Commission. In several countries, such as India and China, this is a mandatory requirement of the study permit. In all cases, the fees must be paid before a student is entitled to register for their courses. Durham College recognizes that because there is uncertainty surrounding a student receiving or being denied a study permit, and other considerations that may cause the student to change their mind about studying at Durham College, there needs to be a policy governing withdrawals and refunds and a procedure to outline the steps students must take in order to apply to have their fees refunded.

1. Introduction Fees for an academic term, or in some cases an entire academic year, should be paid by international students before a student can apply for their study permit through the Canadian High Commission. In several countries, such as India and China, this is a mandatory requirement of the study permit. In all cases, the fees must be paid before a student is entitled to register for their courses. Durham College recognizes that because there is uncertainty surrounding a student receiving or being denied a study permit, and other considerations that may cause the student to change their mind about studying at Durham College, there needs to be a policy governing withdrawals and refunds and a procedure to outline the steps students must take in order to apply to have their fees refunded. 2. Purpose Durham College’s International Student Withdrawal and Refund policy and procedure have been developed to be in compliance with the Ministry of Training, Colleges, and Universities (MTCU) fee and refund policy and Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) guidelines, including separate guidelines for students applying for their study permit through the Student Partners Program (SPP) for India and China. 3. Definitions Refer to Durham College’s Standard Definitions. 4. Policy statements 4.1. In order to be eligible for a refund, written withdrawal and refund requests must be received by the end of business on the published withdrawal deadline date. After this date only fees paid for subsequent semesters will be refunded. 4.2. Students who have landed in Canada and received a Canadian study permit based on a valid offer letter from Durham College are expected to register at Durham College in the program to which they were admitted and to complete the semester for which they have paid tuition. 4.4. Durham College recognizes that there are some unforeseen circumstances in which a student may need to request to leave Durham College (withdraw), and request a refund of their tuition fees. 4.5. If an international student has not received a decision on their study permit, or is unable to attend classes by the start date on their offer letter, they must notify the International Office in writing before the withdrawal deadline in order to be eligible for a deferral or a refund. The deferral must be approved by the Durham College International Office. 4.6. Students who withdraw give up their admission to and status as a Durham College student and must return their Student Identification Card to the International Office. A student who withdraws and later wishes to return to Durham College must reapply for admission. 4.7. The International Office reports on students who withdraw, to Citizenship and Immigration Canada and Canadian Border Services. 4.8. If a student who has applied under the SPP India program receives a study permit rejection by the Canadian High Commission, Durham College is not permitted to offer a deferral to them under SPP Program policy. 4.9. There are several reasons why a student may require to request a withdrawal from Durham College including (but not limited to) the following: 4.9.1. study permit refusal; 4.9.2. decision not to pursue studies in Canada due to unforeseen circumstances before landing in Canada; 4.9.3. choosing not to pursue studies at Durham College after the student has landed in Canada and has received a Canadian study permit based on a valid offer letter from Durham College; 4.9.4. decision not to pursue studies at Durham College and to return to home country after landing in Canada. 4.10. In any of these cases, the student may be eligible to receive a refund of the fees paid to Durham College. Certain fees are withheld from student refunds. 5. Procedure 5.1. For all refunds the following procedures will be followed 5.1.1. All international student refund requests must be in writing and received through the International Office or they will not be processed. Send all requests to intlfinance@durhamcollege.ca. Documents may be dropped off in person to the International Office but all correspondence regarding the refund will be done through email. 5.1.2. Students who have landed in Canada and have a valid Canadian study permit and wish to withdraw from Durham College for any reason including transferring to another college or returning home, must book an in-person appointment with the International Office to complete and sign an official withdrawal form to be eligible for any refund. To book an appointment, email: intlfinance@durhamcollege.ca. If a student arrives to withdraw without a booked appointment, they may need to return at a different time or on a different day, depending on the schedule of staff. 5.1.3. After contacting intlfinance@durhamcollege.ca, students will be sent an email confirmation and a list of documents that must be completed, signed and returned before a request can be processed. 5.1.4. Students must submit all necessary documentation in a secure manner when possible (in person, emailed, by post, or courier) for the refund, by the deadline of 4:30 p.m. (EST) on the withdrawal deadline. For any requests received after this deadline, no refund for first semester fees will be issued. For withdrawals after the withdrawal deadline, only subsequent semester fees paid will be reimbursed. 5.1.5. The following documentation, as specified below, is required by the withdrawal deadline for all refund or withdrawal requests. Additional documents may be required at the discretion of the Executive Director, International. Incomplete packages will not be processed: a) Signed Request to Withdraw Form – provided by the International Office; b) Copy of a student’s valid passport for identification purposes (face and address pages); c) Copy of the student’s valid Canadian study permit, if they have landed in Canada; d) Appropriately filled out Wire Transfer Form (to be completed on computer where possible); e) Signed Third Party Refund Transfer Request Form (if applicable); and f) Durham College Student ID card (if obtained by the student). 5.1.6. The refund will be transferred to the student’s bank account or, upon completion of a Third Party Refund Transfer Request form, to a relative, third party (other than the student’s agent or other agent) or a new school by wire transfer only. No checks will be issued. 5.1.7. Provided that all documentation and conditions outlined above and below are met, a refund will be authorized for the total fees paid, less the amounts to be withheld as outlined on the attached fee listing, plus any direct costs incurred to process refunds, such as wire transfer fees charged by the bank. 5.2. Study permit refusals 5.2.1. In addition to the documentation outlined in item A5, the following documentation is also required by the withdrawal deadline to process a visa refusal refund. Additional documents may also be required under special circumstances:
  • The refusal letter from the Canadian High Commission.
5.2.2. IMPORTANT – If a student has not received a decision on their study permit, or is unable to attend classes by the start date on their offer letter, they must notify the International Office in writing before the withdrawal deadline in order to be eligible for a deferral or a refund. No exceptions will be made. 5.3. Transferring to another college or university Students who have landed in Canada and have received a Canadian study permit based on a valid offer letter from Durham College, must additionally comply with the following in order to be considered for a refund if they wish to study elsewhere. 5.3.1. Under CIC guidelines, students will only be issued a study permit if they can show a letter of acceptance from a Designated Learning Institution (DLI). Therefore, students seeking to study elsewhere, must show the International Office proof of admission to another Canadian postsecondary institution that has been granted a Designated Learning Institution number (DLI#) for the semester to which they were originally admitted to Durham College. Please visit the Citizenship and Immigration Canada website for a searchable listing of DLI institutions. 5.3.2. In addition to the documentation outlined in item A5, the following documentation is required by the withdrawal deadline to process a refund for transfer to another college or university. Additional documents may be required under special circumstances. a) A copy of a valid letter of admission to another approved college or university as noted in Section C1 must be received and verified as authentic by the International Office, before a withdrawal will be approved; and b) Receipt for the initial deposit of $1500.00 CAD or greater and confirmation of enrolment from the other college or university. 5.3.3. Refunds will be transferred to the new college or university that the student is admitted to by check or wire transfer only. There will be no refunds directly to the student. 5.3.4. Durham College will report transfers to other schools to Citizenship and Immigration Canada and Canadian Border Services as study permits are issued based on letters of admission to Durham College. 5.4. Withdrawing to return to home country (after landing in Canada) 5.4.1. In addition to the documentation listed in section A5, the following documentation is required by the withdrawal deadline, to process a refund for students returning to their home country:
  • A copy of student’s valid passport for identification purposes – showing all pages and the landing stamp of the home country; and
  • A copy of a one-way plane ticket home. Additional documents may be required under special circumstances.
5.4.2. Citizenship and Immigration Canada will be notified to cancel the student’s study permit 5.5. Deferrals to next intake at Durham College – for students not in Canada 5.5.1. No deferrals will be made for students who have already landed in Canada 5.5.2. Students who wish to defer their offer of admission to the next available intake must: a) Submit their request in writing to intlfinance@durhamcollege.ca. b) Submit all necessary documentation by 4:30 p.m. (EST) on the withdrawal deadline date. No deferral and no transfer of first semester fees paid will be issued for requests received after the withdrawal deadline. No exceptions will be made. c) Complete, sign and submit a Request for Deferral Form by the withdrawal deadline. 5.5.3. Please note that students will only be allowed one deferral. All other requests will be denied and students will be instructed to reapply for admission to Durham College. 5.5.4. If an SPP India student visa is rejected by CIC, Durham College is not permitted to offer a deferral under the policy of the SPP program. As an SPP school, the College must adhere to the SPP policies. 6. Roles and responsibilities 6.1. It is the responsibility of the Executive Director of International Education, in collaboration with the Vice-President, Academic, to ensure this procedure is fully implemented. 7. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act considerations Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards have been considered in the development of this policy and procedure and it adheres to the principles outlined in the College’s commitment to accessibility as demonstrated by the Accessibility Plan (ADMIN-203). 8. Non-compliance implications Failure to comply with this policy could undermine the integrity of the Canadian Immigration system and cause financial and reputational damage to the college. It may also cause financial and/or immigration difficulty for international students. 9. Communications plan
  • A message will be posted on ICE alerting employees when new or revised policies and procedures are added to ICE.
  • A message will be posted on MyCampus alerting students when new or revised policies and procedures are added.
10. Related forms, legislation or external resources
  • Citizenship and Immigration Canada – Canadian High Commission, New Delhi, Consulate General of Canada, Chandigarh – Canada-In-India & ACCC Student Partners Program (SPP) – Program Extension Proposal
  • Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities – Tuition and Ancillary Fees Reporting Operating Procedure
View policy [PDF]

Learning Management System Data Retention

ACAD-129

Introduction

The purpose of this policy and procedure is to outline the retention period of the digital data stored within the Durham College Learning Management System (LMS). The LMS is intended as a teaching and learning aid for faculty and students and not as a record keeping repository of student data or course content. A retention schedule for the digital data stored within the Learning Management System is essential to ensure:

  • Integrity of system data
  • The database and application size is managed for optimal performance of the system.
  • The storage space is used efficiently to minimize potential financial impact of system and disk storage expenses.
  • Confidentiality and privacy of our students’ personal information

1. Introduction The purpose of this policy and procedure is to outline the retention period of the digital data stored within the Durham College Learning Management System (LMS). The LMS is intended as a teaching and learning aid for faculty and students and not as a record keeping repository of student data or course content. A retention schedule for the digital data stored within the Learning Management System is essential to ensure:
  • Integrity of system data
  • The database and application size is managed for optimal performance of the system.
  • The storage space is used efficiently to minimize potential financial impact of system and disk storage expenses.
  • Confidentiality and privacy of our students’ personal information
2. Purpose This policy and procedure provides the framework for the content management of Durham College’s LMS. 3. Definitions Refer to Durham College’s Standard Definitions. 4. Policy statements This policy only applies to the Durham College LMS, it does not apply to the Ontario Learn LMS. 4.1. LMS Data Retention is based on the following principles: a) Course content in the LMS should not be kept indefinitely and will have to be scheduled for destruction from the system periodically in accordance with the disposition assigned in the Durham College Common Records Schedule b) Course teaching content must be maintained long enough to allow faculty continuity. c) Some courses have differing life spans and could be immune to the LMS data retention schedule and will be administered on a case-by-case basis by ITS in conjunction with Academic input. d) The student data and the course content of an LMS course are considered separately. e) The student data stored in the LMS is not considered to be part of the permanent student record. The final grade is transferred to the permanent student record stored in Banner at the end of each course. 4.2. In consideration of all the influencing factors and in keeping with other student success obligations, LMS data will be scheduled for destruction at the end of three years. Exceptions to this schedule may include manually managed courses and other designated courses as identified by IT Services or the Associate Vice-President Academics office. 4.3. Durham College will not be responsible for student data beyond one calendar year based on the course end date in LMS. This aligns with the Durham College Common Records Schedule retention period for transitory items - STU40 Student Records. 4.4. Adequate notice regarding the disposition of content and data on the LMS will be provided to the Durham College community. 4.5. The deletion of any LMS data is final and irrevocable. 5. Procedure 5.1. Creating a list of courses scheduled for destruction
  • Once a year during the month of April, the LMS Administrators group of IT Services will generate a list of courses housed within the LMS that are more than three years old.
  • The list of courses will contain Banner courses and custom courses such as manually managed and sandbox courses.
5.2. Identifying courses to be destroyed
  • Using the course CRN, each School/Department will receive a list of their courses that are more than three years old in the month of April.
  • Each School/Department will examine the list of courses and identify any courses that they would like to request be exempted from the scheduled destruction by the end of May. The stakeholder is required to provide a reason for the requested exemption to the Academic IT Analyst using the LMS Data Exemption Request Form.
  • Once the stakeholders have had an opportunity to submit their request for exemptions, the Academic IT Analyst will compile a revised list of courses scheduled for destruction.
  • This revised list of courses will be shared with the Executive Deans/Deans and Associate Deans for review and approval in the month of June. Any requested changes will be submitted to the Academic IT Analyst.
  • The final list of courses scheduled for destruction and a list of courses exempted for destruction along with an explanation for exemption will be provided to the Office of the Vice President Academic for final approval by the end of June.
5.3. Deleting the identified courses
  • IT Services will complete the destruction of the identified courses in July or August. A certificate of destruction will be issued by the LMS Service Provider and provided to the Records Manager.
6. Roles and responsibilities 6.1. The Durham College Leadership Team is responsible for reviewing and approving the policies, procedures, and other controls required for security, life cycle management, risk management, and quality assurance of College information. 6.2. The Chief Administrative Officer is responsible for overseeing Information Management and delegating responsibility for information management to the appropriate individuals. 6.3. The Office of the VP Academic Office is responsible for overseeing the LMS Data Disposition and Destruction process. 6.4. The Records Manager is responsible for developing and recommending to the Chief Administrative Officer and Chief Information Officer policies, procedures, standards and guidelines and other controls for the information life cycle management, risk management, quality assurance, appropriate use and security of information. 6.5. The Chief Information Officer, Freedom of Information and Privacy Coordinator and Records Manager are responsible for implementing and maintaining the security controls that enforce rules and procedures for information management. 6.6. It is the responsibility of the Academic IT Analyst and the Records Manager to work with IT Services and the Communications and Marketing department to implement the communications plan notifying the college community of the pending LMS data destruction. 6.7. It is the responsibility of the Academic IT Analyst, Records Manager and IT Services to work with the LMS Service Providers to ensure the LMS Data Destruction has been completed. 7. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act considerations Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards have been considered in the development of this policy and procedure and it adheres to the principles outlined in the College’s commitment to accessibility as demonstrated by the Accessibility Plan (ADMIN-203). 8. Non-compliance implications Non-compliance could affect the usability of the LMS and/or the performance of the system as a whole. Durham College could also incur additional storage costs from the LMS vendor. 9. Communications plan A message will be posted on ICE alerting faculty and staff to this policy and on DC Connect alerting students to this policy. Faculty and students will be informed via email prior to the scheduled LMS Data Destruction being completed. 10. Related forms, legislation or external resources None.
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Learning Management System Usage

ACAD-118

Introduction

The learning management system (LMS) provides organized, consistent and timely course-related communication between faculty and students. Effective use of the LMS is intended to assist faculty with course administration while supporting student engagement, increasing flexible learning opportunities, and enabling quality learning experiences. The LMS provides an efficient and effective vehicle for ongoing formative student feedback.

DCConnect 1. Introduction The learning management system (LMS) provides organized, consistent and timely course-related communication between faculty and students. Effective use of the LMS is intended to assist faculty with course administration while supporting student engagement, increasing flexible learning opportunities, and enabling quality learning experiences. The LMS provides an efficient and effective vehicle for ongoing formative student feedback. 2. Purpose In keeping with both Durham College’s mission that the student experience comes first and the teaching principles noted in the College’s Faculty Teaching Skills and Abilities document, this policy and procedure outlines expectations for use of the College’s LMS for the provision of consistent and effective student communications and to provide increased options for supporting student engagement. 3. Definitions Refer to Durham College’s Standard Definitions. 4. Policy statements 4.1. Durham College holds to the following values and related beliefs: 4.1.1. Students benefit from a consistent approach in the use of the LMS. 4.1.2. Students and employees are active partners in the teaching and learning process. 4.1.3. The College’s use of the LMS will encourage communication:
  • Between faculty and students;
  • Between students and their peers; and
  • Between students and the course learning materials.
4.1.4. Effective use of the LMS by a student:
  • Supports time-on-task;
  • Fosters interpersonal communication with faculty and peers;
  • Ensures connection to the course materials and course expectations;
  • Complements face-to-face interactions, where applicable; and
  • Provides ongoing performance feedback.
4.1.5. Effective use of the LMS by a faculty member:
  • Encourages a learner-centric approach to teaching;
  • Supports collaborative learning;
  • Supports active learning;
  • Supports individualized learning and different learning preferences;
  • Supports effective assessment strategies;
  • Enhances effective, consistent, and timely communication; and
  • Encourages greater access to course material
4.2. Durham College is responsible for providing training and support for faculty and students using its LMS. 4.3. Faculty must utilize the facilities of our LMS to support teaching and learning. 4.4. Students shall be informed of the expectations regarding the use of the LMS and LMS resources to support their learning via the faculty member and other College/program documents. 4.5. Students with unresolved technical difficulties that relate to the LMS must notify the IT Support Service desk and provide their professor with the IT Support Service desk ticket number. 5. Procedure 5.1. Required use of the LMS 5.1.1. Faculty members shall encourage time-on-task and effective communications in the LMS by: a) Using the Announcement tool to welcome new students and broadcast relevant class communications; b) Posting all important course-related dates in the Calendar tool; c) Posting their College e-mail, telephone contact information, and office location; and d) Stating their preferred method of electronic communication and setting an accurate expectation as to their intended response time. 5.1.2. Effectively communicate grade information: a) Set up the grade book to match the published course outline b) Post and reveal each student’s grades for all assessments on a timely and ongoing basis within the parameters of access to student records and protection of privacy policies and procedures. c) Faculty will submit mid-term grades and final calculated grades for all courses. 5.1.3. Make relevant content available: a) Post the approved course outline from MyCampus. b) Faculty will post notice of absence or lateness, if reasonably possible. c) Faculty will make every reasonable effort to adhere to copyright and AODA laws when posting information. 5.2. Expanded use of the LMS In the spirit of continuous improvement, faculty will be expected to develop their expertise in utilizing the functionality of the LMS. Examples of this functionality could include: 5.2.1. Feedback a) Faculty should look for ways to facilitate the workflow and timely return of assignments as they are created, submitted, marked and returned. b) Faculty should utilize the assessment capabilities of the LMS to provide self-assessment and marks-based assessment opportunities (e.g. quiz tool, assignments tool). 5.2.2. Content a) Faculty should make their course materials available in the LMS, in a variety of accessible formats such as documents or pre-built LMS tools (e.g. links, learning modules, HTML pages), as appropriate. b) Faculty may utilize pre-built templates for online, hybrid or in-class courses. 5.2.3. Student engagement a) Faculty should leverage the online environment to enrich the classroom experience (e.g. discussion tool, online readings). b) Faculty should try to accommodate different learning preferences through the use of online tools, multimedia, and other accessible methods of communication. 5.3. Orientation to the LMS 5.3.1. Faculty will familiarize the students with how to best use the LMS for their course. Expectations regarding use of the LMS functions and the preferred communication protocol will be clearly articulated by faculty along with the timing and availability of marks, as well as in College and program documents. 5.3.2. Students who have technical difficulty that prevents them from completing academic work related to the functioning of the LMS must contact the IT Support Services desk and obtain a ticket number. The student provides this number to the faculty. The faculty member can elect to make an exception to acceptance of the late submissions based on this information/evidence of technical difficulty. 6. Roles and responsibilities 6.1. It is the responsibility of the Vice-President, Academic to ensure this policy and procedure is fully implemented. 6.2. It is the responsibility of each faculty member to develop their skills and abilities and use the LMS functions/system to support the learning environment. 6.3. It is the responsibility of the Dean to ensure faculty have access to professional development to support skill development in the use of the LMS system. 6.4. It is the responsibility of the Dean to ensure faculty are meeting the minimum requirements of this policy and procedure. 6.5. It is the responsibility of the Centre for Academic and Faculty Enrichment (C.A.F.E.) to provide training, support and resources for faculty on the use of the LMS functions to support the learning environment. 6.6. It is the responsibility of IT Support Services to support students with technical difficulties with respect to the LMS. 7. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act considerations Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards have been considered in the development of this policy and procedure and it adheres to the principles outlined in the College’s commitment to accessibility as demonstrated by the Accessibility Plan (ADMIN-203). 8. Non-compliance implications Non-compliance negatively affects the learning environment and results in performance issues for all parties outlined in this policy. 9. Communications plan
  • A message will be posted on ICE alerting employees when new or revised policies and procedures are added to ICE.
  • A message will be posted on MyCampus alerting students when new or revised policies and procedures are added.
10. Related forms, legislation or external resources
  • None.
View policy [PDF]

New Program Development and Approval

ACAD-104

Introduction

Excellence in academic programming is a cornerstone of realizing the mission and vision for Durham College. Durham College develops new academic programs that are aligned with its strategic priorities, and that respond to the needs of its community, industry and students. The development of academic programs that address economic and societal needs is a critical factor in the future success of the college.

1. Introduction Excellence in academic programming is a cornerstone of realizing the mission and vision for Durham College. Durham College develops new academic programs that are aligned with its strategic priorities, and that respond to the needs of its community, industry and students. The development of academic programs that address economic and societal needs is a critical factor in the future success of the college. 2. Purpose This policy and procedure provides a framework for the consideration, development, submission for review, and approval of all new academic programs of instruction that meet the college’s quality assurance standards and strategic priorities. 3. Definitions Refer to Durham College’s Standard Definitions. 4. Policy statements 4.1. Demographic shifts, new technologies, employment trends, global competition, provincial strategic priorities or initiatives, and the development of new student markets necessitate ongoing consideration and development of new post-secondary program opportunities. 4.2. Proposals to initiate new programs will be guided by: 4.2.1. Alignment with Durham College’s mission, vision, and values, the Strategic Mandate Agreement and the strategic and academic plan, and in accordance with the relevant Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities (MTCU) policies and directives, other post-secondary approval bodies, and where applicable industry standards or certifications. 4.2.2. A decision-making process for the development of new programs that is transparent, consultative and evidence-based, with an identified accountability process for implementation. 4.2.3. Student demand, community needs, educational pathways, employment trends and employer needs, availability of qualified faculty, space, equipment and resource implications, the College’s financial health, program sustainability, and the College’s existing compliment of programs. 4.3. The decision to advance or defer the development of a new program can occur at any time during the process. 4.4. New programs and courses must be designed to be consistent with the Ontario MTCU Minister’s Binding Policy Directive for Programs of Instruction including the Credentials Framework and Program Standards or the degree level standards as required by the Post-secondary Education Quality Assessment Board. 4.5. Appropriate learning experiences, desired graduate skill sets and quality assurance procedures will be used to develop the framework for the new program. 4.6. All Durham College stakeholders will proceed with full implementation of the processes that will ensure the successful launch of a new program upon MTCU’s approval for program funding and/or program consent. 5. Procedure 5.1. Five-Year New Program Development Plan 5.1.1. The Vice-President, Academic (VPA) and Executive Deans/Deans will meet annually and will agree on potential new programs of instruction. The Five-Year New Program Development Plan is updated accordingly. The plan is a fluid document and is subject to change. 5.1.2. Ideas/concepts for new programs may come from many sources – external or internal; however, the idea must be supported by the Executive Dean/Dean in whose school the program will reside. 5.1.3. The Academic Leadership Team will critically review and then provide support for the five-year plan. 5.1.4. If the decision is made not to pursue a program that is on the plan, the program idea is moved from the active Five Year New Program Development Plan to the program idea repository. 5.1.5. New programs are developed in consultation with all relevant stakeholders. 5.2. Concept Paper 5.2.1. To initiate the development of a new program of instruction, a Concept Paper is developed by the Executive Dean/Dean or his or her representative. 5.2.2. The purpose of the Concept Paper is to provide clear context and rationale for the new program proposal, especially when the field under consideration is diverse and not well defined in scope. The Concept Paper includes a tentative program description, the knowledge and skills that graduates are expected to acquire, and the potential areas of employment. Where applicable, the credential for other similar Ontario Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology programs that may be used as a point of reference is included. The Concept Paper - New Program Development Proposal template is available within the New Program Development Guide posted on ICE. 5.2.3. The Concept Paper allows for the identification of particular distinguishing features, such as niche areas of expertise or program streams. 5.3. Environmental Scan 5.3.1. Once the Concept Paper has been developed the Office of Research Services, Innovation and Entrepreneurship (ORSIE) will prepare an environmental scan to identify the following, where available:
  • other colleges offering similar programs in the system, demand and the success of those programs; and
  • labour market trends, market position and competition, and employment opportunities for graduates of the new program.
5.3.2. The Centre for Professional and Part-time Learning, will conduct research to support their new program proposals. 5.3.3. The Executive Dean/Dean, in consultation with relevant stakeholders, will review the environmental scan and decide whether or not to continue with the program development. 5.4. Develop the Program of Studies and Vocational Learning Outcome 5.4.1. With the support from and/or in consultation with a curriculum specialist and the program faculty lead, the Executive Dean/Dean will:
  • Develop preliminary Program Vocational Learning Outcomes;
  • Develop a preliminary Program of Study including course sequence detailed semester by semester, program hours, and pre-requisites and co-requisites;
  • Develop preliminary course titles and course descriptions.
5.5. External Stakeholder Feedback 5.5.1. The Executive Dean/Dean will gather feedback from the proposed program stakeholders (Pre-Program Advisory Committee) including current faculty, employers, industry experts, and related accreditation and/or regulatory bodies. Stakeholders may also include students, and graduates from related programs. Stakeholders will provide input through focus group session(s) and/or survey questionnaire(s). Questions will focus on labour market trends, employer and industry expectations. 5.5.2. Stakeholders will be asked to propose a recommendation in support of the development and offering of the new program. 5.5.3. The Executive Dean/Dean will coordinate the collection of stakeholder feedback by providing names and contact details, and sending invitations to participate of the focus group or survey. The Executive Dean/Dean will also coordinate all logistics for the external feedback session, including securing the meeting room and catering requirements. 5.5.4. In consultation with the Executive Dean/Dean, the Manager, Program Development and Quality Assurance will prepare the focus group/survey questionnaire and program information package, and secure a note-taker for the in-person session. 5.5.5. A sample invitation and questionnaire is available within the New Program Development Guide posted on ICE. 5.6. New Program Development Document 5.6.1. The Executive Dean/Dean, and Manager, Program Development and Quality Assurance will complete the New Program Development Document template in preparation for the Program Proposal Review Committee (PPRC) meeting. 5.6.2. The New Program Development Document is available within the New Program Development Guide posted on ICE. 5.7. Budget Development 5.7.1. The Executive Dean/Dean and Manager, Program Development and Quality Assurance will meet with the Manager, Planning and Reporting to develop a preliminary program budget using the approved template. This budget will forecast the proposed program’s financial contribution over a five-year period and could include:
  • Faculty and support staff resources
  • Projected enrolment (years 1-5)
  • Space and renovations requirements
  • Capital: Equipment
  • IT-related expenses
  • Curriculum development
  • Library allocations
5.7.2. The projected budget is approved by the Chief Financial Officer (CFO) and Durham College Leadership Team (DCLT) who will implement or assist in the implementation of the budget items identified in 5.7.1. There are times when a budget forecast will not meet traditional College standards or benchmarks in one or more of the above areas and cannot be approved by the CFO. In some or all of those cases, the VPA will bring the program budget forward to the DCLT to consider approving the projected budget where there are circumstances beyond the normal approval threshold. 5.8. Finalize the Program of Study and Mapping Vocational Learning Outcomes 5.8.1. Based on the feedback provided by the stakeholders and with the support from and/or in consultation with a curriculum specialist and the program faculty lead, the Executive Dean/Dean will: 5.9. Program Proposal Review Committee (PPRC) 5.9.1. The Executive Dean/Dean will present the New Program Proposal Document to the PPRC. 5.9.2. PPRC will propose a recommendation regarding the development of the new program proposal to the VPA. 5.9.3. The VPA will make a final decision of whether or not to proceed with seeking Board of Governor approval for the proposed new program.
  • Finalize and approve the Program Vocational Learning Outcomes;
  • Finalize and approve the Program of Study including course sequence detailed semester by semester, program hours, and pre-requisites and co-requisites;
  • Finalize and approve course titles and course descriptions.
For Ontario College Certificate, Diploma, Advanced Diploma and Graduate Certificate programs, please follow the following steps: 5.10. Credential Validation Services 5.10.1. Credentials validation from the Ontario College Quality Assurance Service (OCQAS) is required in order to be approved for ministry funding. Executive Deans/Deans will: 5.10.2. Complete a Credentials Validation Services (CVS) application form which includes program details and a minimum map of courses to the Vocational Learning Outcomes and Essential Employability Skills. 5.10.3. The CVS form is sent to the Manager, Program Development and Quality Assurance who will review and submit CVS application form to OCQAS for approval. 5.11. Board of Governors approval 5.11.1. Upon receiving VPA approval for the proposed new program and CVS approval and validation by OCQAS, the manager, Program Development and Quality Assurance will prepare the New Program of Instruction Board Report and Program Summary document template available on ICE. 5.11.2. The Board Report and Program Summary document are approved by the VPA and College President. 5.11.3. The VPA and the Executive Dean/Dean will seek a motion from the Board of Governors to approve the new program. 5.12. MTCU Approval for Funding 5.12.1. Upon Board of Governors approval of the new program, the Manager, Program Development and Quality Assurance will complete the Ministry’s funding application and submit it to the College President for signature. 5.12.2. The signed application is uploaded to the Program Approvals, Colleges Unit of MTCU using the electronic portal, College Program Funding Approval and Administration Module (College-PFAAM). 5.12.3. The Manager, Program Development and Quality Assurance will vet and prepare responses to MTCU inquiries in consultation with the Executive Dean/Dean. 5.12.4. Upon receiving program funding approval by MTCU, the Manager, Program Development and Quality Assurance will prepare and send a memo via email advising the college stakeholders. For Bachelor’s degree programs, please follow the following steps: 5.13. Board of Governor Approval 5.13.1. Upon receiving VPA approval for the proposed new program the Manager, Program Development and Quality Assurance prepares New Program of Instruction Board Report and program summary document. 5.13.2. The Board Report and program summary document are approved VPA and College President. 5.13.3. The VPA and the Executive Dean/Dean will seek a motion from the Board of Governors to approve the new Bachelor’s degree program. 5.14. Ministerial Consent Application 5.14.1. Upon receiving approval from the Board of Governors, Durham College will apply for Ministerial Consent to offer the proposed degree program pursuant to the Post-secondary Education Choice and Excellence Act, 2000. 5.14.2. The Executive Dean/Dean, faculty expert/team, and Manager, Program Development and Quality Assurance will be responsible for the full bachelor program preparation and submission as outlined in the Post-secondary Education Quality Assurance Board (PEQAB) Submission Guidelines, and Handbook for Ontario Colleges. 5.14.3. Upon receiving program funding approval by MTCU, the Manager, Program Development and Quality Assurance will prepare and send a memo via email advising the college stakeholders. 5.15. College-Wide Implementation of All New Programs 5.15.1. Upon receiving the memo regarding a new program funding approval and/or ministerial consent from MTCU, all Durham College stakeholders will proceed with full implementation of the processes that will ensure the successful launch of a new program. 6. Roles and responsibilities 6.1. Vice-President, Academic The Vice-President, Academic is responsible for: 6.1.1. Implementation of this policy and procedure and for overseeing Durham College’s quality assurance processes. 6.1.2. Approving the New Program Development Five-Year Plan. 6.1.3. Approving the new program based on the recommendation of the Program Proposal Review Committee. 6.1.4. Proposing a motion to the Board of Governors for program approval. 6.2. Executive Dean/Dean The Executive Dean/Dean is responsible for: 6.2.1. Preparing, planning and development of the Five-Year New Program Development Plan for their school. 6.2.2. Critically reviewing and approving the Five-Year New Program Development Plan. 6.2.3. Completing the New Program Proposal Document in concert with the Manager, Program Development and Quality Assurance. 6.2.4. Coordinating stakeholder feedback by providing names and contact details, sending invitations to participants of the focus group or survey. 6.2.5. Coordinating all logistics for the external feedback session, including securing the meeting room and catering requirements. 6.2.6. Presenting the new proposal to the Program Proposal Review Committee. 6.2.7. Presenting the new program proposal to the Board of Governors. 6.2.8. Preparing the content for the web page, program card and other promotional and marketing material in collaboration with Communications and Marketing department. 6.3. Manager, Program Development and Quality Assurance The Manager, Program Development and Quality Assurance is responsible for: 6.3.1. Participating and advising during the development of the Five-Year New Program Development Plan. 6.3.2. Ensuring that the new program meets all requirements for internal and external program development and approval processes. 6.3.3. Leading and coordinating the proposal submission to MTCU for bachelor programs. 6.3.4. Sending a memo to the college community regarding new program funding approvals. 6.4. Manager, Institutional Research and Planning The Manager, Institutional Research and Planning is responsible for: 6.4.1. Participating and advising during the development of the Five-Year New Program Development Plan. 6.4.2. Developing the environmental scan. 6.5. Program Proposal Review Committee The Program Proposal Review Committee is responsible for: 6.5.1. Providing a recommendation to the VPA regarding whether or not to proceed with the development and approval of the new program proposal. 6.6. Manager, Planning and Reporting The Manager, Planning and Reporting is responsible for: 6.6.1. Developing the five-year budget projections in collaboration with the Executive Dean/Dean and Manager, Program Development and Quality Assurance. 6.6.2. Seeking approval from the Chief Financial Officer for the proposed budget projections including capital requirements. 6.7. Chief Financial Officer The Chief Financial Officer is responsible for: 6.7.1. Approving the five-year budget projection including capital requirements. 6.8. Manager, Curriculum Development The Manager, curriculum development is responsible for: 6.8.1. Providing support and guidance in the revision and/or development of Program of Study, Vocational Learning Outcomes, CVS Mapping, and course description. 6.9. Program Team/Subject Matter Expert(s) The program team/subject matter experts are responsible for: 6.9.1. Developing the curriculum. 7. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act considerations Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards have been considered in the development of this policy and procedure and it adheres to the principles outlined in the College’s commitment to accessibility as demonstrated by the Accessibility Plan (ADMIN-203). 8. Non-compliance implications Non-compliance with this policy, and/or any timelines associated with compliance, may result in financial implications and/or potentially cause damage to the college’s reputation. 9. Communications plan
  • A message will be posted on ICE alerting employees when new or revised policies and procedures are added to ICE.
  • A message will be posted on MyCampus alerting students when new or revised policies and procedures are added.
10. Related forms, legislation or external resources
  • Credentials Framework
  • Minister’s Binding Policy Directive Framework for Programs of Instruction
  • Ministry Program Standards or Ministry Program Descriptions
  • Ontario College Quality Assurance Service - College Quality Assurance Audit Process Standards and Requirements
  • Ontario Qualifications Framework
  • Post-secondary Education Quality Assessment Board Handbook for Ontario Colleges
VIEW POLICY [PDF]

Perquisites

ADMIN-233

Introduction

This policy was developed in compliance with the Broader Public Sector (BPS) Perquisites Directive.

1. Introduction This policy was developed in compliance with the Broader Public Sector (BPS) Perquisites Directive. 2. Purpose The purpose of this policy is to establish rules on perquisites where these are provided through public funds. The rules apply to any person in a designated BPS organization, including the following:
  • Appointees;
  • Board members;
  • Elected officials; and
Employees. 3. Definitions Refer to Durham College’s Standard Definitions. 4. Policy statements 4.1. The following perquisites are not allowed under any circumstance:
  • Club memberships for personal recreation or socializing purposes, such as fitness, golf, or social clubs;
  • Seasons tickets to cultural or sporting events;
  • Clothing allowances not related to health and safety or special job requirements;
  • Access to private health clinics (medical services outside those provided by the provincial health-care system or by the employer’s group insured benefit plans); and
Professional advisory services for personal matters, such as tax or estate planning. 4.2. A perquisite is allowable only in limited and exceptional circumstances where it is demonstrated to be a business-related requirement for the effective performance of an individual’s job. 4.3. All allowable perquisites involving the President, must be approved by the Board of Governors and by the President for perquisites involving management. 4.4. A statistical summary report on perquisites shall be generated on an annual basis. Such a summary information report regarding allowable perquisites, will be made publicly available upon request. Personal information shall not be provided. 5. Procedure This section is not applicable. 6. Roles and responsibilities 6.1. It is the responsibility of the Chief Administrative Officer to ensure this policy is fully implemented. 7. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act considerations Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards have been considered in the development of this policy and procedure and it adheres to the principles outlined in the College’s commitment to accessibility as demonstrated by the Accessibility Plan (ADMIN-203). 8. Non-compliance implications Failure to comply with this policy could result in disciplinary action for individuals found submitting or approving fraudulent expenditures, or financial loss, reputational damage and/or legal sanctions against the College. 9. Communications plan
  • A message will be posted on ICE alerting employees when new or revised policies and procedures are added to ICE.
  • A message will be posted on MyCampus alerting students when new or revised policies and procedures are added.
10. Related forms, legislation or external resources
  • Broader Public Sector Perquisites Directive
View policy [PDF]

Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition

ADMIN-251

Introduction

Durham College acknowledges the value of skills and knowledge attained through prior work, volunteer, life and/or academic experiences and encourages students to apply for academic credit for this experience through the prior learning assessment process.

1. Introduction Durham College acknowledges the value of skills and knowledge attained through prior work, volunteer, life and/or academic experiences and encourages students to apply for academic credit for this experience through the prior learning assessment process. 2. Purpose This policy and procedure provides the criteria for demonstrating, evaluating and acknowledging prior student learning and/or experience that may be deemed equivalent to current Durham College course requirements. 3. Definitions Refer to Durham College’s Standard Definitions. 4. Policy statements 4.1. Whenever possible, maximum recognition of prior learning will be given. 4.2. A student shall not initiate the Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR) process if they:
  • Were registered in, or audited the course in the previous ten (10) months;
  • Failed the course within the previous two (2) academic years; or
Has misrepresented their performance in a College course for the purpose of obtaining marks or recognition. 4.3. For all post-secondary credentials, no more than 75 per cent of a program of study can be obtained through PLAR processes . 4.4. It is recommended that applications for PLAR be completed prior to course commencement. In any case, students enrolled in the course must apply and make payment for the PLAR process within ten business days of course commencement. 4.5. In the event that a student is enrolled in the course they are seeking credit for before applying for PLAR, all applicable withdrawal deadlines will apply. 4.6. Timelines for completing PLAR processes shall be prescribed but vary based on factors including, but not limited to, availability of faculty subject experts and/or access to appropriate testing facilities. 4.7. Fees for processing PLAR applications will be levied. 4.8. To apply for PLAR consideration, students must have a secondary school diploma or equivalent, or meet mature student status. 4.9. Not all courses are eligible for PLAR consideration. It is the candidate’s responsibility to review the course outline for the current academic year to confirm course eligibility for the PLAR process. 4.10. Students are granted only one opportunity to PLAR a course. 4.11. Credit for courses earned through the PLAR process does not automatically provide direct entry into a program of study. PLAR candidates must still meet all admission requirements for a program. 4.12. PLAR assessment methods shall be determined by the appropriate subject matter expert from the applicable program area. 4.13. Credits gained through PLAR will be assigned a grade and are transcribed in the same manner as credits earned through coursework at the College. Numeric grades assigned from successful PLAR assessments impact a student’s grade point average. 4.14. Decisions regarding PLAR may be appealed. 4.15. The penalties for academic dishonesty also apply to PLAR assessments. Specific details can be found in the Academic Integrity policy and procedure (ACAD-101). 5. Procedure The timelines listed may vary based on factors including, but not limited to, availability of faculty subject experts and/or access to appropriate testing facilities. 5.1. Applications for Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition Applications for PLAR should be completed prior to course commencement; however, they shall be accepted up to 10 business days of course commencement. Application forms for PLAR are available in the Strategic Enrolment Services office, school offices, and can be downloaded from the Durham College website, www.durhamcollege.ca/plar. Courses with the mass challenge option must have a minimum enrolment of 10 post-secondary students by published deadlines. A student will initiate the PLAR process by registering and making fee payment through Strategic Enrolment Services. Once a PLAR candidate has registered, they have committed to completing the process; failure to do so shall be recorded in the student information system. 5.2. Evaluation Process 5.2.1. Upon receipt of a PLAR registration form, the College has up to 20 business days to develop an assessment process. 5.2.2. In order to demonstrate that they possess the knowledge required to meet the learning outcomes of a course, a PLAR candidate shall be evaluated using one or more assessment methods including, but not limited to:
  • Comprehensive written examination;
  • Free response assignment;
  • Performance test;
  • Observation/demonstration;
  • Portfolio;
  • Product assessment; and
Oral (interview/presentation). 5.2.3. The PLAR Office (in Strategic Enrolment Services) shall co-ordinate the provision and return of assessment materials between the faculty and the PLAR candidate. The PLAR candidate shall have a prescribed number of business days, not to exceed 30 business days, from the date of written notification by the PLAR Office that the assessment package is prepared, to complete requirements. 5.2.4. Upon receipt, the faculty member evaluating the PLAR submission has up to 10 business days to grade the assessment(s) and return the package to the PLAR Coordinator. 5.3. Outcome The PLAR Coordinator shall notify a PLAR candidate within five (5) business days of receiving the graded assessment. Passing grades obtained through the PLAR process shall appear on the student’s academic record, and are calculated as part of a student's grade point average. Unsuccessful PLAR submissions will not be recorded on the student’s academic record, however, they will be recorded in the comments section of the student information system for reference as the student will not be permitted to PLAR the same course a second time. Credits earned through the PLAR process do not automatically provide direct entry into a program of study. PLAR candidates must still meet all entry requirements for a program. 5.4. Appeal Students may appeal the PLAR decision. The appeal process will follow the Grade Appeal policy and procedure (ACAD-111). 6. Roles and responsibilities 6.1. It is the responsibility of the Executive Director, Strategic Enrolment Services in collaboration with the Vice-President, Academic, to ensure this policy and procedure is fully implemented. 6.2. It is the responsibility of Strategic Enrolment Services, in collaboration with the Vice-President, Academic and the academic schools to facilitate the processing, assessment, and granting of credits for students seeking recognition for prior work, volunteer, life and/or academic experiences. 6.3. It is the responsibility of the student to apply for PLAR within established timelines. 6.4. It is the responsibility of the professor, Program Coordinator, and Executive Dean or designate from the appropriate academic school to establish the criteria/documentation required, review the submitted material for, and render a decision within the established timelines. 6.5. It is the responsibility of the PLAR Coordinator (in Strategic Enrolment Services) to record the final assessment result in the student information system and to communicate the results to the student. 7. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act considerations Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards have been considered in the development of this policy and procedure and it adheres to the principles outlined in the College’s commitment to accessibility as demonstrated by the Accessibility Plan (ADMIN-203). 8. Non-compliance implications Failure to comply with this policy and procedure puts the College in conflict with the Minister’s directive and at risk of actions by the government. 9. Communications plan
  • A message will be posted on ICE alerting employees when new or revised policies and procedures are added to ICE.
  • A message will be posted on MyCampus alerting students when new or revised policies and procedures are added.
10. Related forms, legislation or external resources
  • Board of Governors Executive Limitations Policy: Programs of Instruction
  • Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities - Minister’s Binding Policy Directive on Frameworks for Programs of Instruction
View policy [PDF]

Program Change

ACAD-124

Introduction

From both a quality assurance and academic integrity perspective, it is important for Durham College to develop, and implement documented program change processes. This will ensure that changes to a program, both minor and major, are vetted and approved and that program learning outcomes, course learning outcomes and essential employability skills are still being met. Program changes may be necessary due to external factors, such as changing industry needs and/or expectations, regulatory and/or accrediting body standards or guidelines. Changes to programs of study affect many functional areas of the College, and may have significant impact on a student’s academic experience. This policy and procedure will provide guidance and instruction for implementing program changes in a structured and transparent manner.

1. Introduction From both a quality assurance and academic integrity perspective, it is important for Durham College to develop, and implement documented program change processes. This will ensure that changes to a program, both minor and major, are vetted and approved and that program learning outcomes, course learning outcomes and essential employability skills are still being met. Program changes may be necessary due to external factors, such as changing industry needs and/or expectations, regulatory and/or accrediting body standards or guidelines. Changes to programs of study affect many functional areas of the College, and may have significant impact on a student’s academic experience. This policy and procedure will provide guidance and instruction for implementing program changes in a structured and transparent manner. 2. Purpose It is understood that academic schools must review and revise course curricula and programs of study to ensure programs are current, relevant and meet students’ and employers’ expectations and needs. The purpose of this policy and procedure is to provide all relevant College departments with a formal set of guidelines for the implementation of both minor and major program changes. 3. Definitions Refer to Durham College’s Standard Definitions. 4. Policy statements 4.1. Minor and major changes to programs must be approved, as per the process detailed below, by June 15th or 15 months prior to the academic term that the changes are to come into effect. It is understood that there may be circumstances where changes will need to be implemented with a shorter time frame and these will be managed on an individual basis. 4.2. Minor and major changes to programs must first be approved by the academic Executive Dean/Associate Dean and then submitted to and approved by the Manager, Program Review and Renewal. 4.3. Major program changes must be presented by the academic Executive Dean/Associate Dean to the Program Proposal Review Committee (PPRC), approved by the Vice-President, Academic, and may require additional approval by the Durham College Board of Governors and/or re-submission to the Ontario College Quality Assurance Services Credential Validation Services (CVS) unit, and the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities (MTCU). 4.4. Once approved, a program change must be submitted to Strategic Enrolment Services. This will ensure:
  • Changes can be effectively communicated to all College stakeholders;
  • Individuals are aware of the program of study at the time of application; and
  • Printed material and information posted on the website is accurate;
4.5. In general, the program of study assigned to a student upon admission will be the one followed through to graduation. 4.6. Approved program changes will take effect beginning with the students entering into the first semester of the program. Existing curriculum versions will be followed by students in-stream. 5. Procedure 5.1. Minor program changes 5.1.1. The Executive Dean/Associate Dean will approve the minor change requests that may result from: 5.1.2. The Executive Dean/Associate Dean will approve and submit minor changes made to courses or a program of study using the Minor Program of Study Change Form to the Manager, Program Review and Renewal. 5.1.3. If supported, the Vice-President, Academic will sign the Minor Program of Study Change Form.
  • Faculty/program team recommendations;
  • Program Advisory Committee (PAC) meeting recommendations;
  • An annual or comprehensive program review;
  • Changes in accreditation standards/requirements; and/or
  • Updated/new MTCU Program Standards.
5.1.4. The Manager, Program Review and Renewal will advise the Executive Dean/Associate Dean and Program Proposal Review Committee (PPRC) members of the Vice-President, Academic’s decisions and recommendations. 5.1.5. The Manager, Program Review and Renewal will submit all approved Minor Program of Study Change forms to the Director, Reporting and Student Information Systems for updating to the student information system. Once all changes have been made, the director will notify and provide all related program change documents to the following internal departments in order to effect required changes and system updates:
  • School Office
  • Student Recruitment and Admission Services
  • Enrolment Services
  • Communications and Marketing
  • Financial Aid and Awards
  • IT Services
  • Facilities and Scheduling
  • Office of Research Services, Innovation and Entrepreneurship (ORSIE)
  • Centre for Academic and Faculty Enrichment (CAFE).
5.1.6. Minor changes to programs must be approved, as per the process detailed above, by June 15th or 15 months prior to the academic term that the changes are to come into effect. It is understood that there may be circumstances where changes will need to be implemented with a shorter time frame and these will be managed on an individual basis and will require approval by the Vice-President, Academic. 5.2. Major program changes 5.2.1. The Executive Dean/Associate Dean will consider major change requests that may result from:
  • Faculty/program team recommendations;
  • PAC meeting recommendations;
  • An annual or comprehensive program review;
  • Changes in accreditation standards/requirements; and/or
  • Updated/new MTCU Program Standards.
5.2.2. The Executive Dean/Associate Dean will initiate discussions with the Manager, Program Review and Renewal to establish a date to present the major change proposal to the Program Proposal Review Committee. 5.2.3. The Executive Dean/Associate Dean will complete the Major Program Change Request Form and include all supporting documentation as rationale for the change request and submit to the chair of the PPRC. 5.2.4. The PPRC will provide a recommendation to the Vice-President, Academic via the Manager, Program Review and Renewal. If approved, the Vice-President, Academic will determine if the changes need to be presented to the Board of Governors, Ontario College Quality Assurance Services Credential Validation Services (CVS) unit, and the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities. If so, the Manager, Program Review and Renewal will complete the required documentation as necessary. 5.2.5. In the event that the PPRC does not recommend approval to the Vice-President, Academic, the Executive Dean may choose to appeal the recommendations/decisions to the Vice-President, Academic. 5.2.6. The Manager, Program Review and Renewal will advise the Executive Dean/Associate Dean and PPRC members of the Vice-President, Academic’s decisions and recommendations (if applicable). 5.2.7. The Manager, Program Review and Renewal will advise Ontario College Quality Assurance Services and MTCU of major program changes as directed by the Vice-President, Academic. 5.2.8. Major changes to programs must be approved, by June 15th or 15 months prior to the academic term that the changes are to come into effect. It is understood that there may be circumstances where changes will need to be implemented with a shorter time frame and these will be managed on an individual basis and will require approval by the Vice-President, Academic. Supporting documentation can include:
  • Revised Program of Study (POS) using the Minor Program of Study Change Form;
  • PAC minutes/recommendations; and/or
  • Course descriptions.
6. Roles and responsibilities 6.1. It is the responsibility of the Vice-President, Academic to ensure this policy and procedure is fully implemented. 6.2. It is the responsibility of Strategic Enrolment Services to ensure compliance with the appropriate Minister’s Binding Policy Directives. 6.3. It is the responsibility of each departmental lead to ensure the directives outlined in this policy and procedure are fully implemented. It is also their responsibility to ensure that internal processes are operationalized. 6.4. It is the responsibility of the Executive Dean to communicate any changes, in consultation with Communications and Marketing and the Office of Strategic Enrolment Service to students and employees. 7. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act considerations Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards have been considered in the development of this policy and procedure and it adheres to the principles outlined in the College’s commitment to accessibility as demonstrated by the Accessibility Plan (ADMIN-203). 8. Non-compliance implications Non-compliance with this policy, and/or any timelines associated with compliance, may result in financial implications and/or potentially cause damage to the College’s reputation. 9. Communications plan
  • A message will be posted on ICE alerting employees when new or revised policies and procedures are added to ICE.
  • A message will be posted on MyCampus alerting students when new or revised policies and procedures are added.
10. Related forms, legislation or external resources
  • Minister’s Binding Policy Directives
View policy [PDF]

Program Learning Outcomes

ACAD-120

Introduction

1.1. All post-secondary certificate, diploma, advanced diploma, and graduate certificate programs of instruction at Ontario colleges of applied arts and technology are mandated to adhere to the Framework for Programs of Instruction as set out in the Minister’s Binding Policy Directive from the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities (MTCU). This directive requires the inclusion of program learning outcomes (PLOs), essential employability skills (EES) outcomes and general education requirements. All degree programs of instruction at Ontario colleges of applied arts and technology are mandated to adhere to the requirements outlined in the Postsecondary Education Quality Assessment Board (PEQAB), Manual for Ontario Colleges. 1.2. The quality and consistency of our post-secondary programs is dependent on this defined set of PLOs. 1.3. It is imperative that our PLOs are up to date, performance-based, relevant, appropriate for the credential, and are consistent with the MTCU program standard or program description. It is also essential to record them, centrally store them, track their change history, and effectively communicate them to students.

1. Introduction 1.1. All post-secondary certificate, diploma, advanced diploma, and graduate certificate programs of instruction at Ontario colleges of applied arts and technology are mandated to adhere to the Framework for Programs of Instruction as set out in the Minister’s Binding Policy Directive from the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities (MTCU). This directive requires the inclusion of program learning outcomes (PLOs), essential employability skills (EES) outcomes and general education requirements. All degree programs of instruction at Ontario colleges of applied arts and technology are mandated to adhere to the requirements outlined in the Postsecondary Education Quality Assessment Board (PEQAB), Manual for Ontario Colleges. 1.2. The quality and consistency of our post-secondary programs is dependent on this defined set of PLOs. 1.3. It is imperative that our PLOs are up to date, performance-based, relevant, appropriate for the credential, and are consistent with the MTCU program standard or program description. It is also essential to record them, centrally store them, track their change history, and effectively communicate them to students. 2. Purpose This policy and procedure outline the expectations regarding PLOs for all post-secondary programs at Durham College with respect to their applicability, accuracy, currency, maintenance, and adherence to MTCU standards and PEQAB degree level standards. It also describes the processes required for their maintenance, communication, and storage. 3. Definitions Refer to Durham College’s Standard Definitions. 4. Policy statements 4.1. All programs will be consistent with the College mission, the program’s intended purpose, and the credentials framework as defined in the MTCU Minister’s Binding Policy Directive: Framework for Programs of Instruction or the Post-secondary Education Quality Assessment Board (PEQAB), Manual for Ontario Colleges. 4.2. PLOs as defined by MTCU are the minimum standard for a program and can be augmented by locally determined outcomes. 4.3. Programs that do not have a formal program standard defined by the MTCU will have their PLOs guided by the program description provided by the MTCU, where they exist, at a level appropriate to the credential. 4.4. Academic deans ensure the development, maintenance, communications, and currency of PLOs. 4.5. Programs undergoing comprehensive program review (CPR) will undergo various curriculum review activities including curriculum mapping. Curriculum mapping will determine the compliance of the program with the MTCU program standard or program description. 4.6. PLOs are communicated to students using a variety of channels and with dialogue with the program faculty and academic staff. 4.7. PLOs can only be revised through a prescribed process with appropriate oversight. It is the executive dean or designate that identifies the authorized individual. PLOs are normally only revised as the result of a change in accreditation requirements, MTCU requirements or through the CPR process. 4.8. PLOs, their revisions and their revision history are centrally stored in a College repository. 5. Procedure 5.1. The executive dean or designate validates that PLOs reflect the MTCU program standards (where they exist). 5.2. The executive dean or designate ensures that program standards, newly developed or revised by MTCU are implemented by the program team within the designated timelines established by MTCU. 5.3. The executive dean or designate assigns the authority to revise the PLOs to a member of the program team or designate. 5.4. The executive dean or designate reviews and approves any PLO revisions provided by the authorized individual. 5.5. Every spring, program teams examine their PLOs during the annual program renewal (APR) process and reports the results to their executive dean. 5.6. Once a year, each program’s PLOs are presented to their PAC for validation. 5.7. The MTCU, PLOs represent the minimum expectations of the program and can be augmented to reflect outcomes specific to Durham College. If they are revised by the program team and the revision is approved by the dean, a table that cross-references the original PLOs with the new ones, will be generated and is sent to the Credential Verification Service (CVS) as a courtesy, and this documentation becomes part of the historical record of the program. 5.8. If there is no formal program standard for a program, the program team, in conjunction with advice from a curriculum and instructional consultant, will develop a set of PLOs that follows the MTCU program description (if one exists). This set of PLOs will be validated by the PAC. They will then be sent to the CVS as a courtesy and becomes part of the historical record of the program. 5.9. For programs undergoing CPR, the review lead will review the PLOs with a curriculum and instructional consultant prior to curriculum mapping. 5.10. The executive dean or designate will table revised PLOs for review by the Program Proposal Review Committee (PPRC). This does not apply to revised Program Standards. 5.11. Once approved, revised PLOs are communicated by the manager, academic quality assurance via a Program Change MEMO. 5.12. Changes to any PLOs are documented and this documentation becomes part of the historical record of the program. 6. Roles and responsibilities 6.1. It is the responsibility of the vice-president, Academic to ensure this policy and procedure is fully implemented. 6.2. It is the responsibility of the school executive dean or designate to assign authority and ensure the annual review of PLOs. They also approve any changes to PLOs and ensure that documentation is kept and maintained. 6.3. It is the responsibility of the program coordinator to coordinate the APR process used by the program team. 6.4. It is the responsibility of the program team to ensure their PLOs are relevant to the industry, are compliant with the MTCU program standards, and are taught and evaluated throughout the courses within their program. 6.5. It is the responsibility of the PAC to review any PLOs presented to them for currency and relevancy, and make recommendations to the program executive dean or designate. 6.6. It is the responsibility of a curriculum and instructional consultant to provide curriculum-related expertise to program teams as requested or required, such as course outline support, curriculum mapping and analysis support, course and PLO development and the development of authentic assessments aligned to course learning outcomes. The curriculum and instructional consultant may also include other faculty developers in these activities where appropriate. 6.7. It is the responsibility of the manager, Academic Quality Assurance to communicate revisions to PLOs to relevant stakeholders. 7. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act considerations Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards have been considered in the development of this policy and procedure and it adheres to the principles outlined in the College’s commitment to accessibility as demonstrated by the Accessibility Plan (ADMIN-203). 8. Non-compliance implications Non-compliance puts the College at risk of violating the policy directives of the MTCU. It can also result in out-of-date and poorly designed programs. 9. Communications plan
  • A message will be posted on ICE alerting employees when new or revised policies and procedures are added to ICE.
  • A message will be posted on MyCampus alerting students when new or revised policies and procedures are added.
10. Related forms, legislation or external resources
  • Minister’s Binding Policy Directive: Framework for Programs of Instruction
  • Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities Program Standards
  • Postsecondary Education Quality Assessment Board, Manual for Ontario Colleges.
View policy [PDF]

Program Quality Assurance Process

ACAD-121

Introduction

1.1. The Program Quality Assurance Process (PQAP) articulates Durham College’s commitment to continuously improving program quality and processes to support academic excellence and a successful student experience. 1.2. The quality of our post-secondary programs is dependent on a regular and comprehensive review process to ensure programs are relevant, appropriate for the credential, and are consistent with the MTCU program standard or program description, and when applicable, the degree-level standard. Quality is also dependent on the program being designed to scaffold a student’s growth of knowledge and skills to meet the program learning outcomes. In addition, the quality of the program will be dependent on the faculty, who are experts in their field using modern teaching and evaluation methodologies. 1.3. The PQAP policy and procedure applies to all Durham College post-secondary approved programs, regardless of the location of delivery, mode of delivery or source of funding. The policy and procedure addresses the requirements with respect to compliance with quality assurance processes and activities, and provides the authority to deal promptly when quality and/or alignment with MTCU program standards, Program Quality Assurance Process Audit (PQAPA) requirements, the Minister’s Binding Policy Directive: Framework for Programs of Instruction, Postsecondary Education Quality Assessment Board (PEQAB), Handbook for Ontario Colleges – degree-level standards, and/or industry, business or professional standards are brought into question.

1. Introduction 1.1. The Program Quality Assurance Process (PQAP) articulates Durham College’s commitment to continuously improving program quality and processes to support academic excellence and a successful student experience. 1.2. The quality of our post-secondary programs is dependent on a regular and comprehensive review process to ensure programs are relevant, appropriate for the credential, and are consistent with the MTCU program standard or program description, and when applicable, the degree-level standard. Quality is also dependent on the program being designed to scaffold a student’s growth of knowledge and skills to meet the program learning outcomes. In addition, the quality of the program will be dependent on the faculty, who are experts in their field using modern teaching and evaluation methodologies. 1.3. The PQAP policy and procedure applies to all Durham College post-secondary approved programs, regardless of the location of delivery, mode of delivery or source of funding. The policy and procedure addresses the requirements with respect to compliance with quality assurance processes and activities, and provides the authority to deal promptly when quality and/or alignment with MTCU program standards, Program Quality Assurance Process Audit (PQAPA) requirements, the Minister’s Binding Policy Directive: Framework for Programs of Instruction, Postsecondary Education Quality Assessment Board (PEQAB), Handbook for Ontario Colleges – degree-level standards, and/or industry, business or professional standards are brought into question. 2. Purpose 2.1. This policy and procedure informs the need to record and track any changes resulting from the program quality assurance process, and effectively communicate the changes to all stakeholders (e.g. students, program team members, program advisory committee members etc.). 2.2. The Vice-President, Academic and the Academic Leadership Team are committed to a consistent comprehensive approach to quality outcomes, and believe that quality is attainable through an organized PQAP that includes, but is not limited to, new program approval processes, minor and major program change procedures, curriculum development, annual program review, program health matrix analysis and formal program review and renewal activities. The PQAP is intended to identify areas of strength and areas requiring immediate attention and improvement with the goal of supporting academic excellence and a successful student experience. 3. Definitions Refer to Durham College’s Standard Definitions. 4. Policy statements 4.1. All programs will be consistent with the College mission, the program’s intended purpose, and the Credentials Framework as defined in the MTCU Minister’s Binding Policy Directive: Framework for Programs of Instruction or the Post-secondary Education Quality Assessment Board (PEQAB), Handbook for Ontario Colleges – degree-level standards. 4.2. Durham College’s PQAP includes, but is not limited to, New Program Approval Process, Program Change Process, Annual Program Review (APR), Program Health Matrix (PHM 2.0) and Comprehensive Program Review and Renewal. 4.3. Each academic Dean is accountable for overseeing the PQAP within his or her school. 4.4. Program learning outcomes and their revision history are centrally stored in an electronic College repository known as WebCOT. 4.5. Documentation that shows evidence of a program participating in the PQAP will be stored centrally on ICE (Info Centre for Employees) in the electronic program portfolio. 5. Procedure 5.1. The approval of new programs will comply with the requirements of Durham College’s New Program Development and Approval policy and procedure and Curriculum Development policy and procedure. 5.2. Post-secondary programs will be reviewed annually following the Durham College annual program review. 5.3. Programs will be provided with an analysis of quality and growth indicators through the Durham College Program Health Matrix Report. Program actions arising from the PHM 2.0 Report will be documented by the program team in the APR and follow-through on the actions will be monitored by the Associate Dean and Associate Vice-President, Academic. 5.4. All post-secondary programs funded by the General Operating Grant will be reviewed annually using the provincial KPI survey. Program teams will be provided an analysis of the KPI data in the form of a KPI Report Card (when applicable data is available, and meets the “privacy and confidentiality” thresholds.). Actions for improvement will be documented in the APR and follow-through monitored by the associate dean and associate Vice-President, Academic. 5.5. Post-secondary programs will undergo periodic comprehensive review, approximately every five (5) to seven (7) years, to ensure compliance with Durham College’s Post-Secondary Program Review and Renewal policy and procedure. 5.6. Major program changes will be reviewed by the Program Proposal Review Committee (PPRC) and approved by the Vice-President, Academic as per the Program Change policy and procedure. 5.7. Durham College will undergo an external review of the College processes used to ensure program quality every five (5) years in compliance with the College Quality Assurance Audit Process (CQAAP) for Ontario colleges. 6. Roles and responsibilities 6.1. It is responsibility of the Vice-President, Academic to ensure this policy and procedure is fully implemented and to oversee and ensure recommendations for improvement are addressed and documented by the Deans/Associate Deans, program teams and/or individual professors. 6.2. It is the responsibility of the school Executive Dean/Associate Dean to ensure compliance with the requirements of Durham College’s PQAP and continuous improvement of the quality of programs and processes offered under his or her leadership. 6.3. It is the responsibility of the curriculum staff in Durham College’s Centre for Academic and Faculty Enrichment to provide mentoring and facilitation to support program teams and individual professors in the implementation of Durham College’s PQAP and its various components. 6.4. It is the responsibility of the program team to actively participate in the assessment of and continuous improvement of their program and academic processes as outlined in the components of Durham College’s PQAP. 6.5. It is the responsibility of each faculty member to execute his or her professional responsibilities with respect to Durham College’s Faculty Skills and Abilities and the requirements of Durham College’s PQAP requirements. 6.6. It is the responsibility of the Manager, Program Development and Quality Assurance to ensure awareness of the New Program Development and Approval policy and procedure and co-leading the external CQAAP. 6.7. It is the responsibility of the Director, Institutional Research and Planning to provide statistical analysis related to new program proposals/approval, preparation of Program Health Matrix Reports, KPI reports, Retention reports and the development of program information packages presentation to support Durham College’s PQAP. 7. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act considerations Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards have been considered in the development of this policy and procedure and it adheres to the principles outlined in the College’s commitment to accessibility as demonstrated by the Accessibility Plan (ADMIN-203). 8. Non-compliance implications Non-compliance puts the College at risk of delivering outdated and poorly designed programs; poor graduate employment; poor student, graduate and employer satisfaction rates; loss of reputation; and a below-standard rating by PQAPA external reviewers. 9. Communications plan
  • A message will be posted on ICE alerting employees when new or revised policies and procedures are added to ICE.
  • A message will be posted on MyCampus alerting students when new or revised policies and procedures are added.
10. Related forms, legislation or external resources
  • Annual Program Review Guide
  • Minister’s Binding Policy Directive: Framework for Programs of Instruction
  • Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities Program Standards
  • Program Health Matrix Guide
  • Post-secondary Education Quality Assessment Board (PEQAB), Handbook for Ontario College
  • Ontario College Quality Assurance Services College Quality Assurance Audit Processes
View policy [PDF]

Program Suspension and Cancellation

ACAD-106

Introduction

Durham College provides innovative academic programs that advance its strategic priorities, and responds to industry and student needs. Regular program review identifies academic programs to be suspended or cancelled. This ensures that a consistently applied, comprehensive and evidence-based analysis of the program is undertaken.

1. Introduction Durham College provides innovative academic programs that advance its strategic priorities, and responds to industry and student needs. Regular program review identifies academic programs to be suspended or cancelled. This ensures that a consistently applied, comprehensive and evidence-based analysis of the program is undertaken. 2. Purpose This policy and procedure provides a framework for a comprehensive, strategic and evidence-based process for the suspension or cancellation of an academic program at Durham College. This policy and procedure will support the most effective allocation and deployment of human, space and financial resources in a manner that contributes to the future sustainability, relevance and success of the College and its students. 3. Definitions Refer to Durham College’s Standard Definitions. 4. Policy statements 4.1. Changes to programs may be necessary due to several factors, such as changing industry needs, revised program standards or as a product of curriculum mapping and program review and necessitate ongoing program assessment and resource redeployment. 4.2. Programs to be considered for suspension or cancellation will be assessed within the context of a program performance framework that addresses, but is not limited to student demand and impact; community needs; collective agreement provisions; new program development needs and opportunities; perceived or actual competition or redundancies with other college programs; educational pathways; employment trends and employer needs; availability of qualified faculty; space and resource implications; program cost and sustainability; program quality assurance; the College’s balance of programs and programs will be consistent with the College’s academic and strategic priorities. 4.3. The decision-making process for suspending or cancelling programs and/or program complement will be transparent, consultative and evidence-based. 4.4. The Board of Governors shall approve all permanent suspensions and through the College (for programs at or above the Ontario College Certificate level), must inform the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities (MTCU). 4.5. Despite any program suspensions and cancellations, Durham College is committed to students graduating from their programs. 4.6. The decision to suspend a program will be made with every effort to minimize impact on applicants and students. 5. Procedure At regular intervals in the application cycle, Strategic Enrolment Services (SES) will review applications for each program and will initiate a discussion with the vicepresident, Academic (VPA) about any programs at risk of not meeting budgeted enrolment targets. The nature of this conversation will be to determine if a program intake should be suspended, or if a program should be suspended indefinitely, or permanently suspended. 5.1. Suspended Program Intake A suspended intake occurs when it is decided not to offer a particular cohort intake due to low enrolment or other circumstances. An intake suspension can refer to delivery mode (i.e.: fast-track intake) or semester (i.e.: Winter intake). 5.1.1. The VPA discusses all programs deemed at risk with the appropriate executive dean/designate and determines whether to suspend an intake or to continue to monitor applications, 5.1.2. The VPA advises the executive director, SES of the decision(s) made. 5.1.3. If an intake is being suspended due to enrolment considerations, the executive director, SES notifies and updates the following internal departments in order to effect required changes and system updates:
  • school office
  • Student Recruitment and Admission Services
  • Enrolment Services
  • Communications and Marketing
  • Financial Aid and Awards
  • Finance
  • IT Services
  • Facilities
  • Scheduling
  • International Education
  • Office of Research Services, Innovation and Entrepreneurship (ORSIE)
  • Centre for Academic and Faculty Enrichment (CAFE)
5.1.4. SES advises applicants of the program intake suspension during the application cycle and discuss options for applying to another program. 5.2. Indefinite Program Suspension An indefinite program suspension is one where recruitment will cease, and no further students will be admitted for the foreseeable future, yet will remain ’active’ with MTCU. The program may be relaunched in the future, through the major change process. 5.2.1. The VPA discusses all programs deemed at risk with the appropriate executive dean/designate and determines whether to indefinitely suspend a program or to continue to monitor applications. 5.2.2. After consultation with the appropriate executive dean/designate, the VPA advises the following individuals that a program is to be indefinitely suspended:
  • executive director, SES;
  • dean, International Education;
  • manager, Academic Quality Assurance; and
  • Academic Leadership Team.
5.2.3. The manager, Academic Quality Assurance notifies the following internal departments in order to effect required changes and system updates:
  • School Office
  • Student Recruitment and Admission Services
  • Enrolment Services
  • Communications and Marketing
  • Financial Aid and Awards
  • Finance
  • IT Services
  • Facilities
  • Scheduling
  • International Education
  • Office of Research Services, Innovation and Entrepreneurship (ORSIE)
  • Library
  • Centre for Academic and Faculty Enrichment (CAFE)
5.2.4. SES advises applicants of the indefinite program suspension during the application cycle and discusses options for applying to another program. (Note: for Professional and Part-time Learning programs below the Ontario College Certificate level, applicants are advised by Professional and Part-time Learning.) 5.2.5. SES works with Communications and Marketing to update the program status on the college website and makes the update at ontariocolleges.ca. The program will also be removed from all recruitment materials as soon as possible. 5.3. Permanent Program Suspension A permanent program suspension is one where recruitment will cease, and no further students will be admitted. MTCU will be advised. If a program has been suspended (intake) for three consecutive application cycles, it will be considered for indefinite or permanent suspension. 5.3.1. The VPA discusses all programs deemed at risk with the appropriate Executive dean/designate and determines whether to permanently suspend a program. 5.3.2. The appropriate executive dean/designate considers program information from sources such as the enrolment history accumulated through the APR process, monitoring trends in the Program Health Matrix (PHM), recommendations from a Program Advisory Committee (PAC), and/or program accreditation.
  • The criteria for assessment and supporting relevant data is comprehensive in approach and will evaluate cost factors as well as the program’s value to students, the community at large and the college.
  • Consultation occurs with all relevant academic, administrative and support areas and, where applicable, with relevant external and accreditation bodies.
5.3.3. After consultation with the appropriate executive dean/designate, the VPA recommends any permanent program suspensions to the college president for consideration and decision. 5.3.4. The VPA advises the following when a program is to be permanently suspended:
  • executive director, SES;
  • dean, International Education;
  • manager, Academic Quality Assurance; and
  • Academic Leadership Team.
5.3.5. The VPA recommends to the Board of Governors that the program(s) be permanently suspended. 5.3.6. If the program being permanently suspended has a current cohort, then: a. Students registered in a suspended program are provided with the opportunity to complete the program of study within the normal time. b. The executive dean/designate prepares a timeline and plan for currently enrolled students to support the opportunity to complete the program. c. This plan is communicated to SES and related stakeholders. 5.3.7. Once the approval to permanently suspend a program is received, SES communicates the decision to:
  • All current applicants: part of this process is to develop, on a program-by-program basis, strategies for retaining these applicants by recommending other similar Durham College programs; and
  • All students currently enrolled in the program: students are advised to contact their school office to discuss a program completion plan. (Note: for Professional and Part-time Learning programs below the Ontario College Certificate level, applicants are advised by Professional and Part-time Learning.)
5.3.8. The manager, Academic Quality Assurance notifies the following internal departments in order to effect required changes and system updates:
  • school office
  • Student Recruitment and Admission Services
  • Enrolment Services
  • Communications and Marketing
  • Financial Aid and Awards
  • IT Services
  • Facilities
  • Scheduling
  • Finance
  • Library
  • International Education
  • Office of Research Services, Innovation and Entrepreneurship (ORSIE)
  • Centre for Academic and Faculty Enrichment (CAFE)
5.3.9. The manager, Program Review and Renewal informs the MTCU in writing of a final decision to suspend a ministry funded program of instruction at all campuses and all delivery modes. 5.4. Ministry Treatment of Dormant, Suspended or Cancelled Programs 5.4.1. In order keep program lists used for the audit of enrolment up-to-date, the MTCU will automatically cancel any program that has not been in operation for five years (program is either suspended or dormant). 5.4.2. Cancelled Programs requires re-approval by the MTCU in order to be re-instated (see New Program Development Policy and Procedure (ACAD-104). 5.4.3. The MTCU provides the VPA with the Durham College Dormant Program List on an annual basis. 5.4.4. The VPA provides the Dormant List to the manager, Academic Quality Assurance for immediate action. 5.4.5. The manager, Academic Quality Assurance and Executive dean/designate reviews the Dormant List and identifies programs that can be cancelled or must remain active. 5.4.6. The manager, Academic Quality Assurance provides the updated status of the Dormant List to the MTCU within 30 days. Failure to submit the updated status of the Dormant List may result in the automatic cancellation of active programs. 6. Roles and responsibilities 6.1. It is the responsibility of the executive director, SES, executive dean/designate, manager, Academic Quality Assurance and vice president, Academic to identify programs for review. 6.2. It is the responsibility of the vice president, Academic to ensure that the Program Suspension and Cancellation Policy and Procedure is fully implemented. 6.3. It is the responsibility of the Academic Leadership Team, and college president to suspend or cancel a program. 6.4. It is the responsibility of the vice president, Academic to forward the recommendation to permanently suspend a program to the college president and Board of Governors. 6.5. It is the responsibility of the Board of Governors to approve or deny the recommendation to permanently suspend a program. 6.6. It is the responsibility of the Office of Vice-President, Academic to inform the Ministry of a decision to permanently suspend a program. 6.7. It is the responsibility of the manager, Academic Quality Assurance and Executive dean/designate to identify and submit the updated Dormant Programs List to the MTCU within the required timelines. 6.8. It is the responsibility of SES to advise applicants of all decisions related to the change of a program status and to offer alternative programs to apply to. 6.9. It is the responsibility of SES to advise current students of all decisions related to the change of a program status and to direct them to their academic school office to discuss program completion plans. 6.10. It is the responsibility of the academic school offices to work with current students affected by a decision to the permanently suspend a program to develop program completion plans. 7. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act considerations Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards have been considered in the development of this policy and procedure and it adheres to the principles outlined in the College’s commitment to accessibility as demonstrated by the Accessibility Plan (ADMIN-203). 8. Non-compliance implications Failure to comply with this policy could affect the allocation and deployment of human, space and financial resources in a manner that negatively impacts the future sustainability, relevance and success of the College and its students. In addition, failure to comply may result in a loss of reputation of the College if it is seen as offering programs that no longer meet the needs of industry. Failure to comply with MTCU requests to confirm program status may result in the MTCU automatically cancelling active programs. Cancelled programs will not be reactivated. 9. Communications plan
  • A message will be posted on ICE alerting employees when new or revised policies and procedures are added to ICE.
  • A message will be posted on MyCampus alerting students when new or revised policies and procedures are added.
10. Related forms, legislation or external resources
  • Board of Governors’ Policies: Executive Limitations: Programs of Instruction
  • Minister’s Binding Policy Directive on Framework for Programs of Instruction
  • Minister’s Binding Policy Directive: Program Suspension and Cancellation Operating Procedure
  • New Program Development Policy and Procedure (ACAD-104)
VIEW POLICY [PDF]

Recording of Learning Activities

ACAD-128

Introduction

1.1 Durham College recognizes that there are personal, professional and academic reasons for permitting and facilitating the recording of learning activities by faculty and/or students. 1.2 Taking notes during learning activities can be an aid to learning comprehension and student retention of course content. As such, this forms part of the recognized and accepted practice of students. If a student cannot take notes during a learning activity due to a disability, then the College will provide accommodations that are supportive of the essential requirements of the course and program. 1.3 In accordance with the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) and the Ontario Human Rights Code, Durham College faculty and staff have a responsibility to provide accommodations to students with disabilities that are consistent with and supportive of the essential requirements of courses and programs. Access and Support Centre (ASC) staff determine accommodations based on appropriate documentation. In certain cases, the recording of learning activities is an appropriate accommodation to enable equal access to learning and can be an aid to learning comprehension and student retention of course content. It forms part of the recognized and accepted practice of students.

1. Introduction 1.1 Durham College recognizes that there are personal, professional and academic reasons for permitting and facilitating the recording of learning activities by faculty and/or students. 1.2 Taking notes during learning activities can be an aid to learning comprehension and student retention of course content. As such, this forms part of the recognized and accepted practice of students. If a student cannot take notes during a learning activity due to a disability, then the College will provide accommodations that are supportive of the essential requirements of the course and program. 1.3 In accordance with the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) and the Ontario Human Rights Code, Durham College faculty and staff have a responsibility to provide accommodations to students with disabilities that are consistent with and supportive of the essential requirements of courses and programs. Access and Support Centre (ASC) staff determine accommodations based on appropriate documentation. In certain cases, the recording of learning activities is an appropriate accommodation to enable equal access to learning and can be an aid to learning comprehension and student retention of course content. It forms part of the recognized and accepted practice of students. 2. Purpose The purpose of this policy and procedure is to create a framework for the Collegesanctioned collection, use, disclosure, retention and disposal of recordings of learning activities. 3. Definitions Refer to Durham College’s Standard Definitions. 4. Policy statements 4.1. Recording of learning activities is prohibited unless conducted in accordance with this policy and procedure. 4.2. Students with disabilities who require recordings of learning activities as a form of accommodation will provide appropriate medical and/or psychological documentation to the Access and Support Centre (ASC) that identifies a bona fide disability-related need for this type of accommodation. 4.3. Students with a disability-related need for recordings of learning activities and ASC will sign the Recording of Learning Activities Student Agreement – Accommodations form in advance of any recording being made. 4.4. Any student may request permission from a faculty member to record all or part of a learning activity, whether conducted inside or outside a classroom environment. Faculty will consider these requests on a case-by-case basis. 4.5. Students with no disability-related need for recording of learning activities will sign the Recording of Learning Activities Student Agreement – No Accommodations form in advance of any recording being made. 4.6. Faculty may choose to record learning activities for academic purposes and/or professional development. 4.7. All recordings of learning activities will be conducted in a manner that respects the privacy of others. Notice of a learning activity recording will be communicated in advance of the recording. 4.8. No individual will be recorded if they object. 4.9. Students permitted to record all or part of a learning activity must be present for the duration of the recording process and will provide all necessary equipment to facilitate the recording, including any microphones or voice amplification apparatus to be worn by faculty. 4.10. Recordings of learning activities are for the requestor’s academic use only. Recordings, in whole or in part, will not be shared, distributed, broadcast, published or uploaded to anyone, under any circumstances. 4.11. Recordings of learning activities at all times remain the property of Durham College. 4.12. Failure to adhere to the requirements in this policy and procedure may result in discipline according to the Durham College Student Conduct policy and procedure (ADMIN-248). 5. Procedure 5.1. Student Recordings for Accommodation: 5.1.1. Students with disabilities who require recordings of learning activities as a form of an accommodation will provide appropriate medical and/or psychological documentation to the Access and Support Centre (ASC) that identifies a bona fide disability-related need for this accommodation. 5.1.2. The ASC staff, upon verification of a disability-related need for recordings of learning activities, will document this requirement in an accommodation access plan. 5.1.3. Students may appeal a College accommodation decision using the procedure outlined in the Accommodations for Students with Disabilities policy and procedure (ADMIN-225). 5.1.4. Students will sign the Recording of Learning Activities Student Agreement – Accommodations form in advance of any recording being made. A copy of will be retained by ASC. 5.1.5. The accommodation access plan and the signed Recording of Learning Activities Student Agreement – Accommodations form will be shared with faculty. 5.1.6. If the faculty member has concerns with the recording of classroom activity, they will discuss these concerns with their Executive Dean/Dean. The Executive Dean/Dean will facilitate a meeting between ASC and the faculty to discuss 5.1.7. Faculty providing this accommodation will notify other students prior to the beginning of the recording through DC Connect and prior to the beginning of the recording process in class. No students will be recorded if they object. 5.1.8. Faculty may withdraw permission to record learning activities, in whole or in part, to promote the open exchange of personal information and/or to protect the privacy rights of others. If the faculty member elects to withdraw permission to record within the classroom environment, they will discuss with their Executive Dean/Dean. The Executive Dean/Dean will facilitate a meeting between ASC and the faculty to discuss the recording request. In these situations, faculty will provide students with an equivalent means of gathering course content. 5.1.9. Students with this accommodation must be present for the duration of the recording, and will provide all necessary equipment to facilitate the recording, including any microphones or voice amplification apparatus to be worn by faculty. 5.1.10. Faculty may request, at their discretion, and will be provided with a copy of any recording made by a student. 5.1.11. Recordings of learning activities at all times remain the property of Durham College and are for sanctioned personal academic use only. Recordings, in whole or in part, will not be shared, distributed, broadcast, published or uploaded to anyone, under any circumstances. 5.1.12. All recordings (and copies) of learning activities will be destroyed by the student who has made the recording as per their accommodation plan no later than 15 business days after that student’s grades have been released in the affected course(s). 5.1.13. Failure to adhere to this procedure may result in discipline according to the Durham College Student Conduct policy and procedure (ADMIN248). 5.2. Student Recordings for All Other Reasons: 5.2.1. Students may request permission from a faculty member to record all or part of a learning activity, whether conducted inside or outside a classroom 5.2.2. Student requests will be made in writing to the appropriate faculty member, at least six business days in advance of the learning activity to be recorded. Students will specify in their requests whether they are asking to record more than one 5.2.3. Students do not need to provide a rationale for their requests. 5.2.4. Faculty who receive requests to record learning activities will consult with the other students participating in the learning activity using DC Connect in advance of the recording, and provide them with an opportunity to express concerns or objections. 5.2.5. Should a faculty member approve a learning activity recording, they will respond in writing to the requesting student, noting any requirements or expectations for the recording. Faculty will ensure that notification of a recording of learning activity is posted to DC Connect and will also announce immediately prior to the beginning of the recording process. 5.2.6. Students receiving permission to record all or part of a learning activity will sign the Recording of Learning Activities Student Agreement – No Accommodation form in advance of any recording being made. A copy will be retained by the faculty member. 5.2.7. Students receiving permission to record all or part of a learning activity must be present for the duration of the recording, and will provide all of their own equipment to facilitate the recording, including any microphones or voice amplification apparatus to be worn by faculty. 5.2.8. Faculty may withdraw permission, at their discretion, permission for student recordings of learning activities at any time. 5.2.9. Faculty may request, at their discretion, a copy of an original recording of learning activities at any time. 5.2.10. Students denied permission to record learning activities will be notified in writing at least one business day before the requested recording date. Faculty do not need to provide a rationale for permitting or denying the recording of learning activities. Students may appeal the decision using the procedure outlined in the Grade Appeal policy and procedure (ACAD-111). 5.2.11. Recordings of learning activities at all times remain the property of Durham College and for the requestor’s academic use only. Recordings, in whole or in part, will not be shared, distributed, broadcast, published or uploaded to any one, under any circumstances. 5.2.12. All recordings (and copies) of learning activities will be destroyed by the student no later than 15 business days after that student’s release of grades in the affected course(s). 5.2.13. Failure to adhere to this procedure may result in discipline according to the Durham College Student Conduct policy and procedure (ADMIN248). 5.3. Faculty Recordings: 5.3.1. Faculty may choose to record learning activities for academic purposes and/or professional development. 5.3.2. Faculty notifications will be made in writing to the appropriate learning activity participants, at least six business days in advance of the learning activity to be recorded. Faculty will consult (using the class DC Connect) with other students participating in the learning activity and provide them with an opportunity to express concerns or objections. 5.3.3. Individual persons will not be recorded if they object and permission to record may be withdrawn at any time. 5.3.4. Faculty will ensure that the recording of learning activities is announced immediately prior to the beginning of the recording process. 6. Roles and responsibilities 6.1. The Vice-President, Academic and the Vice-President, Student Affairs are responsible for ensuring that the Recording of Learning Activities policy and procedure is fully implemented. 6.2. Faculty are responsible for dialoguing with students as appropriate to facilitate a request for recording of learning activities. 6.3. Students are responsible for knowing and understanding the policy and procedure and for proactively dialoguing with their faculty prior to any learning activity recording to ensure the recording is permitted and managed appropriately. 7. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act considerations Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards have been considered in the development of this policy and procedure and it adheres to the principles outlined in the College’s commitment to accessibility as demonstrated by the Accessibility Plan (ADMIN-203). 8. Non-compliance implications 8.1. Non-compliance with this policy may result in financial risk, legal costs and/or failure to achieve the College’s mission. 8.2. The Ontario government established an administrative monetary penalty framework under the AODA. 9. Communications plan
  • A message will be posted on ICE alerting employees when new or revised policies and procedures are added to ICE.
  • A message will be posted on MyCampus alerting students when new or revised policies and procedures are added.
10. Related forms, legislation or external resources None.
View policy [PDF]

Responsible Conduct of Research

ACAD-116

Introduction

1.1. Recognizing the benefits of research to both the College and the community at large, Durham College actively supports a positive research environment that encourages and facilitates research and scholarly activity. As an institution, Durham College places the greatest confidence in the commitment of its members of the College community who adhere to the highest standards of integrity. It involves careful supervision of research, including research conducted by students; competent use of methods; adherence to ethical standards of practice; and the refusal to engage in, or condone, breaches of research integrity. 1.2. To support this goal, a framework is provided for the responsible conduct of research, along with guidance and support for those who participate in research initiatives. The primary responsibility for adherence to ethical principles, scholarly and scientific rigour, intellectual honesty and accountability rests with the researchers. Specifying standards for research integrity and parameters for research-related activities is essential to preventing and/or addressing an allegation of a breach of policy or research misconduct. 1.3. Individuals in the Durham College community who engage in research accept the right and responsibility for ensuring the integrity of their research and scholarly work. The College established standards of scholarly conduct to communicate awareness of expectations of best research practices that are conducted under the College’s auspices. 1.4. All members of the College community play an important role in helping to ensure that the standards of research integrity are maintained and have an obligation to report any circumstances they believe to be a breach of policy or misconduct. Errors in research may vary from carelessness or incompetence to gross misconduct and dishonesty, depending on the degree of intent. It is important to note that procedures for addressing allegations are rooted in principles of fairness and natural justice.

1. Introduction 1.1. Recognizing the benefits of research to both the College and the community at large, Durham College actively supports a positive research environment that encourages and facilitates research and scholarly activity. As an institution, Durham College places the greatest confidence in the commitment of its members of the College community who adhere to the highest standards of integrity. It involves careful supervision of research, including research conducted by students; competent use of methods; adherence to ethical standards of practice; and the refusal to engage in, or condone, breaches of research integrity. 1.2. To support this goal, a framework is provided for the responsible conduct of research, along with guidance and support for those who participate in research initiatives. The primary responsibility for adherence to ethical principles, scholarly and scientific rigour, intellectual honesty and accountability rests with the researchers. Specifying standards for research integrity and parameters for research-related activities is essential to preventing and/or addressing an allegation of a breach of policy or research misconduct. 1.3. Individuals in the Durham College community who engage in research accept the right and responsibility for ensuring the integrity of their research and scholarly work. The College established standards of scholarly conduct to communicate awareness of expectations of best research practices that are conducted under the College’s auspices. 1.4. All members of the College community play an important role in helping to ensure that the standards of research integrity are maintained and have an obligation to report any circumstances they believe to be a breach of policy or misconduct. Errors in research may vary from carelessness or incompetence to gross misconduct and dishonesty, depending on the degree of intent. It is important to note that procedures for addressing allegations are rooted in principles of fairness and natural justice. 2. Purpose 2.1. In keeping with the Tri-Agency Framework: Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR Framework), this Responsible Conduct of Research Policy articulates Durham College’s commitment to promote and protect the quality, accuracy, and reliability of research and scholarly activity that creates opportunities for inquiry and enhances learning for students. This policy applies to all Durham College-sanctioned research, regardless of location, source of funds, or use of Durham College resources. It also promotes fairness and expectations in the conduct of research and provides the authority for procedures that address allegations of policy breaches and other acts of misconduct. 2.2. The purpose of this procedure is to provide a process for the reporting and thorough investigation of allegations of breaches to the Responsible Conduct of Research Policy consistent with the Tri-Agency definitions of a breach of policy. This could result in the resolution of misunderstandings involving no apparent violation but defines a process for confirming and dealing with infractions when they occur 3. Definitions Refer to Durham College’s Standard Definitions. 4. Policy statements 4.1. Durham College will create an open and positive environment of academic freedom that protects the right of the scholar to pursue the truth through research and teaching and upholds the independence of the higher education research community. 4.2. Durham College shall promote education on the importance of responsible conduct and provide a clear understanding of the high level of ethical standards required in research, teaching and other aspects of scholarship. 4.3. Durham College shall develop appropriate support mechanisms for personnel in order to ensure that research is conducted with intellectual competence, honesty and integrity. 4.4. All members of the Durham College community have an obligation to report to the central point of contact responsible for receiving confidential enquiries and allegations all circumstances that may constitute research misconduct or a breach of policy. 4.5. Durham College will respond promptly to and investigate all allegations of misconduct involving researchers, faculty, administrators, staff or students. Investigations shall be conducted impartially and adhere to the principles of procedural fairness. 4.6. Policy conflict: In the event of a discrepancy between the Tri-Agency (CIHR, NSERC and SSHRC) policies and this policy, the Tri-Agency policies shall take precedence. 5. Procedure 5.1. Procedures for responding to allegations If a person is uncertain whether a breach of policy has occurred, a confidential consultation to seek clarification on activities that constitute research misconduct may be requested with the dean, Office of Research Services, Innovation & Entrepreneurship (ORSIE). 5.2. Receipt of an allegation Allegations of scholarly misconduct may come from a variety of sources, but only if the source of the allegation is identified can it be properly evaluated. Therefore, the allegation must be in writing, signed by the complainant and forwarded to the vice-president, Academic with an exact copy sent to the Secretariat on Responsible Conduct of Research (SRCR) if Tri-Agency funding is involved within six months of the alleged misconduct. Normally, the VPA is sufficiently at arm’s length to have an impartial view and is free from conflicts of interest so should be the designated point of contact. Support will be provided for a legitimate allegation against acts of retribution while simultaneously protecting the scholarly reputation of the researcher from false allegations and litigation. Anonymous allegations will only be considered on a case-by-case basis, if accompanied by sufficient information to enable the assessment of the allegation and the credibility of the facts and evidence upon which the allegation of a breach or misconduct is based without the need for further information from the complainant. If the allegation is related to conduct that occurred at another institution, the VPA will contact their respective counterpart at the other institution and determine which is best placed to conduct the inquiry and investigation, if warranted. 5.3. Addressing the Allegation 5.3.1. The VPA or designate shall fully disclose, within 10 business days, the allegation to the researcher who is the subject of the allegation. The researcher will be given 10 business days to respond to the allegation and the evidence supporting the allegation. The information that comes forward will be kept confidential and the privacy of individuals protected as much as possible while allowing due process. 5.3.2. The VPA may accept an admission of a breach in policy or misconduct, provided that it is in writing and reflects the facts as revealed in the allegation. In such case, the VPA may immediately proceed to take appropriate action to respond to the allegation. 5.4. Initial Inquiry An impartial internal or external investigator will be designated by the VPA, depending on the type of expertise required, to conduct an initial inquiry whereby the facts related to the allegation are collected and independently reviewed. The investigator will meet with the complainant, respondent and others as required and review documents or materials. A report of the findings and possible recommendation shall be submitted within 30 calendar days to the VPA for action. Within 10 business days of receipt of the report, the VPA will notify the respondent whether the allegation will be dropped or forwarded to an Investigation Committee. 5.5. Notification to Funders 5.5.1. If the research is supported by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) or the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), (the Agencies), the relevant Agency or SRCR will be notified immediately, subject to any applicable laws, of any allegations that involve significant financial, health and safety, or other risks. An inquiry letter/report will be sent within two months of receipt of an allegation to the Secretariat on Responsible Conduct of Research (SRCR). 5.5.2. Funding agencies or sponsors will be notified as appropriate of the initiation of an investigation and stakeholders informed that further funds will not be released until the investigation is concluded. 5.6. Appointment of an Investigation Committee 5.6.1. The VPA may establish an ad hoc Investigation Committee within 30 calendar days of notification to the respondent to ensure the principles of fairness are upheld with the disposition of the allegation. It will be comprised of three members, nominated by the VPA with its composition informed by Academic Council. Committee members will have no conflicts of interest, whether real or apparent, with the research project under investigation and will be knowledgeable in research matters and possess the necessary expertise. At least one external member who has no affiliation with the College will be included. This committee will be chaired by a member of the committee. 5.6.2. The committee will act with discretion and meet as necessary with the respondent, who may choose to be accompanied by advisors, such as peers, Student Association, or union representatives, at any required meetings. The committee may meet with others, seek expert advice and review documents or materials as required. All interviews will be documented. All evidence will be stored securely with the Office of the VPA. The respondent may request access to all available information bearing on the case. As necessary, the format of the information may be altered from the original to maintain privacy of the provider. 5.6.3. The report of the committee will include the following elements:
  • A description of the allegation.
  • A list of committee members and rationale for their selection.
  • Methods, timelines and materials used in the investigation.
  • Researcher’s response to the allegation and any measures taken to rectify the breach.
  • Persons interviewed or who provided information in the matter being investigated.
  • Any other relevant details.
  • Findings of misconduct based on clear, cogent and convincing evidence of a breach of research integrity, decisions and recommendations.
5.6.4. The Investigation Committee shall submit its report to the VPA within three months of the initial notification to the respondent that a committee will be formed. 5.6.5. If funding has been received from the Agencies, then the report and any actions taken will be submitted to the SRCR within seven months of receipt of the allegation. These timelines may be extended in consultation with the SRCR and with periodic updates as agreed upon provided. 5.7. Determination of the Allegation 5.7.1. Upon receipt of the report, the VPA will advise the complainant and respondent that the allegation is unfounded and dismissed or alternately, that it has been substantiated as a breach of policy or misconduct. The intent of the researcher will be considered in determining the appropriate sanction, if any. The VPA has the authority and discretion to impose sanctions or take actions recommended by the committee or as deemed to be appropriate for the situation and severity of the offense. 5.7.2. Sanctions could include:
  • Issuing a letter of concern to the researcher;
  • Requesting the researcher correct the research record and provide proof of the correction;
  • Advising the researcher that the College will not support any applications for future research for a defined period or indefinitely;
  • Terminating remaining installments of the grant or award;
  • Restitution of funds within a defined time frame for all or part of the funds already paid; and/or
  • Any other recourse available by law.
5.7.3. The VPA will notify the complainant, the respondent, and other stakeholders of the decision in writing and provide a copy of the Investigation Committee’s report within 10 business days of receiving the report. 5.7.4. If the investigation was initiated internally within the College, and breach of policy or misconduct was found to have occurred in research funded by one or more of the Agencies, the College will provide the Agency with a copy of the report. 5.7.5. Where the findings show the allegation to be unfounded or unsubstantiated, the Investigation Committee will make recommendations for reasonable steps to address damage to the respondent’s reputation that was suffered by virtue of the allegation. 5.7.6. If an allegation of misconduct was made in good faith, then every effort will be made to protect the complainant from any recourse. If, however, the allegation was irresponsible or malicious, then the VPA may take disciplinary action. 5.8. Appeal The respondent or complainant of an allegation may appeal the decision of the VPA or sanction imposed in writing to the Durham College president within ten business days of the decision being communicated, stating the grounds for the appeal. The VPA will be informed of the appeal and the president will review the report and make a determination on an appeals mechanism for the case, considering the grounds, consistent with this policy. Upon completion of the appeal proceedings, the decision rendered will be final. 5.9. Accountability and Communication Information on allegations and confirmed findings of breaches of policy, including actions taken shall be posted annually on the DC website and publicized in the Office of Research Services, Innovation and Entrepreneurship annual report, subject to applicable laws, as a means to educate researchers on the types of actions, behaviours and activities that constitute misconduct. The total number of allegations received involving Agency funds, the number of confirmed breaches and the nature of those breaches, subject to applicable laws will be reported annually to the SRCR. 5.10. Retention of Record All documents and records involved in the investigation will be kept confidential for a minimum of seven (7) years in the Office of the VPA. 6. Roles and responsibilities 6.1. Role of the Researcher The researcher's commitment to the advancement of knowledge requires diligence to honest and thoughtful inquiry, rigorous analysis and accountability in accordance with research standards and best practices. The College expects all researchers to be familiar with its provisions and to conduct their research, scholarly and creative activities in accordance with these provisions. Researchers shall be personally responsible for the conduct of the research and shall be accountable for: 6.1.1. Academic Rigour and Research Integrity
  • Ensuring that all research is conducted to the highest possible ethical standard and with scholarly and academic integrity;
  • Providing complete and accurate information on funding applications and related documents;
  • Overseeing the design of research methodology and the processes for acquiring, recording, examining, interpreting and storing complete and accurate records of data;
  • Demonstrating good stewardship of resources by utilizing facilities, equipment, other resources and infrastructure efficiently and in cooperation with others;
  • Utilizing funds for the purpose for which they were given, in accordance with any agreements and account for expenditures in regular financial reports;
  • Providing collaborators, students, research assistants and others with all reasonable information necessary to prevent misconduct as defined in this policy;
  • Supervising and monitoring the work of students, research assistants, and others;
  • Holding respectful discussions with all members of the research team to contribute to the scholarly effort;
  • Abiding by Durham College’s policies for Intellectual Property and Conflict of Interest; and
  • Disclosing any incidents of research misconduct and proactively rectifying a breach of policy.
6.1.2. Contributors and Authorship
  • The principal criterion for authorship requires that the author(s) has made a substantial conceptual or material contribution. The concept of ‘honorary authorship’ is not acceptable;
  • To ensure the publication of accurate scholarly reports, the following two requirements must be met:
    • The active participation of each author in verifying and taking responsibility for the part of the manuscript that he or she has contributed; and
    • The designation of one author who is responsible for the validity of the entire manuscript.
  • Acknowledging, appropriately all those, and only those who have contributed to the research, including funders and sponsors;
  • Students will be given the appropriate recognition for authorship or collection of data in any publication;
  • Obtaining permission of the author before using new information, concepts and/or data;
  • Obtaining permission and providing acknowledgement for unpublished and published works, including theories and concepts, data, source material, methodologies, findings, graphs and images; and;
  • Using archival material in accordance with rules and regulations.
6.1.3. Collection and Retention of Data
  • Verifying the authenticity of all data or other factual information generated in the research;
  • Using data only for the purposes for which it was collected;
  • Storing data in such a manner as to protect confidentiality as required by College policy and any relevant legislation;
  • Providing unlimited access to data and findings of the research for all co-researchers;
  • Preserving research data as others in the research community may raise questions requiring reference to original data; and
  • Maintaining original data, records and complete documentation including methodologies and findings in a suitable, secure format and for a period of seven (7) years from the publication of the research findings.
Individuals who conduct research and scholarship activities will abide by the standards and expectations and will be accountable for the ethical and intellectual quality of their work. Incidents of honest error intrinsic to the research process, such as conflicting data, differences of opinion in the interpretation of data or differences in research design shall not be considered research misconduct. Research activities shall be conducted in a manner that considers community impact, and where possible, minimizes negative social and environmental consequences. 6.2. Role of the Vice-president, Academic 6.2.1 It is the responsibility of the VPA to ensure this policy is fully implemented and enforced. 6.2.2 The VPA is responsible for confidentially receiving and responding to all allegations of a breach of policy or research misconduct that are made responsibly and in good faith. 6.2.3 When an allegation of a policy breach is received, the VPA has the authority to:
  • Obtain information pertinent to any allegation of misconduct;
  • Require members of the College community to answer questions related to any allegation of misconduct;
  • Require a second authorized signature from an institutional representative on all expenses charged to the researchers grant accounts or other measures as appropriate; and/or
  • Suspend funding and/or adjourn a research project pending an investigation of research misconduct.
6.2.4 A copy of the allegation will be sent to the Secretariat on Responsible Conduct of Research (SRCR) if the research is supported by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) or the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC). 6.2.5 Based on the severity of the allegation and evidence submitted, the VPA may make any of the following determinations, in writing, to all relevant parties: a) Dismiss the allegation where insufficient evidence exists. b) Request additional information and/or consult with appropriate deans and/or the dean, ORSIE in strict confidence. c) Resolve the allegation through informal proceedings, after meeting with both parties (with or without a third party present) and render a decision in writing. d) Initiate an investigation within two weeks. e) Suspend the research activities to protect the administration of the College and the research funds involved. 6.3. Role of Office of Research Services, Innovation & Entrepreneurship (ORSIE) ORSIE is charged with building the research capacity of Durham College by developing research policies, fostering partnerships and providing tools and training opportunities to educate and increase awareness regarding responsible conduct of research. 7. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act considerations Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards have been considered in the development of this policy and procedure and it adheres to the principles outlined in the College’s commitment to accessibility as demonstrated by the Accessibility Plan (ADMIN-203). 8. Non-compliance implications Failure to comply with this policy may result in damage to internal and external relationships, financial loss, property damage, reputational harm, legal action and/or a diminished ability to achieve the mission of Durham College. As well, failure to comply with this policy may also affect the College’s status as an institution eligible to receive funding from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research 9. Communications plan
  • A message will be posted on ICE alerting employees when new or revised policies and procedures are added to ICE.
  • A message will be posted on MyCampus alerting students when new or revised policies and procedures are added.
10. Related forms, legislation or external resources
  • Tri-Agency Framework: Responsible Conduct of Research
  • Tri-Council Policy Statement on Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans, 2014
View policy [PDF]

Student Out of Province Travel

ACAD-126

Introduction

With the increase in internationalization across the post-secondary sector, there has been an increase in the number of students travelling outside the province of Ontario. Student travel outside the province of Ontario includes but is not limited to:

  • International development projects
  • International exchange
  • Work-integrated learning
  • Short term study abroad
  • International research
Ensuring students receive the essential information and support services to make informed cultural and social transitions and choices and that reasonable precautions are taken with respect to the health and safety of students involved in these activities is necessary.

1. Introduction With the increase in internationalization across the post-secondary sector, there has been an increase in the number of students travelling outside the province of Ontario. Student travel outside the province of Ontario includes but is not limited to:
  • International development projects
  • International exchange
  • Work-integrated learning
  • Short term study abroad
  • International research
Ensuring students receive the essential information and support services to make informed cultural and social transitions and choices and that reasonable precautions are taken with respect to the health and safety of students involved in these activities is necessary. 2. Purpose This policy and procedure was created to ensure reasonable precautions are taken with respect to the health, safety and well-being of Durham College students who travel out of the province of Ontario for College approved activities and that students involved in these activities receive the essential information and support services the College can offer, to make the necessary cultural, social and professional transitions and choices. 3. Definitions Refer to Durham College’s Standard Definitions. 4. Policy statements 4.1. The College will, as best as it can, prepare and assist students who engage in activities requiring student travel outside the province of Ontario. 4.2. Student travel must be approved by the College’s appropriate approval authority before it occurs. 4.3. All students travelling outside the province of Ontario for College approved Activities, must comply with all applicable steps and requirements as outlined in this policy and procedure. 4.4. Students are governed by College policies and procedures while travelling outside the province of Ontario. 4.5. The College will not approve student travel to countries or regions with a Global Affairs Canada (GAC) risk rating advising to avoid non-essential travel (Level 3) or to avoid all travel (Level 4), except in rare circumstances. An exception may be considered where it is critical for the travel activity to occur and risk mitigation strategies can be implemented effectively. 4.6. By the completion of the assumption of risk, waiver of claims, release of liability and indemnity agreement, the Student indicates that they are aware of the risks associated with the College approved travel, understands that by participating in the travel they are being exposed to these risks and that they accept the legal obligations and waive certain legal rights, including the right to initiate legal proceedings in the court of law, or otherwise. 4.7. This policy and procedure applies to all students travelling on Durham College approved activities outside the province of Ontario. 4.8. This policy and procedure does not apply to the activities organized by independent College organizations such as the Student Association and Student Clubs or activities organized by groups of students which do not meet the definition of a College approved activity. 4.9. Documentation required by this policy and procedure will be classified as STU32 and FIN52, according to the Durham College Information Management Policy and will be maintained according to this framework. 5. Procedure 5.1. Out of Province Travel Initiated by Students 5.1.1. A student who is interested in undertaking out of province travel related to the College, will express their interest to the appropriate Executive Dean/Dean/Director or designate to ascertain whether the travel can be considered a College approved activity. 5.1.2. The student will research the destination and communicate the relevant information to their Executive Dean/Dean/Director or designate. Information may include but is not limited to health, safety, transportation and living accommodations of the travel destination. 5.1.3. A minimum of four weeks prior to travel, the student will complete the following forms;
  • Request for Student Travel Outside Ontario. This form will be approved by the appropriate School’s Executive Dean/Dean/Director who will also determine if the out of province travel has any budget or program credit implications. Once completed the student will forward this form to the Office of Insurance and Risk Management.
  • The Traveler Information and Emergency Contact Form, including the travel itinerary. This form provides contact information which will be used/released by the College to appropriate parties, in the event of an emergency, as determined to be necessary by the College and in accordance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. Once completed the student will submit this form to the appropriate executive dean/dean/director or designate, a copy will be forwarded to the Office of Insurance and Risk Management.
  • The Assumption of Risk, Waiver of Claims, Release of Liability and Indemnity Agreement (Waiver). Once completed the student will forward this form to the Office of Insurance and Risk Management.
5.1.4. For travel outside Canada the student is required to review and the College will consider, the Global Affairs Canada (GAC) destination’s travel advisory, to assess whether or not the student should engage in College approved activities in these regions. 5.1.5. The College reserves the sole right to cancel or recall previously approved student travel. Such cancellation or recall will be done by the VPA in collaboration with the Dean of the International Office and the appropriate School. Students must comply with any such cancellation or recall. Failure to comply will result in the student being considered to be on personal travel and will no longer have access to College resources and assistance. The student will be solely responsible for any harm or associated costs incurred as a result of their failure to comply. This does not apply to students who are unable to comply due to reasons beyond their control. 5.1.6. Once travel is approved, the student signs up for a pre-departure orientation session.
  • For College approved travel outside North America, predeparture sessions will be organized by the appropriate executive dean/dean/director or designate in collaboration with the International Office.
  • For College approved travel within North America, pre-departure sessions will be organized by the appropriate School.
5.1.7. At least four weeks (4) prior to the intended time of travel, the student will complete and submit, all other applicable documentation, as guided by the appropriate Executive Dean/Dean/Director or designate. This could include but is not limited to the student Declaration of Understanding. 5.1.8. The student will make arrangements for adequate insurance coverage prior to travel. Students will be asked to provide proof of insurance coverage. 5.1.9. Registration of Canadians Abroad (ROCA) is a service for Canadian permanent residents, protected people and depending on the location of travel, also for Israeli and Jamaican citizens. Where applicable, the student should enroll with ROCA. The service is free of charge and allows the Government of Canada to notify registrants in case of an emergency abroad or a personal emergency at home. 5.1.10. The student will monitor advisories prior to and during their travel. Appropriate parties at the College will be notified by the student of any changes that may impact student travel plans. 5.1.11. Upon return, the student will attend a re-entry de-brief session.
  • For College approved travel within North America, re-entry debrief sessions will be organized by the appropriate School.
  • For College approved travel outside North America, re-entry debrief sessions will be organized by the relevant executive dean/dean/director or designate in collaboration with the International Office.
5.2. Out of Province Travel Initiated by the College 5.2.1. Before completing any paperwork, students should consult with their School to confirm eligibility for the out of province travel, as eligibility will differ across opportunities. 5.2.2. A minimum of four (4) weeks prior to travel, the student will complete the following forms;
  • Request for student Travel Outside Ontario. This form will be approved by the appropriate School’s Executive Dean/Dean/Director who will also determine if the out of province travel has any budget or program credit implications. Once completed the student will forward this form to the Office of Insurance and Risk Management.
  • The Traveler Information and Emergency Contact Form, including the travel itinerary. This form provides contact information which will be used/released by the College to appropriate parties, in the event of an emergency, as determined to be necessary by the College and in accordance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. Once completed the student will submit this form to the appropriate executive dean/dean/director or designate, a copy will be forwarded to the Office of Insurance and Risk Management.
  • The Assumption of Risk, Waiver of Claims, Release of Liability and Indemnity Agreement (Waiver). Once completed the student will forward this form to the Office of Insurance and Risk Management.
5.2.3. The College reserves the sole right to cancel or recall previously approved student travel. Such cancellation or recall will be done by the VPA in collaboration with the International Office and appropriate Schools. Students must comply with any such cancellation or recall. Failure to comply will result in the student being considered to be on personal travel and will no longer have access to College resources and assistance. The student will be solely responsible for any harm or associated costs incurred as a result of their failure to comply. This does not apply to students who are unable to comply due to reasons beyond their reasonable control. 5.2.4. Once travel is approved, the student signs up for a pre-departure orientation session.
  • For College approved travel outside North America, predeparture sessions will be organized by the appropriate Executive Dean/Dean/Director or designate in collaboration with the International Office.
  • For College approved travel within North America, pre-departure sessions will be organized by the appropriate School.
5.2.5. The student will prepare themselves in advance of the travel. Based on parameters established by the appropriate School, the student will research the destination and be aware of the risks involved in the planned travel. 5.2.6. The College will ensure there is adequate out of province health and medical insurance. 5.2.7. Registration of Canadians Abroad (ROCA) is a service for Canadian permanent residence, protected people and depending on the location of travel, also for Israeli and Jamaican citizens. Where applicable, the student should enroll with ROCA. The service is free of charge and allows the Government of Canada to notify registrants in case of an emergency abroad or a personal emergency at home. 5.2.8. The student will monitor advisories prior to and during their travel. Appropriate parties at the College will be notified by the student of any changes that may impact student travel plans. 5.2.9. Upon return, the student will attend a re-entry de-brief session.
  • For College approved travel within North America, re-entry debrief sessions will be organized by the appropriate School.
  • For College approved travel outside North America, re-entry debrief sessions will be organized by the relevant executive dean/dean/director or designate in collaboration with the International Office.
6. Roles and responsibilities 6.1. It is the responsibility of the Vice-President, Academic in collaboration with the Dean of the International Office, the Office of Insurance and Risk Management and the Executive Dean/Dean/Director to ensure this policy and procedure is fully implemented. 6.2. It is the responsibility of the International Office to schedule and host mandatory pre-departure and re-entry debrief sessions for College approved travel outside of North America. 6.3. It is the responsibility of the School to schedule and host mandatory pre-departure and re-entry debrief sessions for College approved travel within North America. 6.4. It is the responsibility of the appropriate School, the Office of Insurance and Risk Management and the International Office to ensure students are aware of the relevant requirements for out of province travel. 6.5. It is the responsibility of the student to:
  • complete and submit all required forms with the appropriate supporting documents, for travel;
  • consider the risks associated with travel and to take the necessary precautions to avoid, mitigate and manage these risks;
  • research the destination;
  • understand and comply with Durham College’s Student Conduct policy and procedure and the destination country’s laws while away;
  • act safely and in a responsible manner, exercising good judgement at all times to prevent harm to oneself or others while away;
  • obtain travel documents (such as visas, passports and immunization records), obtain appropriate vaccinations, medical advice and any required supplementary insurance;
  • stay informed of changing conditions by monitoring Global Affairs Canada and other advisories;
  • inform their Durham College contact of any changes that may affect their original risk management and mitigation strategy, including but not limited to a change in address, while abroad and
  • communicate with the International Office and the School, where applicable, regarding scheduling and attending mandatory pre-departure and re-entry debrief sessions.
7. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act considerations Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards have been considered in the development of this policy and procedure and it adheres to the principles outlined in the College’s commitment to accessibility as demonstrated by the Accessibility Plan (ADMIN-203). 8. Non-compliance implications Failure to comply with this policy could adversely affect the health, safety and well-being of students while travelling. Non-compliance could also create challenges relating to the laws and regulations of other countries/regions and have an impact on the reputation of the College and the students’ ability to successfully complete the assignment. 9. Communications plan
  • A message will be posted on ICE alerting employees when new or revised policies and procedures are added to ICE.
  • A message will be posted on MyCampus alerting students when new or revised policies and procedures are added.
10. Related forms, legislation or external resources
  • Request for Student Travel Outside Ontario
  • The Traveler Information and Emergency Contact Form
  • The Assumption of Risk, Waiver of Claims, Release of Liability and Indemnity Agreement (Waiver
  • Request for student Travel Outside Ontario
  • The Traveler Information and Emergency Contact Form
  • The Assumption of Risk, Waiver of Claims, Release of Liability and Indemnity Agreement (Waiver).
View policy [PDF]

Student Unpaid Work Placement

ACAD -119

Introduction

1.1. Most College programs require students to complete unpaid work placements as part of their curriculum requirements. It is an expectation of the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities (MTCU) that these students will have workplace disability insurance coverage should they suffer work-related accidents or illnesses while on these unpaid placements. Legislation governing this aspect of the College programs include the Ontario Workplace Safety and Insurance Act and the Ontario Occupational Health & Safety Act. 1.2. By educating students, prior to placement, on the importance of recognizing and ensuring a safe work environment, and actions to take if the environment is not safe, Durham College will be a partner, along with the placement employer and the student, in ensuring that students are safe while on placement.

1. Introduction 1.1. Most College programs require students to complete unpaid work placements as part of their curriculum requirements. It is an expectation of the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities (MTCU) that these students will have workplace disability insurance coverage should they suffer work-related accidents or illnesses while on these unpaid placements. Legislation governing this aspect of the College programs include the Ontario Workplace Safety and Insurance Act and the Ontario Occupational Health & Safety Act. 1.2. By educating students, prior to placement, on the importance of recognizing and ensuring a safe work environment, and actions to take if the environment is not safe, Durham College will be a partner, along with the placement employer and the student, in ensuring that students are safe while on placement. 2. Purpose The purpose of this policy and procedure is to outline Durham College’s role in ensuring that students who are on unpaid work placements have insurance coverage for work-related accidents or work-related illnesses. 3. Definitions Refer to Durham College’s Standard Definitions. 4. Policy statements 4.1. Activities involving placement employers are documented using College-approved templates and/or forms. 4.2. The Ministry does not provide WSIB and/or CHUBB insurance plan coverage when students participate in on-campus unpaid field placements. Durham College provides these students with a limited private insurance plan. 4.3. Annual file audits will be conduct by the Office of Insurance and Risk Management. 4.4. While on placement students must alert their placement supervisor immediately if they become aware of anything that could endanger a placement student’s safety. 5. Procedure 5.1. Pre-Placement 5.1.1. Students must comply with the requirements for placement in accordance with program requirements. This may include, but is not limited to criminal reference checks, immunizations,CPR. 5.1.2. Students must provide proof of completion of all mandatory e-courses before going out on placement to as per program guidelines. 5.1.3. Once a potential placement has been identified, the designated School representative will ensure the completion of the required information by the employer, if one has not been completed in the past two years. 5.1.4. The designated School representative will review the Employer Health and Safety Pre-Placement Site Checklist and follow up where required. Approvals will be renewed at minimum every two years. 5.1.5. As per program requirements, once a suitable placement site has been approved, details about the placement must be documented in order to ensure that a placement student is covered by WSIB or CHUBB insurance in the event of an accident/illness while at the placement site. 5.1.6. Prior to starting placement, the student will review, sign, and date the Student Declaration of Understanding Form and submit as per the program requirements. 5.1.7. On the first day of placement, the student and placement employer will review the “Unpaid Work Placement Student Health and Safety Checklist”, initial, sign, date and submit to the designated School representative as per the program guidelines within 48 hours. 5.1.8. The designated School representative will maintain copies of all completed placement-related forms. These will be stored according to Durham College’s Records Retention schedules. 5.1.9. The designated School representative must complete the Stand-Alone Student Insurance Plan and forward to the Office of Insurance and Risk Management when a student is placed with Durham College as the placement employer. 5.1.10. The designated School representative will provide a list of students on unpaid work placement to the Office of Insurance and Risk Management each semester. 5.2. Accident Reporting Requirements 5.2.1. Students must complete the Durham College Accident/Injury Report within 24 hours. 5.2.2. The designated School representative will inform the placement employer of all accident reporting requirements. Within three days of learning of a work-related reportable accident/injury the placement employer must complete WSIB Form 7 Employer’s Report of accident/injury (which can be accessed from the WSIB website.) and send it to designated School representative. The placement employer agrees to complete a letter of Authorization to Represent Placement Employer and submit it to the designated School representative at Durham College with workplace accident or injury report. 5.2.3. Where required, the Office of Insurance and Risk Management will file appropriate paperwork with MTCU, and WSIB or CHUBB Insurance. 5.2.4. If a placement student, because of a work-related accident or work-related illness, is no longer able to attend placement or seeks medical treatment after the initial report of accident, the student must advise their designated School representative. The designated School representative must notify the Executive Dean/Dean or designate and the Office of Insurance and Risk Management under these circumstances as additional WSIB or CHUBB Insurance forms may be required. 5.2.5. Depending on the severity of the placement student’s injury or illness, and prior to returning to their placement employer, the placement student may need to be assessed by a medical professional. Under these circumstances, the placement student must submit a doctor’s note to the designated School representative stating that they are able to resume their placement. 5.2.6. The original completed accident/injury form and associated documents will be maintained by the Office of Insurance and Risk Management. 5.2.7. The Office of Insurance and Risk Management will review and take the appropriate action(s). 5.3. Incident Reporting Requirements 5.3.1. While on placement, students must alert their placement supervisor immediately if an incident has occurred that the student has witnessed or was involved in, which does not involve injury to themselves. 5.3.2. Students must complete the “Placement Student Incident Report”. The completed form must be forwarded to the appropriate Associate Dean within three days. The Associate Dean will review and take the appropriate action(s). 5.4. MTCU Reporting Requirements 5.4.1. After each semester, MTCU will request statistics on the actual hours of unpaid work placement and the number of students on placement for those unpaid work placements covered by CHUBB Insurance. 5.4.2. To provide these statistics, each School will track and report unpaid work placement statistics to the health and safety officer, as requested. 5.4.3. For those international students attending Durham College on Visa Study authorization who are on work placement, their placement hours must be reported separately to MTCU. 5.4.4. These unpaid placement statistics will be collated and reported to MTCU by Durham College’s health and safety officer. 6. Roles and responsibilities 6.1. It is the responsibility of the Vice-President, Academic to ensure that the Student Unpaid Work Placement policy and procedure is fully implemented. 6.2. It is the responsibility of the designated School representative to ensure that all placement documentation has been completed and that the student and placement employer are aware of all procedures. 6.3. It is the responsibility of the Office of Insurance and Risk Management to conduct annual file audits. 6.4. It is the responsibility of the placement employer to ensure the student is working in a safe environment, has all of the necessary safety equipment, and to notify the designated School representative in the event of an accident/injury or work-related illness. 6.5. It is the responsibility of the placement student to work safely and to notify the placement employer immediately of any work-related accident/injury or work-related illness and the designated School representative within one business day. 7. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act considerations Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards have been considered in the development of this policy and procedure and it adheres to the principles outlined in the College’s commitment to accessibility as demonstrated by the Accessibility Plan (ADMIN-203). 8. Non-compliance implications Non-compliance with this policy may inadvertently place students’ well-being at risk and jeopardize the reputation of the College. 9. Communications plan
  • A message will be posted on ICE alerting employees when new or revised policies and procedures are added to ICE.
  • A message will be posted on MyCampus alerting students when new or revised policies and procedures are added.
10. Related forms, legislation or external resources
  • Ministry Guidelines for Workplace Insurance for Post-secondary Students of Publicly Assisted Institutions on Unpaid Work Placements
  • The following resources are available on the I: drive, in the Student Work Placement folder:
    • Employer Health and Safety Preplacement Site Checklist
    • Unpaid Placement Student Health and Safety Checklist
    • Letter of Authorization to Represent Placement Employer
    • Durham College Accident/Injury Form
    • Post-secondary Student Unpaid Work Placement Workplace Insurance Claim Form
    • Chubb Insurance Brochure 08-21-06 The Accident Insurance Plan Supporting Training Participants, Policy SG10284501 (Ministry Insurance)
    • Chubb Insurance Brochure – Occupational Accidental Death & Dismemberment Insurance, Policy SG10457101 (College Insurance)
    • Letter to Placement Employers
    • Student Declaration of Understanding
    • Placement Student Incident Report
    • Stand-Alone Insurance Application
View policy [PDF]

Students at Academic Risk

ACAD-114

Introduction

Durham College provides support to students who may lack the academic skills, knowledge, and behaviours to progress in their chosen program.

1. Introduction Durham College provides support to students who may lack the academic skills, knowledge, and behaviours to progress in their chosen program. 2. Purpose The purpose of this policy and procedure is to support student success by identifying and addressing academic concerns. 3. Definitions Refer to Durham College’s Standard Definitions. 4. Policy statements 4.1. Students and employees are active partners in the teaching and learning process. 4.2. Employees have an obligation to identify and support students who are not meeting the program learning outcomes associated with their POS. 5. Procedure 5.1. Employees identify a student in need of academic support by completing an Academic Notice form. Types of academic concerns can include, but are not limited to, academic difficulties (poor GPA), missed assessments, poor attendance, lateness to class, leaving class early, lack of participation, inappropriate use of IT and personal mobile devices. 5.2. The employee will invite the student to meet and discuss the academic concern and share the completed Academic Notice form. The student will have two business days to exercise the option of providing comments on the Academic Notice form and/or signing the form in acknowledgement of its receipt. 5.3. The student who is unable to review the completed Academic Notice form and/or refuses to discuss the concern with the employee will be notified in writing (via College email) by the reporting employee that an Academic Notice form has been completed. 5.4. The completed Academic Notice form will be submitted to the appropriate school office (attention of the executive dean/dean or associate dean) or department (attention of the departmental manager) within five business days of the concern being documented by the employee. 5.5. Where required, the executive dean/dean or associate dean or departmental manager will determine the appropriate referrals. 5.6. If the executive dean/dean or associate dean or departmental manager feels the concern identified lies outside of an academic-at-risk concern, the executive dean/dean or associate dean or departmental manager, will provide an electronic or paper copy of the completed Academic Notice form to the Office of Campus Safety. 5.7. The original completed Academic Notice form will be retained in the school office. A copy will be provided to the student via the College email. 5.8. The school office will notify employee of the action taken with respect to the Academic Notice. 6. Roles and responsibilities 6.1. It is the responsibility of the Vice-President, Academic to ensure this policy and procedure is fully implemented. 6.2. It is the responsibility of employees to identify academic concerns, and to make referrals to available support services. 6.3. It is the responsibility of students to access the recommended support services. 7. Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act considerations Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) standards have been considered in the development of this policy and procedure and it adheres to the principles outlined in the College’s commitment to accessibility as demonstrated by the Accessibility Plan (ADMIN-203). 8. Non-compliance implications Failure to comply with this policy may negatively impact student progress, retention and graduation rates. 9. Communications plan
  • A message will be posted on ICE alerting employees when new or revised policies and procedures are added to ICE.
10. Related forms, legislation or external resources
  • None
View policy [PDF]Supporting Document 1